UWE Bristol  Harvard referencing at UWE

UWE Bristol Harvard referencing at UWE PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Academic knowledge. develops by examining the ideas and work of others, and building on these.new ideas are treated like someone's property.academic honesty is therefore paramount.using other people's ideas, words, images without acknowledgement is dishonest and is known as plagiarism .. Pla

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UWE Bristol Harvard referencing at UWE

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1. UWE Bristol Harvard referencing at UWE UWE Library Services Note that slides 1-16 constitute the content of the session. Slides 17-26 just provide additional examples in case you are asked about any of these other formats. Aims of the session: to understand why you are expected to give a reference list at the end of each piece of work to give you a basic understanding of plagiarism and how to avoid it to understand how to reference correctly using the UWE Harvard referencing system to know how to get more help if you need itNote that slides 1-16 constitute the content of the session. Slides 17-26 just provide additional examples in case you are asked about any of these other formats. Aims of the session: to understand why you are expected to give a reference list at the end of each piece of work to give you a basic understanding of plagiarism and how to avoid it to understand how to reference correctly using the UWE Harvard referencing system to know how to get more help if you need it

2. Academic knowledge develops by examining the ideas and work of others, and building on these. new ideas are treated like someone’s property. academic honesty is therefore paramount. using other people’s ideas, words, images without acknowledgement is dishonest and is known as plagiarism .

3. Plagiarism a form of cheating. can be deliberate or unintentional is an assessment offence Collusion producing a piece of work with others that you claim is all your own work. another form of academic dishonesty. also an assessment offence Plagiarism will be detected – academics know their subject areas and the associated literature. Software that detects plagiarism is also in use in some Departments. Even if unintentional, plagiarism is treated as an assessment offence – ‘I didn’t realise....’ is not an excuse. Collusion is another assessment offence. A lot of coursework at UWE involves working in a group, but for assessed work, you’ll always be asked to produce something that is an individual piece of work – it needs to be exactly that.Plagiarism will be detected – academics know their subject areas and the associated literature. Software that detects plagiarism is also in use in some Departments. Even if unintentional, plagiarism is treated as an assessment offence – ‘I didn’t realise....’ is not an excuse. Collusion is another assessment offence. A lot of coursework at UWE involves working in a group, but for assessed work, you’ll always be asked to produce something that is an individual piece of work – it needs to be exactly that.

4. Avoid plagiarism by: keeping accurate records of your sources – as you find them. identifying material that needs referencing. paraphrasing, summarising and quoting correctly. referencing correctly, by citing within your text and providing a list of references. Keep details of what you’ve read or used – as you go along; difficult to track back later. All sources need referencing – TV programmes, newspapers, website, blogs etc as well as books and articles You might want to quote directly from someone's work, summarise their ideas, or express things in your own words – important to make the original source clear and reference it correctly. Give a citation within the text and the full reference in the list at the end.Keep details of what you’ve read or used – as you go along; difficult to track back later. All sources need referencing – TV programmes, newspapers, website, blogs etc as well as books and articles You might want to quote directly from someone's work, summarise their ideas, or express things in your own words – important to make the original source clear and reference it correctly. Give a citation within the text and the full reference in the list at the end.

5. Referencing allows you to: acknowledge that you’ve used someone else’s ideas. identify the sources of these. demonstrate that you’ve read around the topic, and show how you’ve developed your own ideas. substantiate your arguments. enable your reader to follow up your source material. ...and so, avoid plagiarism, even when unintentional. So to recap and summarise..... So to recap and summarise.....

6. Harvard referencing system at UWE a standard method for describing a document . elements of the reference are given in a particular order and format, separated by specific punctuation. Citations in text link to full references at end of work. Based on author and year of publication. References listed in alphabetical order of authors

