The effects of the fight against early school-leaving: Back to education or school-to-work transitio...
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 9

Pierre-Yves Bernard & Christophe Michaut Centre de recherche en éducation de Nantes (CREN) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 51 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

The effects of the fight against early school-leaving: Back to education or school-to-work transition?. Pierre-Yves Bernard & Christophe Michaut Centre de recherche en éducation de Nantes (CREN). www.univ-nantes.fr. Introduction. A french paradox:

Download Presentation

Pierre-Yves Bernard & Christophe Michaut Centre de recherche en éducation de Nantes (CREN)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The effects of the fight against early school-leaving: Back to education or school-to-work transition?

Pierre-Yves Bernard & Christophe Michaut

Centre de recherche en éducation de Nantes (CREN)

www.univ-nantes.fr


Introduction

  • A french paradox:

  • 17% of young people leaving the education system with no qualifications

  • But

  • A large range of schemes addressing early school-leaving


Labour market

Missions locales (young people who left school for at least six months)

MGI (students aged 16 and +)

Prevention schemes (compulsory school) : réseaux d’aides, PRE, dispositifs relais, …

Educational system


The study

  • A longitudinal investigation involving young people identified by the Mission Générale d’Insertion (MGI)

  • Sample size: 1501

  • Variables:

  • independent variables:

  • socio-demographic characteristics (age, sex, parents’ social background, ethnic origin, family circumstances),

  • experiences at school (academic performance, study options, approach to learning and relationship with figures in the school environment)

  • programme followed or not

  • dependent variable:

  • young people’s pathways for three years


Results (1):The routes taken by young people leaving the scheme


Results (1):The routes taken by young people leaving the scheme


Results(2): Effects of the scheme on young people’s pathways

  • Effects of young people’s social andindividual characteristics:

  • Sex: girls more likely to follow an uncertainty pathway than a stable employment pathway, and an education/training pathway rather than an employment pathway

  • Age: the younger the participant, the higher the probability of following an education/training pathway

  • Nationality: having a father who was born abroadreduces the probability of being in the "employment" pathway rather than any other pathway, and increases the probability of the "education/training" and the "education/training then employment" pathways

  • Socio-professional background: children of executives and middle-earning professions more likely than others to be in "education/training"

  • Level of education when joining the scheme: the lowest levels of education or training (leaving school at collège level) reduce the probability of following an education/training pathway; the highest level of education or training reduces the risk of following the unemployment pathway.


Results(2): Effects of the scheme on young people’s pathways

  • Effects of the scheme:

  • a protection from unemployment;

  • Effects of the type of programme:

  • Studying for a vocational qualification is a move away from education and towards employment whereas studying for the baccalaureate has the opposite effect

  • Effects according the level of education when joining the scheme:

  • following an MGI programme has no significant impact on the young people’s pathways when they have a very low level.

  • The MGI encourages the return to education or training for the others.


Conclusion

  • A huge uncertainty in the pathways of early school-leavers beginning their professional integration

  • Fight against underachieving must provide effective prevention of early school leaving by giving all young people basic knowledge and skills

  • Securing the pathways of young people in the labour market is essential to make effective integration initiatives possible


  • Login