The performance of vulnerable learners
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The Performance of Vulnerable Learners. Somerset Schools Forum 20 May 2014 Agenda Item 5b Nicola Turner. Vulnerable Learners. This presentation will focus specifically on outcomes for: Long Term Children Looked After Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals Gypsy/Roma pupils

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The Performance of Vulnerable Learners

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The performance of vulnerable learners

The Performance of Vulnerable Learners

Somerset Schools Forum

20 May 2014

Agenda Item 5b

Nicola Turner


Vulnerable learners

Vulnerable Learners

  • This presentation will focus specifically on outcomes for:

  • Long Term Children Looked After

  • Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals

  • Gypsy/Roma pupils

  • Pupils with EAL


Outcomes for long term children looked after

Outcomes for Long Term Children Looked After

Pupil premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers. From April 2014 there will be a Pupil Premium Plus for looked after children allocated from the first day of care rather than six months.

  • What the evidence tells us:

  • Looked after children have poorer educational outcomes than non looked after children.

  • A high proportion have special educational needs.

  • Emotional and behavioural health is often a cause for concern.

  • Although attendance rates are improving they are much higher than those reported for the same group of pupils nationally and by our statistical neighbours.

  • Nationally attainment gaps between looked after and non looked after children have decreased or remained the same from 2012 to 2013. However the gaps are still large especially at KS4.

  • To support the priority of narrowing attainment gaps for children looked after the government is putting the Virtual School Head role on a statutory footing.


Outcomes for long term children looked after1

Outcomes for Long Term Children Looked After


Outcomes for long term children looked after2

Outcomes for Long Term Children Looked After

As with any small cohort it is important to note that the performance of a small number of pupils can have a disproportionate effect on outcomes.

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS): A new EYFS profile was introduced in September 2012 therefore 2013 results are not comparable with previous years. 43% of CLA achieved a good level of development compared with 53% of all pupils and 52% of pupils nationally.

Key Stage 1: The percentage of CLA achieving L2+ in reading has increased for the third year in a row closing the attainment gap between our long term CLA and all pupils nationally to 11.2 percentage points. Although the percentage achieving L2+ in writing increased by 22.3 percentage points to 55.6% the results achieved by our CLA remain significantly lower than the results achieved by all pupils nationally. 66.7% of CLA achieved L2+ in maths. We are out performed by our statistical neighbours in writing and maths (63.5% and 69.6%). 67% of the cohort had a special educational need.


Outcomes for long term children looked after3

Outcomes for Long Term Children Looked After

Key Stage 2: 37.5% of CLA achieved L4+ in maths a significant decrease (50%) on 2012 results. Similarly the percentage of CLA achieving L4+ in reading and writing fell to 25% and 18.8% respectively. Our 2013 results are significantly lower than the those achieved by our statistical neighbours and all pupils nationally. It is important to note that 81% of the cohort had a special educational need.

Key Stage 4: The percentage of CLA achieving 5+A*-C including English and maths has fallen by 0.2 percentage points to 7.9%. Once again our results are lower than those achieved by our statistical neighbours (15.3%, the fourth increase in a row) and all pupils nationally. 84% of the cohort had a special educational need.


Outcomes for pupils eligible for free school meals

Outcomes for Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals

A pupil who has been registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years will qualify for the pupil premium.

  • What the evidence tells us:

  • Lower than average attainment at the end of EYFSP, KS1, 2 and 4.

  • Pupils eligible for FSM in Somerset do not perform as well as the same group of pupils nationally.

  • Eligibility for Free School Meals is used as the main measure for deprivation at pupil level.

  • Children from less deprived areas of the county perform better than those from more deprived areas at the end of each Key Stage.

  • The highest early achievers from deprived backgrounds are overtaken by lower achieving children from advantaged backgrounds by the age of 7.

  • A pupil from a non-deprived background is more than twice as likely to go on to study at university than their deprived peers.


Outcomes for pupils eligible for fsm ks2

Outcomes for Pupils Eligible for FSM: KS2


Outcomes for pupils eligible for fsm ks4

Outcomes for Pupils Eligible for FSM: KS4


Outcomes for pupils eligible for free school meals1

Outcomes for Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals

Early Years Foundation Stage: The percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals achieving a good level of development at 31% is 26 percentage points lower than pupils who are not eligible. Nationally, 36% of pupils eligible for free school meals achieved a good level of development. The introduction of the new profile means results are not comparable with previous years.

Key Stage 1: The percentage of pupils achieving L2+ and L2B+ at the end of KS1 in reading, writing and mathematics has improved for the fifth year in a row to 79%, 74.1% and 84.1% respectively and are in line with the results achieved nationally. The attainment gap between pupils eligible for FSM and their peers has increased between 2012 and 2013 in writing and mathematics.

The percentage of pupils meeting the required standard for phonics decoding is 55% compared to 72.4% of all pupils an increase of 13 percentage points on last years results.