7. Book Author surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title. Edition (if not first). Place of publication: Publisher. Pearson, A., Field, J., Ford, D. and Jordon, Z. (2007) Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Nursing and Health Care: Assimilating Research, Experience and Expertise. 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Example: print book List all the authors For editor use ed. Or eds. after the name/s, but this will not be in brackets Other points to mention: The year of publication will follow the author and will be within round brackets The first letter of all words in a book title are capitalised, The book title will always be in italics Add the edition of the book if not the first edition. Use lower case ‘ed.’. Then place of publishing followed by the publisher. If this information is not known, then it can be left out. All this information should be on the reverse of the title page of the book If you used an eBook then the reference would be set out in a similar way, you would only need to add [online] after the Title, and an ‘Accessed’ followed by the date in square brackets. Example: print book List all the authors For editor use ed. Or eds. after the name/s, but this will not be in brackets Other points to mention: The year of publication will follow the author and will be within round brackets The first letter of all words in a book title are capitalised, The book title will always be in italics Add the edition of the book if not the first edition. Use lower case ‘ed.’. Then place of publishing followed by the publisher. If this information is not known, then it can be left out. All this information should be on the reverse of the title page of the book If you used an eBook then the reference would be set out in a similar way, you would only need to add [online] after the Title, and an ‘Accessed’ followed by the date in square brackets.

8. Electronic Book Author surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title [online].Edition (if not first). Place of publication: Publisher. [Accessed: DD Month YYYY]. Pearson, A., Field, J., Ford, D. and Jordon, Z. (2007) Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Nursing and Health Care: Assimilating Research, Experience and Expertise [online] 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing [Accessed 07 September 2011]. Example ebook: set out in a similar way to a print book. Add [online] after the Title, and an ‘Accessed’ followed by the date in square brackets. No need to give the URL of an eBook, as there is already sufficient information for the reader to trace the book.Example ebook: set out in a similar way to a print book. Add [online] after the Title, and an ‘Accessed’ followed by the date in square brackets. No need to give the URL of an eBook, as there is already sufficient information for the reader to trace the book.

9. Journal article Author surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title of the article. Journal Title. Volume no. (Part no.), page numbers. Edge, I. and Murphy, V. (1976) New uses of technology in dentistry. British Dental Journal. 8 (3), pp. 450-600. Example: print journal article: The author surname, followed by initials, the year of publication in round brackets Capitalise the first letter of all main words in the journal title. However, only the first word of a journal article title is capitalised. Proper nouns, should be always be capitalised. The journal title will be in italics. Followed by volume number, then the part or issue number in round brackets, if there is one. Finally, add the page numbers, using p. for a single page; pp. for a range of pages. Electronic journal article – next slide Example: print journal article: The author surname, followed by initials, the year of publication in round brackets Capitalise the first letter of all main words in the journal title. However, only the first word of a journal article title is capitalised. Proper nouns, should be always be capitalised. The journal title will be in italics. Followed by volume number, then the part or issue number in round brackets, if there is one. Finally, add the page numbers, using p. for a single page; pp. for a range of pages. Electronic journal article – next slide

10. Electronic journal article Author surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title of the article. Journal Title [online] . Volume no. (Part no.), page numbers. [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. Edge, I. and Murphy, V. (1976) New uses of technology in dentistry. British Dental Journal [online]. 8 (3), pp. 450-600. [Accessed 21 July 2011]. Example: electronic journal article As for an ebook, no need to include the URL, as there is sufficient information for the item to be traced. Include [online] after the JOURNAL TITLE, and the date accessed, as this indicates when and how it was viewed, in case there is any change to the online version as compared to the print, for instance. Example: electronic journal article As for an ebook, no need to include the URL, as there is sufficient information for the item to be traced. Include [online] after the JOURNAL TITLE, and the date accessed, as this indicates when and how it was viewed, in case there is any change to the online version as compared to the print, for instance.

11. Web page Author surname, Initials. / Organisation (Year of publication) Title of Internet Site. Available from: URL of the web page [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. Royal College of Nursing (2009) Learning and Education. Available from: http://www.rcn.org.uk /development/learning [Accessed 22 December 2010]. Example: web page. Remember – all sources need referencing. When referencing a website it is important to provide all the data that would be needed for the reader to locate the information that is referred to if they wished. If the web page has an author give surname, followed by initials. If an author is not evident then an organisation could be used instead. If there is no author or organisation: just use the title of the web site. The year of publication, or date it was last updated will follow, and this will be in round brackets. (no date) if this is not known. The title will be in italics and with main capitalised. Then: Available from: followed by the URL. There will be no full stop after the URL, as this may interfere with the URL and prevent you from linking to the page. Then: Accessed and date in square brackets. As information on the web can be moved or changed so quickly it is important to state the date accessed. Example: web page. Remember – all sources need referencing. When referencing a website it is important to provide all the data that would be needed for the reader to locate the information that is referred to if they wished. If the web page has an author give surname, followed by initials. If an author is not evident then an organisation could be used instead. If there is no author or organisation: just use the title of the web site. The year of publication, or date it was last updated will follow, and this will be in round brackets. (no date) if this is not known. The title will be in italics and with main capitalised. Then: Available from: followed by the URL. There will be no full stop after the URL, as this may interfere with the URL and prevent you from linking to the page. Then: Accessed and date in square brackets. As information on the web can be moved or changed so quickly it is important to state the date accessed.

