Serving as a rookie water board member
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Serving as a Rookie Water Board Member? PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 50 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Serving as a Rookie Water Board Member?. D. Lynn Tate, President High Plains Water District. Created as an alternative to state control of groundwater. First groundwater conservation district formed in Texas following passage of Groundwater Conservation Districts Act of 1949.

Download Presentation

Serving as a Rookie Water Board Member?

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Serving as a rookie water board member

Serving as a Rookie Water Board Member?

D. Lynn Tate,

President

High Plains Water District


Serving as a rookie water board member

Created as an alternative to state control of groundwater.

First groundwater conservation district formed in Texas following passage of Groundwater Conservation Districts Act of 1949.

Created September 29, 1951 by voters and Texas legislature as a political subdivision of the State of Texas. (61 years of service)

Enabling legislation & Chapter 36 of Tex. Water Code Ann. charges the district to “conserve, preserve, and protect the underground waters” in a 16-county service area.

Funded by ad valorem taxes

$ 0.00754 per $100 valuation

($7.54 / year per $100,000)


Serving as a rookie water board member

Water Planning for the Future

“Texas does not have enough existing water supplies today to meet the demand for water during times of drought.”

-- 2012 State Water Plan


Groundwater legislation impacting districts

Groundwater Legislation Impacting Districts

  • Senate Bill 1 – 1997

    • Shared management plans between districts.

    • Created regional water planning process.

  • Senate Bill 2 – 2001

    • Designation of groundwater management areas (GMAs).

    • Formalized groundwater availability modeling.

    • Legislature recognizes groundwater

      conservation districts as “preferred method

      of groundwater management” in Texas.

  • House Bill 1763 – 2005

    • Groundwater Management Areas to adopt Desired Future Conditions.

    • Changed responsibility for determination of groundwater availability.

    • Now codified as Chapter 36.108 of Tex. Water Code Ann.


Future water needs

Future Water Needs??

  • Population of Texas expected to increase from 25.4 million in 2000 to 46.3 million in 2060.

  • Water demand in Texas expected to increase 22% between

    2010-2060.

    - 18 million acre-feet in 2000 to 22 million acre-feet in 2060.

  • Existing water supplies in Texas expected to decrease

    10% between 2000-2060

    - 17 million acre-feet in 2000 to 15.3 million acre-feet in 2060.

  • Existing groundwater supplies expected to decline

    30% between 2010-2060.

    • 8 million acre-feet in 2000 to 5.7 million acre-feet in 2060.


16 groundwater management areas gmas

16 Groundwater Management Areas(GMAs)


Hpwd 50 50 management goal 2011

HPWD “50/50” Management Goal (2011)

  • HPWD Board of Directors implement a “50/50” Management Goal within district.

  • Goal is to have 50 percent of groundwater in storage as of Jan. 1, 2010 available for use

    Jan. 1, 2060.

  • This desired future condition must be revisited every 5 years.


Senate bill 332 effective 9 1 2011

Senate Bill 332(Effective 9-1-2011)

Amends Tex. Water Code to provide that landowner owns the groundwater below the land surface as real property.

Landowners are entitled to drill for and produce groundwater from beneath their property (without causing waste or malicious drainage)—but would not be entitled to a right to capture a specific amount of water.

These rights and interests can be limited by a groundwater conservation district’s rules—including allocation of a proportionate share of groundwater for production based upon the number of acres owned by the landowner.

Source: Legislative Budget Board Fiscal Note


Proposed house bill 4

Proposed House Bill 4

  • Structural changes to Texas Water Development Board

  • Full time 3 commissioners appointed by Governor

  • 9 member advisory board

  • $2,000,000,000 from Rainy Day Fund

  • 10% to Rural Project/10% Conservation

  • House Bill 4 Similar


Proposed senate bill 302

Proposed Senate Bill 302

  • Set restrictions on GCD until receive Plan approval

  • TWDB 60 days to determine if GDC Plan meets DFC

  • Interim permits until Plan approved


Proposed senate bill 272

Proposed Senate Bill 272

  • Mandatory reporting of usage

  • Method to be determined by TWDB


Edwards aquifer authority et al v burrell day et al tex 2012

Edwards Aquifer Authority, et al. v. Burrell Day, et al. (Tex. 2012)

  • Landowners own groundwater (Chapter 36 Tex. Water Code Ann.)

  • Recognized Rule of Capture

  • GCD have right to regulateGCD have broad statutory authority

  • Activities remain under local electorate’s supervision

  • GCD have little supervision beyond the local level

  • Groundwater rights are property rights subject to constitutional protection

  • If GCD’s rules constitute a “taking” landowner entitled to reasonable compensation


  • Login