Patterns are not just for wallpaper
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Patterns are not just for wallpaper. Ms. Hackworth. Objectives. Students will discuss sentence patterns that are commonly associated with proper comma usage. (E3-4.4; CC.W.3 ) Students will rewrite a sentence applying their knowledge of comma usage and sentence patterns. (E3-4.5; CC.W.5 )

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Patterns are not just for wallpaper

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Patterns are not just for wallpaper

Patterns are not just for wallpaper

Ms. Hackworth


Objectives

Objectives

  • Students will discuss sentence patterns that are commonly associated with proper comma usage. (E3-4.4; CC.W.3)

  • Students will rewrite a sentence applying their knowledge of comma usage and sentence patterns. (E3-4.5; CC.W.5)

  • Students will write a fable story that demonstrates their knowledge of these sentence patterns by using each pattern at least once. (E3-4.2-3; CC.W.3&5)


Free write

Free write

Write a sentence nonstop for 30 seconds about the following:

Have you ever been tricked? If so, what happened?

Or

Write whatever comes to your mind about the following word: Trickster

(Make sure what you write about is appropriate!)


Commas

Commas

  • The most used (and misused) punctuation.

  • Its job:

    • Separate items in a series.

    • Enclose asides or interrupters.

    • Join sentences when one of the FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so) is used.

    • Separate openers* and closers from independent clauses** or base sentences.


Oxford serial comma

Oxford/serial Comma

  • The Oxford/serial comma

    • The Oxford, or serial comma, is a comma that is placed before a FANBOY in a sentence that has a series.

    • The Oxford comma is starting to disappear from grammar.

      • Why? Because some people believe that it is not needed in a sentence when it is obvious that the last two items are not one thing.

      • Some say the comma should be used. If it is not used, it can make things ambiguous. This means that there are two or more meanings for the last items of the list.


Examples

Examples


Parts of a sentence

Parts of a Sentence

  • Opener:

    • An introductory element that is set off with a comma. An opener could be an adverb, phrase, or dependent clause.

  • Closer:

    • A group of word that are not a sentence on their own placed at the end of an independent clause after a comma.

  • Appositive:

    • A word or group of words that rename a noun in the sentence, acting like a second noun. Usually has a comma on both sides.


Parts of a sentence cont

Parts of a Sentence cont.

  • Clause: contains a subject and a verb.

    • Two types:

      • Dependent clause: A clause that contains a noun and a verb but does not express a complete thought.

        • Since I was in fourth grade.

      • Independent clause: A clause containing both a subject and a verb and expressing a complete thought.

        • Basically, a complete sentence.


Sentence patterns

Sentence Patterns

  • Common sentence patterns that use commas:

    • Interrupter pattern: A word or group of words interrupt the sentence, making it use commas on both sides.

      • My friend, who is a girl, does archery.

    • Serial pattern: Lists Items or actions that are in a series.

      • When I go to the store, I need to pick up milk, eggs, and bread.

    • Closer pattern: A group of words that do not make a sentence on their own placed at the end of an independent clause after the comma.

      • I am going to a party, if you want to come with me.


Can you guess the pattern

Can you guess the pattern?

  • “Fox, as everyone knows, is a trickster and likes nothing better than fooling others.”

  • “Fox made a hole in the ice, right near a place where Bear liked to walk.”

  • “He sat down next to the hole, placed his long beautiful black tail into the icy waterand turned his back.”

    • What would be the difference if a serial/Oxford comma was added to this sentence?

      -Examples from “How Bear Lost His Tail.”


Sentence rewrite

Sentence Rewrite

  • Rewrite the sentence using proper comma usage:

    • “It was long and black and glossy and Bear use to wave it around just so that people will look at it.”

      • Use the sentence patterns from a few slides back.

      • Be prepared to explain why you wrote it this way.


Write your own

Write your own

  • Write your own Letter!


Works cited

Works Cited

Anderson, Jeff. Mechanically Inclined. Portland: Stenhouse Publishers, 2005. Print.


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