12. Citing within your text ....( Author surname, Year of publication )... Up to 3 authors: list all More than 3 authors: use 1st author, followed by et al. The need for care and guidance (Pearson et al., 2007) is evident. Pearson et al. (2007, p.4 ) state that ‘decision making in health care has changed profoundly’. Several ways of approaching this depending on context.Several ways of approaching this depending on context.

13. Help and more Step 1: Help yourself iSkillZone – guide to referencing mySkills Library workshops Step 2: Ask a Librarian Step 3: Make an enquiry iSkillZone is the place to go for referencing guidance. Click on red box – has embedded link to iSZ referencing guide. Contains: full advice on how to cite and reference over 70 examples of media (A-Z of formats) advice on quoting, paraphrasing and summarising downloadable quick guide in PDF format Broader information on academic writing, reading and referencing is available from mySkills, UWE’s study skills portal. Click on link. mySkills also available via tab in blackboard. you can email us with a question anytime, or use the option to chat with a librarian via Ask a Librarian; links on every library webpage;. And of course, Help is available from library staff at the Help Desk You may also be interested in using RefWorks software, which allows you to store your references and will format them correctly for you – particularly handy for Dissertation, Thesis and article writing. Come along to a Refworks workshop to find out more.iSkillZone is the place to go for referencing guidance. Click on red box – has embedded link to iSZ referencing guide. Contains: full advice on how to cite and reference over 70 examples of media (A-Z of formats) advice on quoting, paraphrasing and summarising downloadable quick guide in PDF format Broader information on academic writing, reading and referencing is available from mySkills, UWE’s study skills portal. Click on link. mySkills also available via tab in blackboard. you can email us with a question anytime, or use the option to chat with a librarian via Ask a Librarian; links on every library webpage;. And of course, Help is available from library staff at the Help Desk You may also be interested in using RefWorks software, which allows you to store your references and will format them correctly for you – particularly handy for Dissertation, Thesis and article writing. Come along to a Refworks workshop to find out more.

14. Additional examples:

15. Newspaper article Author surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title of the article. Title of Newspaper. DD Month of publication, page number of the article (if given). Weaver, M. (2010) The Chilean miners: who’s who at the surface. The Guardian. 14 October, p. 5. A Newspaper article is very similar to a journal article, but with a date where the Volume and Issue would be noted, and the name of the newspaper where the name of the journal would be.A Newspaper article is very similar to a journal article, but with a date where the Volume and Issue would be noted, and the name of the newspaper where the name of the journal would be.

16. Television Programme Title of Series (Year of first broadcast) Series number, Episode number, Episode title if applicable [TV]. Channel, DD Month of first broadcast. Yes, Prime Minister (1986) Series 1, Episode 1, The Ministerial Broadcast [TV]. BBC Two, 16 January. In our full guidance, we give examples of TV programmes that were viewed on the internet, for instance, via BBC’s iPlayer, or on Box of Broadcasts, and also examples where a TV programme was viewed on a DVD. These would be used where you have used a DVD’s that you have purchased, rather than the off-air recordings that we have in the library: for these, a student can reference it as per the example on this slide, as it was recorded directly from the television. There is usually enough information on the DVD case to tell the difference, and if anything is missing, a quick search on the internet can usually provide the rest of the details. Title in italics, followed by the year of first broadcast in round brackets, series number, episode number and episode title, if applicable. The format, e.g. “TV” would follow in square brackets, then the television channel, and lastly the date of transmission. It is not necessary to repeat the year of broadcast. In our full guidance, we give examples of TV programmes that were viewed on the internet, for instance, via BBC’s iPlayer, or on Box of Broadcasts, and also examples where a TV programme was viewed on a DVD. These would be used where you have used a DVD’s that you have purchased, rather than the off-air recordings that we have in the library: for these, a student can reference it as per the example on this slide, as it was recorded directly from the television. There is usually enough information on the DVD case to tell the difference, and if anything is missing, a quick search on the internet can usually provide the rest of the details. Title in italics, followed by the year of first broadcast in round brackets, series number, episode number and episode title, if applicable. The format, e.g. “TV” would follow in square brackets, then the television channel, and lastly the date of transmission. It is not necessary to repeat the year of broadcast.

