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CS 4963: UI Design. Interaction Design, Part 1. Today:. What is Interaction Design, anyways? How do we do interaction design? Fundamentals and Building Blocks Heuristics and Patterns Next Interaction Design lesson: Deliverables Documentation.

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Cs 4963 ui design

CS 4963: UI Design

Interaction Design, Part 1


Today

Today:

  • What is Interaction Design, anyways?

  • How do we do interaction design?

    • Fundamentals and Building Blocks

    • Heuristics and Patterns

  • Next Interaction Design lesson:

    • Deliverables

    • Documentation


Interaction design association ixda

“Interaction Design (IxD) defines the structure and behavior of interactive systems. Interaction Designers strive to create meaningful relationships between people and the products and services that they use, from computers to mobile devices to appliances and beyond.”

—Interaction Design Association (IxDA)


Pabini gabriel petit uxmatters com

“Interaction design defines workflows that support users’ goals and tasks, the affordances through which digital products and services communicate their functionality and interactivity to users, the ways in which users can interact with those affordances, products’ behaviors in response to user interactions, and the methods by which products indicate state changes. Good interaction design facilitates people’s tasks and ensures that digital products are both learnable and usable by reducing complexity as much as possible, preventing user error, adhering to standards when appropriate, and through consistency across an entire product or product line. Typical interaction design deliverables include specifications, wireframes, usage scenarios, and prototypes.”

—Pabini Gabriel-PetitUXMatters.com


Pabini gabriel petit

“Interaction design defines workflows that support users’ goals and tasks, the affordances through which digital products and services communicate their functionality and interactivity to users, the ways in which users can interact with those affordances, products’ behaviors in response to user interactions, and the methods by which products indicate state changes. Good interaction design facilitates people’s tasks and ensures that digital products are both learnable and usable by reducing complexity as much as possible, preventing user error, adhering to standards when appropriate, and through consistency across an entire product or product line. Typical interaction design deliverables include specifications, wireframes, usage scenarios, and prototypes.”

…call and response.

—Pabini Gabriel-Petit


Call and response

Call and response.

(YOU)

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/anirudhkoul/2045497777/


Call and response1

Call and response.

Sing it!

WHOOOOOA!!

WHOOOOOA!!

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/anirudhkoul/2045497777/


Call and response2

Call and response.

We love you!

Encore!

AAAAH! FIRE!!! THE DRUMMER’S HAIR IS ON FIRE!

Freebird! FREEEBIRD!

Yeah!!We’ll play another song as soon as I extinguish the drummer.

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/anirudhkoul/2045497777/


Bill verplank helped develop xerox star establish idii

“Interaction is acting on the world and receiving feedback from the world.” Interaction design is defining how do you [as a user]…- do? Affordances?- feel? Interactivity?- know? Mental models?

from designinginteractions.com

—Bill Verplank(helped develop Xerox Star, establish IDII)


How is ixd done

How is IxD done?

  • Building blocks

    • Affordances (and common controls)

    • States (and Transitions …context!)

    • Feedback (Behavior)

  • Heuristics

    • General approaches

    • Human-Computer Interaction methods

    • Interaction Design Patterns


Building blocks

Building blocks


Affordances

Affordances

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/smig44/2690249520/

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/arrrika/315335846/

Affordances + Constraints => Mappings


Common controls

Common Controls

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/brook/5259347/

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyjcase/2759363747/

?


Feedback

Feedback

vs.

from

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rachelfordjames/2397592716/

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/24thcentury/2381462463/


States

States

  • You’re CS students. You know what states are.

  • Help your user know what state the system is in

  • Helps with mental map

  • Prevents mistakes

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyjcase/2375636885/


Bill buxton microsoft research

“Experience is a temporal phenomenon. ... You need to have as much detail in the transitions as in the states, otherwise you’re going to get it wrong.”

—Bill BuxtonMicrosoft Research


Transitions

Transitions!

???

(these are the same animal?!?)

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/ultimorollo/sets/72157615748412640/


State transition revisited

State transition revisited


General heuristics

General heuristics


Make it easy to recover

Make it easy to recover.

  • First, do no harm!

  • General rule:

  • If it’s something that’s not undoable—a destructive action—, warn.


Be consistent

Be consistent.

  • Make common things behave in the same way

  • Make behavior predictable

from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUSIpRo13ocOn Android phones, the long press always brings up a context menu (or at least, it should).


Consider the locus of attention

Consider the locus of attention.

  • Where possible, put actions for the task at hand at the locus of attention, put other things at the periphery.

from Flickr: edit action is right there.

Remember this, from slide 18?


Be conversational

Be conversational.

  • People like it.

from Google Search

from Google Reader

from GMail


Level of interaction

Level of interaction?

  • Some things you want to be interactive, some you don’t.

  • Many times, the user just wants to get to Point B

from http://www.worrydream.com/MagicInk/(Note that the UI on the right takes less clicks AND makes more information visible.)


Don t annoy

Don’t annoy.

Hey, do you want to allow this app to run as administrator? I know you said yes the last 20 times, but…

Have I told you about this great deal on SPAM? Earn points!

ARE YOU REEEALLY SURE YOU WANT TO SAVE THIS FILE? REALLY??

Beep! Beep! BEEEEEEEP!

JUST LET ME SING FERGOODNESSSAKES

from http://www.flickr.com/photos/anirudhkoul/2045497777/


Surface simplicity hide complexity

Surface simplicity, hide complexity.

  • More choices make people …unhappier?


Human computer interaction

(There is a whole course on this, yes.)

Human-Computer Interaction


Hick s law

Remember this from slide 14?

Hick’s Law

  • More choices visible? Faster...

Time (in msec) = a + b log (n+1)

  • 2


Fitts law

Fitts’ Law!

  • Larger targets, targets on screen edges are easier to hit

D

S

Time (in msec) = a + b log (D / S + 1)

  • 2


Goms keystroke level model

GOMS Keystroke-Level Model

  • Way to measure efficiency of an interface

Example: MKKKKKKKMHPK = 1.35 + 0.2*7 + 1.35 + 0.4 + 1.1 + 0.2 = 13.9 sec


Human interface guidelines

Human Interface Guidelines

  • On top of all this, everyone has their own HIGs and UIGuidelines

  • (Helps with consistency)


Interaction design patterns

Not just for breakfast anymore.

Interaction design patterns


Patterns

Patterns

  • People have done this before

  • Codified best practices

from Chris Messina’s Flickr collection linked in the notes of this slide


Summary

Summary

  • Interaction design is crafting the behavior of your software/app/system.

  • It’s call-and-response, feedback to action.

  • Affordances, constraints, mental models…

  • …and designing the transitions between states.

  • There are general rules, design patterns, and HCI methods that can help.


To be continued

TO BE CONTINUED…


For next time

For next time…

  • Take your first assignment’s BAD design, and make two sketches (plus paragraph each) for how you might make it work better (better affordances, improved feedback, clearer state transitions).

    For the first, keep the same hardware/controls, but relabel/change the interaction as needed. For the second, you can change anything.

    2. Readings for next lesson: on the class blog.


Contact us

Contact Us

Matthias Shapiro

[email protected]

Jason Alderman

[email protected]

http://huah.net/cs4963


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