Engine Failure Training
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Engine Failure Training Francis Fagegaltier PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 82 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Engine Failure Training Francis Fagegaltier. Fatal Accidents, Worldwide Commercial Jet Fleet, 1998 Through 2007: Total = 90 Attributed to « System/Component Failure or Malfunction (Powerplant) »  = 2

Download Presentation

Engine Failure Training Francis Fagegaltier

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

Engine Failure Training

Francis Fagegaltier


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • Fatal Accidents, Worldwide Commercial Jet Fleet, 1998 Through 2007:

    • Total = 90

    • Attributed to « System/Component Failure or Malfunction (Powerplant) »  = 2

      • Source : Boeing Statistical Summary of Commercial Jet Airplane Accidents, Worldwide Operations 1959 – 2007 (2007 statistical summary, July 2008)

  • In short, approximately 2% of accidents have an “engine” failure at the root.

  • Although obviously not the major cause of accidents, as part of the global effort for improving the safety level, it is necessary to reduce the likelihood of such cause of accidents.


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • The two main types of “engine related” accidents are the following:

    • N°1 : uncontained high energy debris (e.g. disk burst).


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • The two main types of “engine related” accidents are the following:

    • N°1 : uncontained high energy debris (e.g. disk burst).

    • N°2 : Propulsion System Malfunction + Inappropriate Crew Response (PSM+ICR)

  • Authorities and Engine Industry (Europe and USA) have worked together to reduce the probability of occurrence of the N°1 cause (concept of critical parts).

    • The N°2 cause is then likely to become the new N°1 (if not already the N°1).


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • Obviously, the PSM+ICR cause is not purely technical because human factors play a role in it.

  • Because of the human factors, in order to minimise the probability of occurrence of this cause of accident, training must be considered.

    • To draw attention on the subject is the first step in such training.


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • Following a NTSB recommendation arising from the 13 December 1994 turboprop accident at Raleigh-Durham, FAA requested a report from US Industry (AIA).

    • The European Industry was associated to this work (AECMA).

  • As a result, a joint AIA/AECMA report was issued.

    • Among other possible actions, they identified a need for specific training.


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.

      • This is 1 IFSD every 200 000 engine hours.


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.

      • This is 1 IFSD every 200 000 engine hours.

    • This translates into 1 IFSD every 100 000 aircraft hours (2 engines).


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.

      • This is 1 IFSD every 200 000 engine hours.

    • This translates into 1 IFSD every 100 000 aircraft hours (2 engines).

    • Pilot flies 1 000 hours per year


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.

      • This is 1 IFSD every 200 000 engine hours.

    • This translates into 1 IFSD every 100 000 aircraft hours (2 engines).

    • Pilot flies 1 000 hours per year

  • Conclusion :


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • What is currently the safety level with regard to turbofan engines?

  • In order to illustrate, let us take the case of one pilot in a twin engine transport aircraft.

  • Assumptions

    • Engine In-flight shut-down (IFSD) rate : 5 x 10-6 per engine hour.

      • This is 1 IFSD every 200 000 engine hours.

    • This translates into 1 IFSD every 100 000 aircraft hours (2 engines).

    • Pilot flies 1 000 hours per year

  • Conclusion :

    • Statistically, this pilot would experience only 1 IFSD in …. 100 years !


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • The IFSD rate of 5 x 10-6 per flight hour is based on all events, engine caused or not.

  • Hazardous engine events (e.g. disk burst) represent a very limited part of this rate.

  • Some other events, not classified as hazardous, may be impressive, e.g. bird strikes or fan blade failures.

    • With effects such as engine surge (flames becoming visible), vibrations, noise, …


Engine failure training francis fagegaltier

  • With a so low IFSD rate, how can a pilot be prepared for the effect of a “major” engine failure ?

    • What kind of training could compensate for the lack of practical experience ?

      • Can a simulator reproduce the effects of a fan blade failure (of course, as experienced in the cockpit through the aircraft structure) ?

  • The first training tool is to provide basic information for awareness raising.

    • FAA has published a video with a clear message to the pilots: fly the aircraft, deal with the engine event later, when flight is controlled.

      • Air Transport Association and FAA training aid entitled « Airplane Turbofan Engine Malfunction Recognition and Response »


  • Login