17. Interview on TV/Radio Surname of person being interviewed, Initials. (Year of interview) Title of interview (if any). Interview with Interviewee’s name OR Interview by Interviewer’s name. Title of publication or broadcast, Channel, Date of broadcast DD Month. Blair, T. (2007) The Tony Blair interview with Andrew Marr. Interview with Tony Blair. The Andrew Marr Show, BBC One, 05 September. You are most likely to quote the interviewee, therefore they are given as the primary name on the reference. The year of interview only needs to be given once. This will be in round brackets. The title will follow, although there may not be an official title. Interview with, followed by interviewee’s name, OR interview by, and then interviewer’s name. Title of publication or broadcast, in italics. Followed by the date of broadcast, don’t need to mention year again. You are most likely to quote the interviewee, therefore they are given as the primary name on the reference. The year of interview only needs to be given once. This will be in round brackets. The title will follow, although there may not be an official title. Interview with, followed by interviewee’s name, OR interview by, and then interviewer’s name. Title of publication or broadcast, in italics. Followed by the date of broadcast, don’t need to mention year again.

18. Video Sharing (e.g. YouTube, Dailymotion, Vimeo etc) Name of person/organisation posting the video. (Year of posting) Title of the video. Title of the internet web site [video]. DD Month of posting. Available from: URL of the web page [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. International News 24/7 (2010) France faces strikes and protests over pension reform. YouTube [video]. 07 September. Available from: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=O_S6mldSB9k [Accessed 13 September 2010]. The person posting the video is given as a ‘creator’ and the year of posting is given instead of the year a clip may have been created, as YouTube and other video sharing websites have the flexibility to allow a person to edit a video clip, as well as to post their own original material. Therefore, where a student references YouTube, they should ideally be referring to an official version and not an illegal, potentially edited copy, unless there is an academic reason to have done so. A web link is included here as everyone should be able to access the clip. The date of viewing is important, as it is possible that it may be edited or removed after being viewed.The person posting the video is given as a ‘creator’ and the year of posting is given instead of the year a clip may have been created, as YouTube and other video sharing websites have the flexibility to allow a person to edit a video clip, as well as to post their own original material. Therefore, where a student references YouTube, they should ideally be referring to an official version and not an illegal, potentially edited copy, unless there is an academic reason to have done so. A web link is included here as everyone should be able to access the clip. The date of viewing is important, as it is possible that it may be edited or removed after being viewed.

19. Blogs Author surname, Initials. (Year of posting) Title of the blog entry. Title of blog. DD Month of posted message. Available from: URL of the web page [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. Rogers, S. (2010) Local council spending over £500: full list of who has published what so far. Data Blog. 10 September. Available from: http://www.guardian .co.uk/news/datablog/2010/sep/10/local-council-spending-over-500-list [Accessed 13 September 2010]. Weblogs, or blogs are used by individuals or organisations to record issues of interest or concern. They are usually quite informal. An author may only use their first name or an alias. Always use the name they have used in the reference. The year of posting needs to be added, but only once. The title of the blog entry, only the first letter needs to be capitalised. Title of blog: the first letters of all words in the blog name need to be capitalised. Date and month that the message was posted, followed by Available from, colon and the URL of the web page. Finally the date it was accessed is important as Blogs will be edited frequently, this will come at the end in square brackets. Weblogs, or blogs are used by individuals or organisations to record issues of interest or concern. They are usually quite informal. An author may only use their first name or an alias. Always use the name they have used in the reference. The year of posting needs to be added, but only once. The title of the blog entry, only the first letter needs to be capitalised. Title of blog: the first letters of all words in the blog name need to be capitalised. Date and month that the message was posted, followed by Available from, colon and the URL of the web page. Finally the date it was accessed is important as Blogs will be edited frequently, this will come at the end in square brackets.

