Did the British public want decolonisation?
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Did the British public want decolonisation? C aim – to explain different attitudes and what impact this had B/A aim – to analyse how far the British public wanted and influenced decolonisation. These images were released in the media. What impact would they have on the British public?.

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Did the British public want decolonisation?C aim – to explain different attitudes and what impact this had B/A aim – to analyse how far the British public wanted and influenced decolonisation

These images were released in the media.

What impact would they have on the British public?


The British public wanted to maintain and develop the empire

The British public wanted decolonisation

What can you add so far?

What can you add from your sheet?


Https www dropbox com s ee313jirk941d5l white 20man 20comments 20on 20black 20vote wmv

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ee313jirk941d5l/WHITE%20MAN%20COMMENTS%20ON%20BLACK%20VOTE.wmvhttps://www.dropbox.com/s/ee313jirk941d5l/WHITE%20MAN%20COMMENTS%20ON%20BLACK%20VOTE.wmv

On the other hand...

There were people who still supported it. Who might they be? Why might they be like this?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_x9jRYU1JU&safe=activehttps://www.dropbox.com/s/ee313jirk941d5l/WHITE%20MAN%20COMMENTS%20ON%20BLACK%20VOTE.wmv

  • Who criticised decolonisation and why?

  • What impact would they have?

  • Some opposed free trade and thought that closer economic integration with the empire-Commonwealth would be better in the 1950s

  • Conservatives won the general election in 1951 including the policy of (however, was this really the reason?)

  • Some said that Britain shouldn’t evacuate Suez in 1956

  • The Monday Club were a white settler lobby who opposed the rapid transfer of power to Africans in Kenya, Northern and Southern Rhodesia.


1944 https://www.dropbox.com/s/ee313jirk941d5l/WHITE%20MAN%20COMMENTS%20ON%20BLACK%20VOTE.wmv- Kenyan African Union (KAU) formed to campaign for African independence. First African appointment to legislative council.

1947 - Jomo Kenyatta becomes KAU leader.

1952 - Secret Kikuyu guerrilla group known as Mau Mau begins violent campaign against white settlers and even prosperous kikuyu who they felt had gone into league with the white settlers. Kikuyu make up 23% of Kenyans. They were removed from their land in the white highlands. State of emergency declared where Kenyan independence leaders were arrested. Kenyatta arrested.

1953 - Kenyatta charged with management of Mau Mau and jailed. KAU banned. Mau Maubrutually suppressed.

1956 - Mau Mau rebellion put down after thousands killed - mainly Africans.

1959 - Kenyatta released from jail but under house arrest.

1960 - State of emergency ends. Britain announces plans to prepare Kenya for majority African rule. Kenya African national Union (Kanu) formed by Tom Mboya and OgingaOdinga.

Independence

1961 - Kenyatta freed and assumes presidency of Kanu.

1963 - Kenya gains independence, with Kenyatta as prime minister.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtQD13faECw


We rebelled to gain independence. The British took our land and we had to fight back. We wanted to get our point across by any means necessary. It was unfair that white settlers had more importance. We did it for the future of the Kenyans. We’re just training to fight. We’re not just taking strange supernatural oaths, we’re just following our indigenous religion to resist the white settlers even further. Your parents may have been born in this house but my ancestors were there before.

I was born in this house...and my parents were born in this house...we have helped the Kenyans and the Kikuyu all our lives. Some even became very wealth from us as we put them in positions of great responsibility. When the Mau Mau came awful things happened. They brought my father in here and beat him in front of us. They then raped my mother. Terrible things... The British government had to do something...We’ve stayed as this is our home. It would be giving in to that terrible time if we left.

Aaron Brown. Kenya.

So... Were the British justified to declare a state of emergency?

Yes – it was a state of emergency, they had to get control, arresting Kenyatta sent a message, putting Mau Mau in camps was a way to get control.

No – it was an inhumane and unproportional reaction. Kenyatta did not lead the Mau Mau.


  • How did Kenya become independent? and we had to fight back. We wanted to get our point across by any means necessary. It was unfair that white settlers had more importance. We did it for the future of the Kenyans. We’re just training to fight. We’re not just taking strange supernatural oaths, we’re just following our indigenous religion to resist the white settlers even further. Your parents may have been born in this house but my ancestors were there before.

    • 1950s Mau Mau rebellon – violent attacks on colonial leaders and white settlers

    • 1952-1956 Mau Mau suppressed. However, it did persuade the British that social, political and agrarian reforms were necessary.

    • 1957 – native leaders elected to Legislative Council.

    • 1960 – majority Africans in the council. Britain started to plan the country’s transition to independence.

    • 1963 – New constitution and elections. KANU got majorities in both houses and Kenyatta became the first PM.

    • 1964 – people were worried it would become a one party state – by 1969 it did.

Summarise the process of Kenya becoming independent in one word for each bullet point.

Use these words to explain how Kenya became independent.

What caused Kenya to become independent?


British public opinion drove decolonisation how far do you agree with this statement
British public opinion drove decolonisation. How far do you agree with this statement?

  • Explaining whether something is important or not


Homework due monday
Homework – Due Monday agree with this statement?

  • Complete reading a write a report on British Public Attitudes and how they impacted decolonisation.

  • Pp. 32-33 decolonisation book


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