Outcomes for pupils eligible for free school meals2

Outcomes for Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals

Key Stage 2: The percentage of pupils eligible for FSM reaching expected levels of attainment at the end of KS2 in maths has fallen by 1 percentage point to 71.7% (74% of eligible pupils nationally and 85% of all pupils nationally); however, the attainment gap between eligible pupils and their peers is less in maths than in other subjects. The percentage achieving a L4+ in reading and in writing has fallen by 9.1 and 4.5 percentage points respectively to 71% and 64.4%, 55% of pupils achieved a L4+ in reading, writing and maths (combined) compared to 60% FSM and 75% of all pupils nationally and broadly in line with statistical neighbours.

Key Stage 4: The percentage of pupils eligible for FSM achieving 5+A*-C including English and maths has risen by 1.9 percentage points to 30.8%, the fifth increase in a row. The gap between eligible pupils and their peers has reduced by 0.7 percentage points to 30%. Although broadly in line with the results achieved by our statistical neighbours our results remain below those achieved by the same group of pupils nationally (by 7.3 percentage points). Nationally the gap has remained broadly the same at 26.7 percentage points.


Outcomes for gypsy roma traveller children

Outcomes for Gypsy Roma & Traveller Children

The Dedicated Schools Grant funding is designed to help schools improve the performance of ethnic minority pupils, including those of a Gypsy Roma & Irish Traveller background.

  • What the evidence tells us:

  • Gypsy/Roma and traveller of Irish Heritage pupils have the lowest percentage achieving age related expectations across all Key Stages.

  • Gypsy Roma pupils in Somerset perform better than the same group of pupils nationally across all Key Stages.

  • Just over half have a special educational need.


Outcomes for gypsy roma and traveller children

Outcomes for Gypsy Roma and Traveller Children


Outcomes for gypsy roma and traveller children1

Outcomes for Gypsy Roma and Traveller Children

Early Years Foundation Stage: The percentage of Gypsy Roma children achieving a good level of development at 18.5% is nearly 35 percentage points lower than all pupils. The introduction of the new profile means results are not comparable with previous years.

Key Stage 1: The percentage of pupils achieving L2+ at the end of KS1 in reading, writing and mathematics is 61.5%, 57.7% and 61.5% respectively. Maths results have fallen for the third year in a row, however, writing has improved in that time. The attainment gap between Gypsy Roma pupils in Somerset and all pupils in Somerset is just under 30% for Reading and Writing and over 30% in Maths.


Outcomes for gypsy roma and traveller children2

Outcomes for Gypsy Roma and Traveller Children

Key Stage 2: 56% of Gypsy Roma Children achieved L4+ in maths, an increase of 17 percentage points from 2012, but still nearly 30% below all pupils nationally. The gap in reading between Gypsy Roma and all pupils nationally was 30% but the gap in writing was nearly 39%. The percentage of Gypsy Roma pupils reaching the expected level of attainment at the end of KS2 in reading, writing and maths was 28%, this is 47% lower than the attainment of all pupils in Somerset.

Key Stage 4: The percentage of Gypsy Roma pupils achieving 5+A*-C including English and maths has risen by 1.5 percentage points to 18.2% and the percentage achieving 5+ A*-G grades has risen by 7.6% to 90.9%. As with any small cohort, it is important to note that the performance of a small number of pupils can have a disproportionate affect on outcomes.


Outcomes for eal children

Outcomes for EAL Children

Somerset vulnerable group funding for children with EAL is allocated for 2 years through the Dedicated Schools Grant: 100% in the first year, 50% for second.

  • What the evidence tells us:

  • Achievement is higher for pupils whose first language is English when compared to those pupils whose first language is not English across all Key Stages. Attainment gaps are lowest in maths.

  • There is variation in attainment by first language by gender.

  • The numbers of C&YP from minority ethnic groups is rising.

  • Research suggests that EAL learners take 5-7 years to attain English language fluency comparable to their peers, so additional needs remain for a long period.


Outcomes for eal children1

Outcomes for EAL Children


Outcomes for pupils with eal

Outcomes for Pupils with EAL

Early Years Foundation Stage: 40% of pupils whose first language is other than English achieved a good level of development compared to 53% of all pupils and 52% of pupils nationally. Girls out performed the boys by 9 percentage points (40% and 31% respectively)

Key Stage 1: The percentage of pupils achieving L2+ at the end of KS1 in reading, writing and mathematics has improved by 2, 4 and 4 percentage points respectively to 80%, 79% and 88%, although these results are still lower than the attainment all pupils nationally. At 1 percentage point the gap in maths is at its lowest since 2010.

Key Stage 2: 79% achieved L4+ in reading compared to 81% in 2012; 68% in writing and 82% in maths. At nearly 15 percentage points the attainment gap between pupils with EAL and all pupils nationally is greatest in writing. The gap in maths has fallen to under 3 percentage points.


Outcomes for pupils with eal1

Outcomes for Pupils with EAL

Key Stage 4: 44.4% of pupils with EAL achieved 5+A*-C including English and maths compared to 58.4% of pupils whose first language is English and 60.8% of all pupils nationally. 44.4% represents a decrease of 5.6 percentage points on 2011/12 results and is the lowest it has been since 2009/10.


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