Boundary layer meteorology l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

Boundary Layer Meteorology PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 184 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Boundary Layer Meteorology. Prof. Daniel Kirk-Davidoff Rm. 3423 CSS (301)-270-3704 [email protected] Lecture 1 8/31/04. Course Syllabus: discuss requirements, schedule, readings. Starting Point Exam Introduction to the Boundary Layer Hand out readings.

Download Presentation

Boundary Layer Meteorology

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Boundary layer meteorology l.jpg

Boundary Layer Meteorology

Prof. Daniel Kirk-Davidoff

Rm. 3423 CSS

(301)-270-3704

[email protected]


Lecture 1 8 31 04 l.jpg

Lecture 1 8/31/04

  • Course Syllabus: discuss requirements, schedule, readings.

  • Starting Point Exam

  • Introduction to the Boundary Layer

  • Hand out readings


Introduction to the boundary layer l.jpg

Introduction to the Boundary Layer

Definitions:

Stull:“that part of the troposphere that is directly influenced by the presence of the earth’s surface, and responds to surface forcings with a timescale of about an hour or less”


Introduction to the boundary layer4 l.jpg

Introduction to the Boundary Layer

Definitions:

Garratt:“the layer of air directly above the Earth’s surface in which the effects of the surface (friction, heating and cooling [and moistening]) are felt directly on time scales of less than a day, and in which significant fluxes of momentum, heat or matter are carried by turbulent motions on a scale of the order of the depth of the boundary layer or less.”


Things that happen in the boundary layer l.jpg

Things that happen in the boundary layer

  • Large diurnal temperature variations (relative to the free troposphere above).

    • Turbulence

  • Sources of turbulence:

  • Thermal forcing (thermals: buoyant eddies forced by solar heating of the surface)

  • Vertical wind shear (due to frictional drag by the surface on geostrophic flow aloft)


Things that happen in the boundary layer6 l.jpg

Things that happen in the boundary layer

  • Horizontal wind shear (due to flow of wind around obstacles: trees, mountains, islands)

  • Waves (gravity)

  • Spiraling Winds

  • Katabatic (drainage) Winds

  • Nocturnal Jet


Things that happen in the boundary layer7 l.jpg

Things that happen in the boundary layer

  • Clouds:

  • Fair weather cumulus clouds (whose roots are in the BL)

  • Trade cumulus (which may rain)

  • Stratocumulus clouds (which may rain)

  • Fog


Kinds of atmospheric boundary layers l.jpg

Kinds of atmospheric boundary layers

  • Stable

  • Near-Neutral

  • Convective


Kinds of atmospheric boundary layers9 l.jpg

Kinds of atmospheric boundary layers


Read ch 1 of garratt and answer l.jpg

Read ch. 1 of Garratt, and answer:

  • Why is the mean structure of the boundary layer “very much dependent on the season”?

  • When and why is the structure of the boundary layer over the ocean similar to that over land “in extra-tropical latitudes”?

  • Otherwise, why is the marine boundary layer usually shallower than over the land?


Read ch 1 of garratt and answer11 l.jpg

Read ch. 1 of Garratt, and answer:

  • Why is “information on the likely growth of the shallow mixed layer” of particular importance to the dispersal of smog and low-level pollutants?

  • How does dewfall and frost formation depend on the state of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL)?


Read ch 1 of garratt and answer12 l.jpg

Read ch. 1 of Garratt, and answer:

  • Why is w’ anticorrelated with any other property fluctuation in figure 1.4?


  • Login