Let s learn about bridges
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Let’s Learn About Bridges PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Let’s Learn About Bridges. Simplest bridge form A log across a street was the earliest form of a beam bridge Consists of a horizontal beam supported at each end by a pier The weight of the beam pushes down on the piers The farther apart the piers, the weaker the beams

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Let’s Learn About Bridges

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Let s learn about bridges

Let’s Learn About Bridges


Beam bridge

  • Simplest bridge form

  • A log across a street was the earliest form of a beam bridge

  • Consists of a horizontal beam supported at each end by a pier

  • The weight of the beam pushes down on the piers

  • The farther apart the piers, the weaker the beams

  • Beams can be placed at points other than the beginning and end

  • Usually these bridges are not longer than 250 feet.

Horizontal Beam

Beam Bridge

Pier


Beam bridge examples

Beam bridge examples


Beam bridges

  • Why are these bridges a good idea….

  • Usually pretty easy to build

  • Inexpensive when compared to other bridge types

  • Can be used in rural or urban areas

  • Why are these bridges not such a good idea….

  • Ships cannot go under them

  • Construction not attractive

  • Costly if many piers are needed

  • Concrete used is cheaper but not as strong as steel

Beam Bridges


Truss bridge

  • Made of a series of triangles

  • One of the oldest types of bridges

  • A flat bridge is laid and then supports are built on both sides in triangle shapes both above and below the flat bridge

  • Can be any length

  • Many are railroad bridges

Truss BRidge


Truss bridge1

tRuss bridge


Truss bridge2

  • Why are these bridges a good idea….

  • Very strong

  • Can support heavy loads

  • Made or steel

  • Economical to build

  • Easy to build and design

  • Why are these bridges a bad idea…

  • Difficult to construct

  • Take a lot of time and money to repair

  • Difficult to widen the bridges

  • Not very attractive

Truss Bridge


Arch bridge

  • Difficult to build

  • Built a long time ago by the Romans

  • One of the most popular types of bridges

  • Different styles of arches can be used

  • Some of these bridges were built using stone and have stood the test of time

Arch Bridge


Arch bridge1

Arch Bridge


Arch bridge2

  • Why are these bridges a good idea…

  • Can be made from a wide range of materials including wood, stone, concrete, and steel

  • Considered attractive

  • strong

  • Why are these bridges not such a good idea….

  • Expensive to build

  • Limited to where can be placed because ground needs to be strong enough to support it

Arch Bridge


Suspension bridge

  • These bridges can span 2,000 to 7,000 feet -- much farther than any other type of bridge!

  • Cables are hooked on vertical suspenders that support the road.

  • Found in harbors with lots of boat traffic.

  • Usually longer than other types of bridge.

Suspension Bridge


Suspension bridge1

Suspension Bridge


Suspension bridge2

  • Why are these bridges a good idea…

  • Very strong

  • Can span long distances

  • Attractive

  • Allow boats and ship traffic to pass under them

  • May withstand earthquakes better than other kinds of bridges

  • Why are these bridges not such a good idea….

  • Expensive

  • Long time to build

  • Require large amounts of material

Suspension Bridge


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