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Warm-up: Unscramble the words to make a complete, logical thought. poem structure arrangement the is of the in poem a the lines of a. Answer: The structure of a poem is the arrangement of the lines in a poem. Additionally: Structure is often easy to identify. The lines act like sentences.

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Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

Warm-up: Unscramble the words to make a complete, logical thought.

  • poem structure arrangement the is of the in poem a the lines of a

Answer: The structure of a poem is the arrangement of the lines in a poem.

  • Additionally:

  • Structure is often easy to identify.

  • The lines act like sentences.

  • The stanzas act like paragraphs.

  • Their arrangement gives the poems structure.


Poetry structure reference coach georgia gps edition

Poetry StructureReference: “Coach” – Georgia GPS Edition

Lesson 43


Standards

Standards

  • 9RL1.P.a: The student identifies and responds to the aesthetic effects of subject matter (i.e., topic, theme), sound devices (i.e., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme), figurative language (i.e., personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole), and structure (i.e., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric) in a variety of poems.

  • 9RL1.P.b: The student sorts and classifies poems by specified criteria (i.e., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric, and/or universal themes and topics).


Look at these two poems which one has fixed form and which one has free form

Look at these two poems. Which one has fixed form and which one has free form?

  • Fixed Form:

  • There is a repeating pattern.

  • Certain words may rhyme or sound alike

  • Length & rhythm of each stanza are related

  • Number of syllables can be fixed

  • Like a song

Listen my children, and you shall hear

Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;

Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.

April is the cruelest month, breeding

Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing

Memory and desire, stirring

Dull roots with spring rain

  • Free Form:

  • Lacks structure or pattern

  • Words don’t necessarily rhyme

  • Lines don’t match in number of syllables, length, or rhythms

  • Creates other effects through a wide variety of approaches


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

Narrative Poems

  • They contain an expression of the poet’s feelings and thoughts.

  • They are often romantic or descriptive poems.

  • Elegies, odes, and sonnets are lyric poems.

Lyric Poetry

  • They describe the purpose behind the writing.

  • A poet uses narrative structure to tell a STORY!!!!!

  • Other Notes;

  • Many poems contain universal themes that have been important to humans for centuries. They are based on topics like love, family, loyalty, bravery, and great achievements. Some types of poetry tend to feature certain themes. Narrative poetry often tells of great adventures and accomplishments. Lyric poetry is often about love.


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

“The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary

Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, -

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,

As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.

“Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door;

Only this and nothing more.”

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December

And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor

Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow

From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore,

For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore:

Nameless here for evermore


Use the poem to answer these questions

Use the poem to answer these questions.

  • What type of structure does “The Raven” have?

    A. free form

    B. fixed form

    C. unrhymed

    D. lyric

    Hint: The repeated patterns and sounds of “The Raven help to define its structure.

2. What is the structure and pattern of “The Raven?”

A. Every line ends on the same rhyming word.

B. Themes are repeated in each stanza.

C. The sounds are repeated in a pattern.

D. It is unrhymed in a repeated pattern.

Hint: Repeat the poem out loud, softly to yourself, and hear the sounds that repeat.

Answer = B

Answer = C


More practice

More Practice

  • The poem on the next few slides is “The Story Hour” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

Between the dark and the daylight,

When the night is beginning to lower

Comes a pause in the day’s occupations,

That is known as the Children’s Hour.

1.

I hear in the chamber above me

The patter of little feet,

The sound of a door that is opened,

And voices soft and sweet.

5.

From my study I see in the lamplight,

Descending the broad hall stair,

Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra,

And Edith with golden hair.

9.


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

A whisper, and then a silence:

Yet I know by their merry eyes

They are plotting and planning together

To take me by surprise.

13.

A sudden rush from the stairway,

A sudden raid from the hall!

By three doors left unguarded

They enter my castle wall

17.

21.

They climb up into my turret

O’er the arms and back of my chair;

If I try to escape, they surround me;

They seem to be everywhere.


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

They almost devour me with kisses,

Their arms about me entwine,

Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen

In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!

25.

25.

Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti,

Because you have scaled the wall,

Such an old mustache as I am

Is not a match for you all!

26.

I have you fast in my fortress,

And will not let you depart,

But put you down into the dungeon

In the round-tower of my heart.

27.

And there will I keep you forever,

Yes, forever and a day,

Till the walls shall crumble to ruin,

And moulder in dust away!

28.


1 which lines are rhymed in each stanza

1. Which lines are rhymed in each stanza?

  • 1 and 3

  • 2 and 4

  • 1 and 4

  • 2 and 3

Answer = B


2 what universal theme does this poem advance

2. What universal theme does this poem advance?

  • Old age leaves parents weak.

