Condom use results from the 2004 malawi demographic and health survey how do men and women differ
Download
1 / 15

Jesman Chintsanya - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 110 Views
  • Uploaded on

Condom use results from the 2004 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey: how do men and women differ?. Jesman Chintsanya. Malawi. Population: 13 million 85% of population lives in rural areas GDP per capita: $160 Life expectancy: 41yrs Total fertility rate: 6.0.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Jesman Chintsanya' - kalea


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Condom use results from the 2004 malawi demographic and health survey how do men and women differ

Condom use results from the 2004 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

Jesman Chintsanya


Malawi
Malawi Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

Population: 13 million

85% of population lives in rural areas

GDP per capita: $160

Life expectancy: 41yrs

Total fertility rate: 6.0

Introduction Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion


Introduction
Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

  • Almost quarter a century has passed since the first HIV case was identified in Malawi 1985

  • one million young and adult population affected by HIV/AIDS.

  • adult population prevalence rate is 14.2 percent

  • disproportionate prevalence rates with women representing 56.8 percent of all HIV positive adults (MDHS, 2000).


Hiv in malawi
HIV in Malawi Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

14% HIV prevalence (15-49yo)

About 1 million infected

Introduction Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

MDHS 2004


Introduction1
Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

  • many reasons cited for this disparity,

    • cultural practices

    • early exposure to sex.


Condom use within marriage
Condom use within marriage Health Survey: how do men and women differ?

Considered by many as a violation of trust

The decision to use condoms within marriage requires a manifestation of trust and love (Tavory and Swidler 2008)

Referred to as an “intruder in marriage” (Chimbiri 2007)

cheated out of their right to a high-grade sexual experience (Zulu, 2002)

Introduction Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ? Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

2004 Malawi Demographic Health Survey (MDHS)

  • Analysis is from 2004 MDHS Interviewed women ( n = 11,698) and men (n = 3,261) aged 15-49 and 15-54 respectively.

  • Dependent variable: condom use, defined as men and women reported to have used a condom at last sex 12 months before the survey


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ? Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

2004 Malawi Demographic Health Survey (MDHS)

  • Independent Variables:

    • Own health, Making large purchases, Making daily purchases and Visits to family or relatives

  • Control variables

    age (age at last birthday), marital status, level of school, wealth quintile, residence and employment status.


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ? Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

  • The analyses were completed using three methods of analyses; descriptive, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.

  • Multivariate logistic regression models were used for men and women separately to determine individual characteristics related to condom use.


Introduction methods and data results discussion conclusion
Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ? Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

  • Model 2 includes the control variables that were significant in the first model.

  • Model 3 assesses the best model that best predicts the likelihood of using a condom.


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ? Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

Table 1.Shows a profile of respondents on condom use at last sex the past 12 months by sex.

Table 2. Odds Ratios of Logistic Regression on condom use at last sex intercourse regresses on selected variables by sex


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ?Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

  • making the final decision on large household purchase, small household purchase, visit to family or relatives and own health are negatively associated with using a condom at last sex

  • Women who were widowed or separated and unmarried were more likely to use a condom

  • Women who had no education were less likely to use a condom

  • Women with higher economic status, though not significant, were more likely to use a condom.


Introduction Health Survey: how do men and women differ?Methods and Data Results Discussion Conclusion

  • Women were less likely to use a condom if they did not have the decision making power.

  • Largest predictor for condom use, for women, is residence and marital status while for men is residence and age.


Implies that there are factors that determine a woman to use a condom vary for people, in marital and non-marital relationships.

Thus we have to look for other factors if we are to understand condom use and autonomy dynamics as demonstrated in the second model for the woman sample.

How can we best ask questions about condom use in non-marital and marital partnerships?

Introduction Methods and Data Results Discussion/Conclusion


Limitations
Limitations a condom vary for people, in marital and non-marital relationships.

Absence of reliable data on actual condom use

Concerns about validity of self-reports

Introduction Methods and Data Results Discussion/Conclusion


ad