basic data analysis
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Basic Data Analysis

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Basic Data Analysis - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 116 Views
  • Uploaded on

Basic Data Analysis. Tabulation. Frequency table Percentages. A Typical Table. Type of Measurement. Type of descriptive analysis. Nominal. Cross Tabs Mode. Type of Measurement. Type of descriptive analysis. Ordinal. Rank order Median. Type of Measurement. Type of

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Basic Data Analysis ' - kass


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
tabulation
Tabulation
  • Frequency table
  • Percentages
slide4

Type of

Measurement

Type of

descriptive analysis

Nominal

Cross Tabs

Mode

slide5

Type of

Measurement

Type of

descriptive analysis

Ordinal

Rank order

Median

slide6

Type of

Measurement

Type of

descriptive analysis

Interval

Arithmetic mean

cross tabulation
CROSS-TABULATION
  • Analyze data by groups or categories
  • Compare differences
  • Percentage cross-tabulations
data transformation
Data Transformation
  • A.K.A data conversion
  • Changing the original form of the data to a new format
  • More appropriate data analysis
  • New variables
    • Summated
    • Standardized
degrees of significance
Degrees of Significance
  • Mathematical differences
  • Statistically significant differences
  • Managerially significant differences
testing the hypotheses
Testing the Hypotheses
  • The key question is whether we reject or fail to reject the hypothesis.
  • Depends on the results of the hypothesis test
    • If testing differences between groups, was the difference statistically significant
    • If testing impact of independent variable on dependent variable, was the impact statistically significant
  • How the hypothesis was worded
differences between groups
Differences Between Groups
  • Primary tests used are ANOVA and MANOVA
  • ANOVA = Analysis of Variance
  • MANOVA = Multiple Analysis of Variance
  • Significance Standard:
    • Churchill (1978) Alpha or Sig. less than or equal to 0.05
  • If Sig. is less than or equal to 0.05, then a statistically significant difference exists between the groups.
example
Example
  • Hypothesis: No difference exists between females and males on technophobia.
  • If a statistically significant difference exists, we reject the hypothesis.
  • If no s.s. difference exists, we fail to reject.
example1
Example
  • Hypothesis: Males are more technophobic then females (i.e., a difference does exist)
  • If a statistically significant difference exists, and it is in the direction predicted, we fail to reject the hypothesis.
  • If no s.s. difference exists, or if females are statistically more likely to be technophobic, we reject the hypothesis.
testing for significant causality
Testing for Significant Causality
  • Simple regression or Multiple regression
  • Same standard of significance (Churchill 1978)
  • Adj. R2 = percentage of the variance in the dependent variable explained by the regression model.
  • If Sig. is less than or equal to 0.05, then the independent variable IS having a statistically significant impact on the dependent variable.
  • Note: must take into account whether the impact is positive or negative.
example2
Example
  • Hypothesis: Technophobia positively influences mental intangibility.
  • If a technophobia is shown to statistically impact mental intangibility (Sig. is less than or equal to 0.05), AND.
  • The impact is positive, we fail to reject the hypothesis.
  • Otherwise, we reject the hypothesis.
ad