Principles of         Education and Training

Principles of Education and Training PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Principles of Education and Training

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1. Principles of Education and Training Chapter 1: Teaching as a Profession

2. Teaching as a Profession Give examples of how the qualities of effective teachers apply in actual classroom situations Analyze challenges related to teaching and how teachers meet them Identify the educational requirements for teachers at various levels

3. Teaching as a Profession Effective teachers come in many forms (outgoing and dramatic, demanding and firm, soft-spoken and reflective, or introverted and quiet) However, all effective teachers are able to: Motivate, inspire, and influence their students Communicate well with students and adults Convey their enthusiasm for learning Be well organized

4. Teaching as a Profession Effective teachers share these personal qualities: Caring Committed Courteous Honest Respectful High expectations

5. Teaching as a Profession Most of the day is spent designing and presenting classroom learning experiences Creativity and knowledge of students’ learning styles and abilities is necessary If classes are small or time permits—they may work with students individually Assess students learning Grade assignments and evaluate student participation in class activities

6. Teaching as a Profession Teachers don’t just teach whatever they want! They must follow the curriculum—courses taught, what is taught in each course, and the course sequence. Influences on curriculum include: National Curriculum Standards Use of these is voluntary, but have significant influence State Curriculum Standards Makes sure students are ready to advance to the next level of courses, even if they move to another school

7. Teaching as a Profession Teaching is inspiring, challenging, and as unique as each student Teaching makes a difference in the world! Teachers see their students change—grow physically, emotionally, and socially. They see their students learn day by day. They see students develop new knowledge, skills, and confidence and this can be the most rewarding part of teaching.

8. Teaching as a Profession Teachers work hard! They spend long hours outside of school preparing lessons and grading student work. They are often spend vacations thinking ahead and planning. This can also include: attending conferences or workshops and taking classes toward an advanced degree. Conditions aren’t always ideal Classes can be large Old school buildings

9. Teaching as a Profession Schools reflect the problems of society Poverty, alcohol and other drug abuse, etc. affect students and can thus make teaching emotionally draining Teachers may face disrespect, unruly behavior, and even violence in schools Effective teachers must find strategies to help them deal with problems they encounter.

10. Teaching as a Profession You may be surprised to know it’s not just schools! However, most teachers do teach in schools.

11. Teaching as a Profession However, variations are fairly common.

12. Teaching as a Profession

13. Teaching as a Profession CDA—Child Development Associate—designation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children Paraprofessional—for those with less education or experience and work under the supervision of a more highly educated professional See Chart 1-5 for help in understanding academic degrees (Page 24 of student text)CDA—Child Development Associate—designation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children Paraprofessional—for those with less education or experience and work under the supervision of a more highly educated professional See Chart 1-5 for help in understanding academic degrees (Page 24 of student text)

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34. End of Chapter One

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