Diversity in mch training a peer l earning c ollaborative
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Diversity in MCH Training: A Peer L earning C ollaborative. By: Shanna Vander Galien , APSW PPC Trainee. Overview. Announced in 2009 A MCHB grant funded project Intensive 9-12 month collaborative peer learning process

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Diversity in MCH Training: A Peer L earning C ollaborative

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Diversity in mch training a peer l earning c ollaborative

Diversity in MCH Training: A Peer Learning Collaborative

By: Shanna Vander Galien, APSW

PPC Trainee


Overview

Overview

  • Announced in 2009

  • A MCHB grant funded project

  • Intensive 9-12 month collaborative peer learning process

  • Provides a safe and structured environment to address challenges to racial and ethnic diversity within our training program, staff and faculty through targeted technical assistance and collaboration with peers.


Why is this important a review of the literature

Why is this important? A review of the literature

  • Diversity in the US is increasing

    • In 2000, about 33% of the U.S. population

      identified themselves as members of racial or

      ethnic minority groups. By 2050, it is projected

      that these groups will account for almost half of

      the U.S. population.

      ■ 15% of children are black/African American and 21% are Hispanic.

      Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2010


Why is this important a review of the literature1

Why is this important? A review of the literature

  • The 2006 National Health Disparities Report provides evidence that disparities persist in nearly every aspect of health including:

    • Quality of health care

    • Access to care

    • Utilization of health care

    • Clinical conditions including morbidity and mortality


Why is this important a review of the literature2

Why is this important? A review of the literature

  • Poor cross-cultural communication between health care providers and recipients has been linked to poorer health outcomes and less effective participation in health supporting behaviors.

  • A report for the Bureau of Health Professions indicates that diversity in the health professions has been associated with improved access, utilization and quality of care for diverse populations.

    Rationale for Cultural Competence in Maternal and Child Health Bureau-Funded Training Programs. National Center for Cultural Competence .


Why is this important a review of the literature3

Why is this important? A review of the literature

  • Minority health professionals have been shown to serve other disadvantaged populations to a greater extent than non-minority professionals do, such as being more likely to care for

    • Poor patients

    • Those insured by Medicaid

    • Those without insurance

    • Those living in areas with health professional shortages

      The Rationale for Diversity in the Health Professions: A Review of the Evidence. HRSA, 2006.


Why is this important a review of the literature4

Why is this important? A review of the literature

  • Greater diversity in health professions will likely lead to improved public health by increasing access to care for underserved populations, and by increasing opportunities for minority patients to see practitioners with whom they share a common race, ethnicity or language

    The Rationale for Diversity in the Health Professions: A Review of the Evidence. HRSA, 2006.


A history of the problem

A History of the Problem

  • All-white national and state medical societies banned African Americans even though membership was a pre-requisite to obtaining hospital privileges.

  • Founded in 1847, the AMA did not welcome black doctors until 1968, two years after racial segregation in medical schools legally ended in 1966.

  • Enrollment of minority students in health professions schools increased slightly during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. However, the numbers have failed to keep up with the growth of minority populations.

    Missing Persons: Minorities in the Health Professions


Our goals

Our Goals

  • Continue and enhance current recruitment efforts to ensure racial and ethnic diversity amongst training grant/clinical faculty and staff.

  • Continue and enhance current recruitment efforts to ensure racial and ethnic diversity amongst trainees.

  • Gain guidance on developing a diversity recruitment plan to ensure racial and ethnically within MCH Region V training programs.


Diversity in mch training a peer l earning c ollaborative

Continue and enhance current recruitment efforts to ensure racial and ethnic diversity amongst training grant/clinical faculty and staff.

  • Participate in Peer Learning Collaborative

    • DC kick off meeting- developed goals/plan

    • Participated in webinars

    • Had home group in person meetings

  • Provide ongoing cultural competency to faculty and staff

  • Expand recruitment efforts

  • Create a packet of recruitment materials, including resources in Madison

  • Collaborate with campus diversity entities

    • PEOPLE, Pipeline, Office of Equity and Diversity


Diversity in mch training a peer l earning c ollaborative

Continue and enhance current recruitment efforts to ensure racial and ethnic diversity amongst trainees.

  • Worked with diversity entities on campus

  • Continued and increased pipeline activities

  • Attended the LSWO Conference in Chicago

  • Created recruitment materials

  • Established relationships with human resource personnel at different entities


Diversity in mch training a peer l earning c ollaborative

Gain guidance on developing a diversity recruitment plan to ensure racial and ethnically within MCH Region V training programs

  • Participated in Peer Learning Collaborative

    • Received technical assistance from Altarum/MCHB

  • Identified MCH training grantees within Region V

  • Identify and share recruitment efforts and strategies with MCH training grantees in Region V

    • Attended Diversity Summit

    • LSWO Conference


What i h ave l earned

What I Have Learned

  • I have learned about health disparities and the MCHB’s role in decreasing these

  • I learned how health disparities impact our patients and how increasing diversity in our faculty, staff and trainees can reduce this burden

  • I have learned how difficult it can be to change the culture of an institution, but it IS possible


What i have learned cont d

What I Have Learned Cont’d

  • Works well to have people from many different perspectives working on the project

  • Difficult to coordinate many different schedules

  • Works well to have the technical support and guidance of previous group, Altarium and MCHB leaders


Moving forward

Moving Forward

  • Create a paid position to carry on the work of the Peer Learning Collaborative

  • Include someone from human resources or higher up in the organization as a part of the team

  • This is an important issue for our patients and therefore it is important to carry on the work of the PLC


What can we all do

What Can We All Do?

  • Be aware

  • Educate yourself

  • Educate others

    • Bring attention to the subject of Health Disparities within your institution and encourage institutional by-in.

  • Volunteer/be a mentor

  • Be on a hiring committee

  • Advocate


  • Login