Evolution of slip at catholic regional college melton
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Evolution of SLIP at Catholic Regional College Melton. 2012 Victorian Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat National Partnerships Schools’ Forum. What was SLIP about?. Approached to join SLIP. Stats that matter. Understanding our goal. New idea’s. Benefits of SLIP. Improved Teaching.

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Evolution of SLIP at Catholic Regional College Melton

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Evolution of slip at catholic regional college melton

Evolution of SLIP at Catholic Regional College Melton

2012 Victorian Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat National Partnerships Schools’ Forum


What was slip about

What was SLIP about?

  • Approached to join SLIP.

  • Stats that matter.

  • Understanding our goal.

  • New idea’s.


Benefits of slip

Benefits of SLIP

  • Improved Teaching.

  • Development of Leadership Skills.

  • Passing on Knowledge.

  • Improved confidence and motivation.


Asfla conference 2011

ASFLA Conference 2011

  • As a teacher and a member of SLIP:

    • I could recognise idea’s delivered in the lectures and relate them to my teaching.

    • This information supported some of the changes I have attempted in the classroom.

    • By connecting this research with my teaching, it gave me confidence to continue to develop my techniques by taking risks with my teaching.


What did i learn

What did I learn?

  • I took a great deal of interest in the three presentations that discussed Semantic Waves.

    • Karl Maton is an expert on the topic, he discussed the theoretical research behind it before giving actual examples which relate to the classroom.


What are semantic waves

What Are Semantic Waves?

  • Summary:

    • Basically, relating the theory learnt in the classroom and how it is used in the real world and vice versa.

    • What we need to know throughout our lives and then relating this to the curriculum in the classroom.

    • Going back and forth between the two gives students a healthy semantic range creating a wave. (Unpacking and repacking information).


Examples unpacking

Examples - Unpacking

  • Let’s use the term Ratio.

    • Begin with the term.

  • ‘When do we use ratio’s?’

    • Use student examples.

    • Relate it to the real world.

    • Unpacking.

  • Gambling, Recipes, etc.

    • Discuss how it is used.


Examples repacking

Examples - Repacking

  • Then we give the term ratio a clear and detailed meaning.

    (Teacher writes on the board for students)


Semantic waves

Semantic Waves

SG-, SD+

SG+, SD-

Repacking of descriptions into table.

Conceptual term

Unpacking of term using previously learnt terms, everyday language and body language, including an example from everyday life.


Semantic waves use

Semantic Waves USE

  • Semantic waves are created using two measurements:

    • Semantic Gravity – degree to which the meaning relates to its context in the real world.

    • Semantic Density - degree of condensation of the meaning. (Refers to the number, clarity and detail of meanings).

  • Both may be stronger (+) or weaker (-) along a continuum of strengths.


Semantic range

Semantic Range

Weaker SG

  • Detailed, clear, many meanings:

    • Weaker SG= the less meaning is dependent on its context.

    • Stronger SD= more meanings are condensed.

  • Relating to the real world:

    • Stronger SG= more closely meaning relates to its context.

    • Weaker SD= fewer meanings are condensed.

Stronger SD

Stronger SG

Weaker SD


Semantic gravity

Semantic Gravity

  • Strengthening semantic gravity

    • e.g. moving down from an abstract concept to concrete examples of that concept.

  • Weakening semantic gravity

    • e.g. abstracting generalising principles from the concrete particulars of a specific context or case.


Semantic density

Semantic Density

  • Weakening semantic density.

    • e.g. ‘unpacking’ a dense concept into everyday language.

  • Strengthening semantic density.

    • e.g. Condensing a large range of meanings into a symbol or technical term


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