Florida s Frameworks for  K   12 Gifted Learners:

Florida s Frameworks for K 12 Gifted Learners: PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Florida s Frameworks for K 12 Gifted Learners:

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1. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: An Orientation from the WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007

2. Florida’s Frameworks

3. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Introduction

4. Sharing Goals Inspiration never stands alone Knowledge is humanly constructed This process over time Your input into what we bring today June 2006 October 2006 All of us are smarter than any one of us

5. Objectives for today Create a personal, cognitive space for understanding the potential of the frameworks Explore the tapestry of the frameworks, especially through the threads of content, process, affect, and product Describe the hierarchy of assessment: know, understand, perform, accomplish Experience the frameworks by assessing three separate units for Gifted Learners

6. How We Know What We Know Intuition Experience Intentional Professional Growth Specific Focused Assessment Professional and Personal Reflection Access to Accepted Guidelines

7. How We Use What We Know Trial and Error Experimentation Flexible Application Juxtaposition with Established Practices All of us are smarter than any one of us

8. To Know and Use the Frameworks Seven Goals Twenty-two objectives Sixty-six traits Brought together through a co-constructed process to provide coordinators, administrators, teachers, parents, and students significant insights on the nature of a Gifted Learning Program

9. To Know and Use the Frameworks Each goal, objective, and trait is measured through a four-tiered scale: Know Understand Perform Accomplish

10. To Know and Use the Frameworks These levels avail stakeholders to two significant processes: Assess the work and growth of the student, through time, as she develops cognitively and affectively Assess the structure and potential of a lesson, unit, and/or course in its ability to avail students with the opportunities to work and grow cognitively and affectively

11. Weaving the Goals Together Avoid imagining a list of goals Always work with at least two simultaneously Three can be better Four may be too many Five, six, and seven are too many for any one lesson Though all seven should be addressed in any one unit

12. Weaving the Goals Together Program Goals One and Two are driven by content thinking Program Goals Three and Four are driven by process thinking Program Goals Five and Six are driven by affect thinking Program Goal Seven is driven by product thinking

16. Weaving the Goals Together

17. Objectives for today Create a personal, cognitive space for understanding the potential of the frameworks Explore the tapestry of the frameworks, especially through the threads of content, process, affect, and product Describe the hierarchy of assessment: know, understand, perform, accomplish Experience the frameworks by assessing three separate units for Gifted Learners

18. Visual Model of Program Goals – Usable Bundles

19. Checklist for Challenge and Rigor

20. Checklist for Challenge and Rigor

21. WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

22. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 1

23. Looking at the Goals Goal One: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to critically examine the complexity of knowledge: the location, definition, and organization of a variety of fields of knowledge.

24. Why Examine Knowledge? All fields of human understanding rest on enduring knowledge Knowledge is a system of understanding Gifted learners need to examine their own epistemology to self actualize Understanding the structure of knowledge (location, definition & organization of a field) gives meaning to complex phenomena

25. Student Outcomes Goal One Objective 2: The student will identify and illustrate basic principles and the foundational concepts that are central to understanding the essence of a field

26. OBJECTIVE 2: The student will identify and illustrate basic principles and the foundational concepts that are central to understanding the essence of a field of study.

27. WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

28. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 2

29. Looking at the Goals Goal Two: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to create, adapt, and assess multifaceted questions in a variety of fields/disciplines.

30. Why Focus on Questioning? Developing skills to construct, refine, and evaluate questions is a major goal of education.

31. Why Focus on Questioning? Inquiry drives learning, frames curiosity, and connects topics.

32. Why Focus on Questioning? For gifted students, critical inquiry is a key to discovering deeper and clearer perspectives.

33. Student Outcomes Goal Two Objective Two: Generate significant questions within and across disciplines.

34. Objective 2: The student will generate significant questions within and across disciplines

35. WOGI Summer Institute 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

36. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 3

37. Looking at the Goals Goal Three: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to conduct thoughtful research/exploration in multiple fields.

38. Why Research Skills? Research skills include both research done for academic pursuits as well as that which is pursued for personal interest.

39. Why Research Skills? Skills of analysis, of discerning the importance and nature of differing sources, and of the pursuit of further study are all significant parts of the activities that embody research.

40. Why Research Skills? Gifted learners should be encouraged to investigate those areas and ideas they find fascinating. Important here is the idea that research should be conducted in multiple fields/disciplines.

41. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Use a variety of research tools and methodologies Use and manipulate information sources Detect bias and reliability in the process of research Apply ethical standards to research and analyses

42. Student Outcomes Goal Three Objective 3: The student will detect bias in the process of research.

43. Objective 3: The student will detect bias in the process of research.

44. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

45. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 4

46. Looking at the Goals Goal Four: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to think creatively and critically to identify and solve real-world problems.

47. Why Creative and Critical Thinking? Divergent views are the mainstay of teamwork and team-based learning, enhancing the process of problem finding

48. Why Creative and Critical Thinking? Multiple information sources can be included into action plans that use broad arching evidence and seek acceptance from multiple audiences, leading to consensus rather than compromise

49. Why Creative and Critical Thinking? Learning to synthesize multiple viewpoints is important in continuing cognitive growth as well as engendering a more positive acceptance of viewpoints that differ from one’s own thinking

50. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Identify and investigate a problem and generate supportive arguments from multiple perspectives of a complex issue

51. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Analyze the relevance, reliability, and usefulness of data to draw conclusions and forecast effective solutions

52. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Use and evaluate various problem-solving methods to determine effectiveness in solving real-world problems

53. Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to use and evaluate various problem-solving methods to determine effectiveness in solving real-world problems.

54. WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

55. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 5

56. Looking at the Goals Goal Five: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to assume leadership and participatory roles in both gifted and heterogeneous group learning situations.

57. Why Leadership and Participation? Speaks to the social nature of learning and its relationship to leadership

58. Why Leadership and Participation? Intellectual power is not just found in isolated segments of cognitive thought, but is found in relationships with family, friends, mentors, and with everyone who shares social contact with the individual.

59. Why Leadership and Participation? Recognizing that some situations require an individual to ‘step up’ and assume a leadership role while other situations equally demand more of a following frame of mind is an essential skill in navigating social interactions.

60. Why Leadership and Participation? When gifted learners get together, it is important for them to understand that through the art of weaving relationships, we learn how to work with others towards common goals.

61. Student Objectives Objective 1: Accept divergent views to positively affect change.

62. Student Objectives Objective 2: The student will identify leadership traits and qualities as they appear in different individuals and situations.

63. Student Objectives Objective 3: Manifest significant leadership skills and organize group(s) to achieve project goals.

64. Common Struggle Between Leading and Following Must understand that the struggle ends when the art of weaving relationships is perfected. Must learn to work with others towards common goals, leading and following.

65. OBJECTIVE 2: The student will identify leadership traits and qualities as they appear in different individuals and situations.

66. Diversity Know: Identifies in individuals the qualities of empathy and sensitivity to the ideas of others Example: “In my brainstorming session concerning how to address the discrimination of the homeless, I observed varying degrees of compassion for the homeless.” Understand: Promotes diversity in talents and intellectual abilities of each member of the group Example: “As I examined the project to eliminate discrimination against the homeless, I discovered it helpful to survey the group concerning their individual strengths and interests. From that survey I assigned specific tasks based on their individual strengths.”

67. Diversity Perform: Displays flexibility when incorporating individual beliefs and values toward goal attainment Example: “As I addressed the discrimination of the homeless, I immediately recognized that my middle class values and beliefs were inconsistent with my goal objective. As my group worked towards meeting our goal, we examined the values of those in poverty and addressed the issue of discrimination from a values perspective.” Accomplish: Analyzes diverse leadership styles of outstanding leaders and evaluates the impact to one’s own personnel leadership skills Example: “I can give you research on Abraham Lincoln’s leaderships skills and in particular his ability to secure advice of men who were as strong or stronger than himself. As I develop my leadership skills in the quest to end discrimination of the homeless in our community, I successfully employed Lincoln’s strategy. I did so by …………..”

68. WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

69. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 6

70. Looking at the Goals Goal Six: By graduation, the student identified as gifted will be able to set and achieve personal, academic and career goals.

71. Why Personal and Academic Goals? Self-reflective abilities engender stronger metacognitive skills and work to enhance traits of life long learning.

72. Why Personal and Academic Goals? Being able to understand and describe both strengths and weaknesses allows a learner to navigate the paths toward higher learning with better success.

73. Why Personal and Academic Goals? Gifted learners must continue to develop even after formal, institutional learning has ended.

74. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Identify personal strengths and weaknesses and accept challenges in both areas to maximize learning

75. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Assume primary responsibility for learning, including identifying needs and setting reasonable goals

76. Student Objectives: The gifted student will: Design plans of action to address benefits and obstacles in achieving goals of personal interest

77. Student Objectives Objective 2: The student will assume primary responsibility for learning, including identifying needs and setting goals

78. Objective 2: The student will assume primary responsibility for learning, including identifying needs and setting goals.

79. WOGI Summer Institute June 4/5, 2007 Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Learners: An Orientation . . . of sorts

80. Florida’s Frameworks for K – 12 Gifted Learners: Goal 7

81. Looking at the Goals Goal Seven: By graduation the student identified as gifted will be able to develop and deliver a variety of authentic products/performances that demonstrate understanding in multiple fields/disciplines.

82. Why Authentic Performances? Learning is too often driven by one-dimensional assignments that require minimal modes of cognition and expression.

83. Why Authentic Performances? Students should be encouraged to explore creative expression through a variety of cognitive avenues.

84. Why Authentic Performances? Presentations of cognitive and affective growth should unite problem solving systems within the various areas of human expression and thought.

85. Goal Seven is designed : to be used in conjunction with Goals one through six and integrates the other goals. to establish highest quality design for student products.

86. Goal Seven : defines production and/or presentation that aspires to meet professional standards and multiple dimensions. encourages the creative expression of ideas and in responding to audiences.

87. Student Outcomes Program Goal Seven Objective 1: The student will develop products that communicate expertise in multiple fields and disciplines to a variety of authentic audiences.

88. Student Outcomes Program Goal Seven Objective 2: The student will create products that synthesize information from multiple sources illustrating solutions to real-life problems.

89. Objective 2: The student will create products that synthesize information from multiple sources illustrating solutions to real-life problems.

90. Student sounds like traits …

91. Credits Task Force Members  Christine L. Weber, Ph.D. co-chair; University of North Florida Ben Graffam, Ph. D. co-chair; University of South Florida Mary Anne Handley member; Lake Highland Preparatory School, Orlando Willis Henderson member; Escambia County Public Schools Martha Kesler member; Orange County Public Schools Jodi O’Meara member ; FDLRS—Manatee County Public Schools Marty Orr member; Retired, Marion County Public Schools Suzanne Rawlins member; Volusia County Public Schools Laurel Stanley, Ed.D. member; University of North Florida Video Credits Ben Graffam, Ph. D.                    Willis Henderson                         Martha Kesler          Jodi O’Meara                              Suzanne Rawlins                 Video Production/Editing Terence W. Cavanaugh, Ph.D. Christine L. Weber, Ph.D.

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