  • Children are no match for their parent.

  • Children should not bother parents at work.

  • A parent loves his children.

Answer = D


3 how can you tell that this is not free form poetry

3. How can you tell that this is not free form poetry?

  • The lines and stanza have a pattern.

  • Words at the end of each line are unrhymed.

  • A single narrator tells the story of the poem.

  • It is concerned with a theme of love.

Answer = A


4 this poem tells a story which makes it a

4. This poem tells a story which makes it a…

  • fixed form

  • free form

  • lyric poem

  • narrative poem

Answer = D


5 what universal behavior forms the basis of this poem s theme

5. What universal behavior forms the basis of this poem’s theme?

  • Children love to test parents with play.

  • Children need to go to bed on time.

  • Children learn how to fight from their parents.

  • Parents need to be very strict with their children.

Answer =A


6 how do the stanzas best help to bring structure to this poem

6. How do the stanzas BEST help to bring structure to this poem?

  • They divide the poem into ten equal parts or sections.

  • They have identical length and patterns of rhyme.

  • They each contain a different rhythm that is repeated.

  • They use a free form that still rhymes certain words.

Answer = B


Sound devices

Sound Devices

Poetry contains a variety of devices that use sound. Although poetry is generally thought of today as a written form, it had its beginnings in songs and poetry spoken aloud. Therefore, the way the words of a poem sound together is often a major part of that poem’s effect.

Examples: alliteration, onomatopoeia,

rhyme scheme


Alliteration is a frorm of repetition the poet repeats certain sounds to create an effect

Alliteration is a frorm of repetition. The poet repeats certain sounds to create an effect.

  • Wee Willy Winky (beginning sound)

  • Sally Sells Sea Shells (beginning sound)

  • Itsy, bitsy, spider (other parts of the word besides beginning)

    NOW YOU THINK OF SOME…


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

Onomatopoeia is another device that creates sounds in the reader’s mind. The poet uses words that sound like what they describe: sizzle, crackle, zip, boom.

achoo

bang

beep

boo

boom

chatter

chirpding

eek

fizz

flick

flutter

thud

thump

tick-tock

tsk

tweet

ugh

vroom

whack

wham

whip

whisper

whizz

hiccup

hiss

honk

jangle

knock-knock

meow

moo

mumble

mutter

ouch

oink

ping

plop

pop

purr

quack

ratter

roar

rustle

rumble

shuffle

sizzle

slap

swoosh

whoosh

yikes

zap

zing

zip

zoom


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

Rhyme Scheme: This is a set pattern that determines which words in a poem will rhyme. Usually, this is the last word of certain lines of a stanza. Rarely do all the last words rhyme.

  • In the poem below, lines 1 (A) and 2 (A) rhyme. Lines 3 (B) and 6 (B) also rhyme creating a repeating pattern. This stanza’s rhyme scheme would be coded as AABCCB.

from… “The Highwayman”, by Alfred Noyes (an internal rhyme uses words that create a pattern within a stanza)

… The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, line 1 A

The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, line 2 A

The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor, line 3 B

And the highwayman came riding - - line 4 C

Riding – riding – line 5 C

The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door… line 6 B


Warm up unscramble the words to make a complete logical thought

You will be divided into groups. You group will be responsible for reading the poem on the next slide and writing down all the examples that you find of alliteration and onomatopoeia. You must also identify the rhyme scheme.


Jabberwocky by lewis carroll

Jabberwocky by: Lewis Carroll

(1) `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:All mimsy were the borogoves,  And the mome raths outgrabe.

(5 ) "Beware the Jabberwock, my son!  The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun  The frumious Bandersnatch!"

(9) He took his vorpal sword in hand:  Long time the manxome foe he sought --So rested he by the Tumtum tree,  And stood awhile in thought.

(13) And, as in uffish thought he stood,  The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,  And burbled as it came!

(17) One, two! One, two! And through and through  The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!He left it dead, and with its head  He went galumphing back.

(21) "And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?  Come to my arms, my beamish boy!O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'  He chortled in his joy. (25) `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves  Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;All mimsy were the borogoves,  And the mome raths outgrabe.


Standards1

Standards

  • 9RL1.P.a: The student identifies and responds to the aesthetic effects of subject matter (i.e., topic, theme), sound devices (i.e., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme), figurative language (i.e., personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole), and structure (i.e., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric) in a variety of poems.

  • 9RL1.P.b: The student sorts and classifies poems by specified criteria (i.e., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric, and/or universal themes and topics).


Exit slip

Exit Slip

  • In your own words explain the following:

    • Alliteration

    • Onomatopoeia

    • Rhyme Scheme


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