Increasing feed grain production in north carolina
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Increasing Feed Grain Production in North Carolina. Wesley Everman Extension Weed Specialist Department of Crop Science. Need. Currently NC imports over 300 million bushels of corn for use as livestock feed NC only produced 88 million bushels of corn in 2010

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Increasing Feed Grain Production in North Carolina

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Increasing feed grain production in north carolina

Increasing Feed Grain Production in North Carolina

Wesley Everman

Extension Weed Specialist

Department of Crop Science


Increasing feed grain production in north carolina

Need

  • Currently NC imports over 300 million bushels of corn for use as livestock feed

  • NC only produced 88 million bushels of corn in 2010

  • NC produced 14 million bushels of wheat in 2010


Increasing feed grain production in north carolina

Need

  • 300 – 100 = Net Deficit in Feed Grain

  • NC animal agriculture at a competitive disadvantage

  • Potential for increased domestic grain sales and reduced costs for animal industry

    Win - Win


Goals

Goals

  • Improve efficiencies

  • Increase local supplies of feed grains

  • Identify cropping systems with an immediate impact on feed grain production

  • Outreach activities


Approach

Approach

  • Improved agronomic practices

  • Economics, budgets, risk management

  • Strategies for drying, storing, & delivering

  • Novel crops – including ‘old crops’

  • Potential double-crop rotations


Improved agronomic practices

Improved Agronomic Practices

  • Enhancing wheat yields

    • Agronomic practices (row spacing, populations)

    • Grower practices (time of planting, management)

  • Make wheat a “primary” crop


Economics

Economics

  • New enterprise budgets

  • Evaluate and enhance drying, storage, and delivery capacities

  • Overall goal to retain feed produced in NC


Novel crops

Novel crops

  • Sorghum production

    • Agronomic practices

  • Canola, rapeseed

    • Is there a fit?

  • Others


Double crop rotations

Double-crop Rotations

  • Wheat rotated with:

    • Sorghum

    • Corn

    • Soybeans

  • Triticale as a winter grain?

    • Need for seed

  • Canola, rapeseed

    • Potential rotation crop, benefits


Outreach activities

Outreach Activities

  • Strategic Partnerships

    • North Carolina Cooperative Extension

    • North Carolina Department of Agriculture

    • NC Small Grain Growers Association

    • Industry representatives


Outreach activities1

Outreach Activities

  • Present Best Management Practices

    • Grower meetings, field days, farmer groups

  • Educational materials available:

    • Small Grain Production Guide

    • Bulletins on sorghum production

    • Virtual training online planned


Outcomes

Outcomes

  • Improved efficiencies

  • Increase local supplies of feed grains

  • Implementation of cropping systems with an immediate impact on feed grain production

  • Increased awareness through outreach activities


Nc state faculty involved

NC State Faculty involved

  • Michele Marra

  • Nick Piggott

  • Kelly Zering

  • Ron Heiniger

  • Chris Reberg-Horton

  • Randy Weisz


Sorghum weed management

Sorghum Weed Management


Weed management options

Weed Management Options

Start clean!!!!

  • Herbicide burndown

    • Gramoxone, glyphosate, or Ignite

  • Cultural

    • Tillage

    • row spacing

    • planting date


Weed management options1

Weed Management Options

Very limited options:

  • PRE Herbicides

  • Cultivation

  • POST Herbicides


Burndown herbicide options

Burndown Herbicide Options

  • Gramoxone SL

    • 2 – 3 pt/A

  • Glyphosate

    • No glyphosate resistant weeds present

  • Ignite

    • 32 oz/A


Weed management options2

Weed Management Options

  • Should achieve excellent broadleaf control

    • Palmer amaranth

    • Morningglories

    • Ragweed

  • Grass control will be greatest concern

    • Large crabgrass

    • Johnsongrass

    • Panicums


Pre herbicide options

PRE Herbicide Options

  • Atrazine

    • 1 qt/A (save second qt/A for POST)

  • Dual II Magnum, Outlook, Intrro, other PRE grass herbicides

    • Use full PRE rate for longer grass and pigweed control


Post herbicide options

POST Herbicide Options

  • Atrazine 1.2 qt/A

    (do not apply > 2.5 qt atrazine/yr)

  • 2,4-D 0.5 pt/A

  • Dicamba 0.5 pt/A

  • Buctril 1.5 pt/A

  • Basagran 1.5 pt/A

  • Aim 0.5 oz/A

  • Linex (LAYBY only) 1 pt/A


Weed management goals

Weed Management Goals

  • Research additional MOAs for sorghum

  • Investigate most effective cultural practices

    • tillage

    • planting date

    • row spacing


Questions

Questions?


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