20. Social Networking web site (e.g. Facebook, Twitter etc) Author surname, Initials. (Year of posting) Title of the group/page. Title of Social Network Site [online]. DD Month of posting. Available from: URL of the web page [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. Smith, J. (2010) UWE Bristol. Facebook [online]. 13 June. Available from: http://www. facebook.com/#!/uwebristol [Accessed 22 December 2010]. Include the author surname, followed by the initials. Year of posting, this only needs to be included once. Title of the group, only first word to be capitalised. Title of social networking site, in italics and all words to be in capitals, apart from linking words. On many of these sites you have to be friends with a person to see what has been written, or ‘like’ the page (e.g. for organisations like UWE), or Follow someone (e.g. Twitter), but as it is likely to be a posting on an organisation’s site that is referenced, it is worth adding in the URL so that the reader can choose to ‘Follow’ or ‘Like’ the page. Include the author surname, followed by the initials. Year of posting, this only needs to be included once. Title of the group, only first word to be capitalised. Title of social networking site, in italics and all words to be in capitals, apart from linking words. On many of these sites you have to be friends with a person to see what has been written, or ‘like’ the page (e.g. for organisations like UWE), or Follow someone (e.g. Twitter), but as it is likely to be a posting on an organisation’s site that is referenced, it is worth adding in the URL so that the reader can choose to ‘Follow’ or ‘Like’ the page.

21. Image or illustration (accessed electronically) Artist surname, Initials. (Date of creation) Title of the work [medium]. At: place where the work is housed: institution or collection that houses the work [online]. Available from: URL of the web page [Accessed DD Month YYYY]. Turner, J.M.W. (c.1925-30) Sunrise [Watercolour on paper]. At: London: Tate Britain [online]. Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk [Accessed 19 December 2010]. The internet has meant that visual sources such as images and artistic works are more often than not viewed online. This example is for sources viewed electronically, but the full guidance gives advice on images taken from a book or viewed at a gallery or exhibition. Artist surname, initials. The date, however, if there is not an exact date known you can put c. to denote ‘circa’. The title of the work will follow in italics, and then the medium of the work in square brackets, e.g. [oil on canvas]. It was decided that the location where the art work is housed should be included, followed by the name of the gallery. For example At: London: Tate modern. Then include that this was viewed online, also in square brackets. As with other electronic resources referenced the URL should follow and then the date it was accessed in square brackets. The internet has meant that visual sources such as images and artistic works are more often than not viewed online. This example is for sources viewed electronically, but the full guidance gives advice on images taken from a book or viewed at a gallery or exhibition. Artist surname, initials. The date, however, if there is not an exact date known you can put c. to denote ‘circa’. The title of the work will follow in italics, and then the medium of the work in square brackets, e.g. [oil on canvas]. It was decided that the location where the art work is housed should be included, followed by the name of the gallery. For example At: London: Tate modern. Then include that this was viewed online, also in square brackets. As with other electronic resources referenced the URL should follow and then the date it was accessed in square brackets.

22. Music or spoken word recordings Composer surname, Initials. (Year of publication) Title. Subsidiary Originator (e.g. performer, conductor). Place of distribution: Distribution Company. Bach, J.S. (1850) The Goldberg Variations. Hans Bischoff, conductor. Los Angeles: Alfred Publishing. Composer/artists surname and initials Year of publication in round brackets. This will be followed by the title in italics, and again all main words in the title are capitalised. It was decided that the subsidiary originator (conductor/performer) should be noted and this would be followed by the place of distribution and the distribution company. If the composer, or artist is not known then use the title first. Music downloaded from iTunes etc should be referenced using the Audio Download format.Composer/artists surname and initials Year of publication in round brackets. This will be followed by the title in italics, and again all main words in the title are capitalised. It was decided that the subsidiary originator (conductor/performer) should be noted and this would be followed by the place of distribution and the distribution company. If the composer, or artist is not known then use the title first. Music downloaded from iTunes etc should be referenced using the Audio Download format.

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