Wli 1 st regional coordination meeting icarda aleppo syria 13 15 february 2011
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WLI 1 st Regional Coordination Meeting (ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, 13-15 February, 2011. Jordan. Name of presenter :Dr. Yasser Mohawesh. The WLI Country Support Team. Bio-Physical Team Team Leader: Eng. Safa Mazaherh Members: Eng. Muhamad Muddaber Eng. Lubna Mahasneh

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Wli 1 st regional coordination meeting icarda aleppo syria 13 15 february 2011

WLI 1st Regional Coordination Meeting(ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria, 13-15 February, 2011


Name of presenter dr yasser mohawesh

Jordan

Name of presenter :Dr. Yasser Mohawesh


The wli country support team
The WLI Country Support Team

Bio-Physical Team

Team Leader:

  • Eng. Safa Mazaherh

    Members:

  • Eng. Muhamad Muddaber

  • Eng. Lubna Mahasneh

  • Dr. Nabeel Bani Hani

  • Eng. Hamzeh Rawashdeh

Socio-Economic Team

Team Leader:

  • Dr.Samia Akroush

    Members :

  • Eng. Raed Badwan

  • Eng. Omama Hadidi

  • Eng. Malik Abo Roman


Part ii socio economic characterization
Part II: Socio-economic Characterization

  • II.1 Livelihood assessment









Part ii socio economic characterization1
Part II: Socio-economic Characterization

  • II.2 Livestock characterization




Average total cost of livestock watering and average quantity consumed per year for the whole sample .


Water Sources for livestock in rangeland areas. quantity consumed per year for the whole sample .


Part iii weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site
Part III: weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • III.1 Main problems and challenges facing farmers at the site/region level

  • Constraints in livestock production :

  • Diseases

  • Grazing

  • Mortality ,Milk drought

  • Feed shortage

  • High prices of veterinary services

  • Lack of medicine

  • High cost of feed sources

  • Water shortage

  • High cost of water

  • Marketing problems


Part iii weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site1
Part III: weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • III.2 Promising techniques to improve livelihoods (water/soil/crop/social)

  • Water harvesting techniques

  • Improve the vegetation cover

  • Introduce new species of shrubs

  • .

  • Selection and testing of productive, drought tolerant plant varieties

  • Improvement of dry land farming systems (barley, wheat, forages, legumes).

  • Research on existing livestock breeds and ways for improvement .


Part iii weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site2
Part III: weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • III.3 Indicators to evaluate the performance of human development at the benchmark site

  • Baseline information

  • Yield (kg/du)

  • 2. Net Return JD/ du

  • 3. Feeding cost JD/head

  • 4.Total income and per capita income

  • 5. Livestock water cost

  • 6.Water productivity (WP Kg /M3 )


Part i bio physical characterization
Part I: Bio-physical characterization livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • Site name:

    Badia Benchmark site in Jordan

  • Region:

    Site area located in Amman governorate


Part i bio physical characterization1
Part I: Bio-physical characterization livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • I.1 General Information

  • Muhareb watershed is located in the north middle parts of Jordan and occupies around 60 Km2.

  • The watershed lies within the xeric-aridic transitional moisture regime.

  • precipitation range is: from 100 to 150mm.

  • lies within the grassland steppe vegetation zone.

  • Barley is grown in the valley bottom alluvium where the moisture from the limited rainfall is augmented by run-off from the hillslopes.

  • Dominant species are Anabasis and Poa .

  • Frequent grazing keeps vegetation growth close to the soil surface.


Biophysical Characterization livelihoods at the benchmark site

of Muhareb watershed

Purpose:

The purpose of the watershed characterization is to provide data for the selection of sites that are suitable for various water harvesting interventions.



  • Methodology represent the Badia zone in Jordan to carry out the project activities and outscale the results to other similar areas within Jordan and outside the country.

  • Data Collection :The data were delivered from various sources and various formats

  • Available Data

  • Derived data

  • Data collected in the field


AVIALABLE DATA represent the Badia zone in Jordan to carry out the project activities and outscale the results to other similar areas within Jordan and outside the country.

Data from the Royal Jordanian Geographic Center (RJGC)

Contour map elevation data

Streamlines map

Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (20 meter interval)

Note :scale 1:50000


  • Cadastral map for Muhareb watershed represent the Badia zone in Jordan to carry out the project activities and outscale the results to other similar areas within Jordan and outside the country.

  • Cadastral data will be used for many purposes:

  • The area of each parcel was used to identify suitable land for water harvesting as criteria for the selections.

  • to identify the owner(s) of the land for those suitable land for each water harvesting intervention.

  • To provide the socio-economic team with this information to approach the relevant owner(s) to start the negotiation about the implementation stage.


  • Derived data represent the Badia zone in Jordan to carry out the project activities and outscale the results to other similar areas within Jordan and outside the country.

  • Data derived from topographic information

  • The purpose of this subdivision is :

  • to facilitate the selection of suitable watersheds within the whole watershed to undertake special water harvesting interventions, such as small dams and Hafair.

  • to be used extensively in the hydrological analysis for each watershed.

watershed was subdivided into sub-watersheds visually using contour lines and stream lines


slope steepness is one of the most important criteria for the selection and implementation of water harvesting interventions.

Slope map was derived from the DEM. The slope units were used as the basic units to derive suitability map.


  • Data collected in the field the selection and implementation of water harvesting interventions.

  • main limitation: detailed information about the soil in the investigated area is absent.

  • The alternative was the collection of field observations where only relevant soil and site properties were recorded.

A grid of uniform sampling (500m) was used.


  • The following parameters were recorded for each field observation:

  • Slope steepness % :

  • Stoniness percentage: If the land is covered by stone, gravels or boulders .

  • Vegetation type: Natural vegetation or cultivated

  • Vegetation cover percent: Estimate the density of coverage: poor, medium or dense

  • Texture of the surface horizon.

  • Limiting depth (cm): Depth to limiting feature;

  • GPS coordinates: Easting, Northing and elevation


Output: suitability map that indicates observation:possible water harvesting option(s) suitable for each mapping


Surveyor name: Date:

Reference point: Easting= Northing= Elevation=


Part i bio physical characterization2
Part I: Bio-physical characterization Date:

  • I.2 Agro-ecosystem characterization

  • Land use and vegetation

  • The area lies wholly within the xeric-aridic transitional moisture regime. Precipitation in the area ranges between 57-275 mm.

  • The selected watershed lies within the grassland steppe vegetation zone.

  • In this area, barley is grown in the valley bottom alluvium, where the moisture from the limited rainfall received is augmented by runoff from the hillsides. The dominant species in the area are those of the Anabasis and Poa genera.


Vegetation cover of Muhareb catchment Date:

Land use/land cover of Muhareb catchment


Part iii weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site3
Part III: weaknesses and opportunities for improving rural livelihoods at the benchmark site

  • III.4

  • Feed-the-Future (FTF) development indicators

  • prevalence of poverty: percent of people living less than $ 1.25/day

  • Gross margin per unit of land or animal of selected product

  • Number of additional hectares under water harvesting technologies as a result of Project assistant

  • Number of farmers who have adopted water harvesting technologies

  • Number of hectares of farmland registered in the name of user

  • Number of Jobs attributed to project implementation

  • Number of income generating activities for households


List of potential stakeholders at the benchmark site including also ngos
List of potential stakeholders at the benchmark site (including also NGOs)

  • Ministry of Agriculture (MOA)

  • National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension (NCARE)

  • Municipality

  • Cooperatives

  • Farmers / women farmers


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