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Nothing is as Real World as Competition “School librarians’ roles with students and teachers in science fair competition” Mirah J. Dow, BSE, MLS, PhD Associate Professor School of Library and Information Management Emporia State University Emporia, KS USA [email protected]

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Nothing is as Real World as Competition

“School librarians’ roles with students and teachers in science fair competition”

Mirah J. Dow, BSE, MLS, PhD

Associate Professor

School of Library and Information Management

Emporia State University

Emporia, KS USA

[email protected]


Students tend to not ask librarians

for help. Don’t make this mistake!


Why read this
Why read this?

Purpose of Presentation

Doing a research project can be a challenge. You will need assistance from your school librarian (who has expertise in information seeking and technology use), science and math teachers, parents, an/or perhaps someone in your community who has specialized expertise. Each slide will help you to focus and help you to see what to do.


Competition

Motivation

Excellence

Creativity

Recognition

LOCAL REGIONAL STATE NATIONAL

MATH, APPLIED SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING




Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) & School Library Standards for the 21st Century Learner (AASL)

Your school librarian, science and math teachers can enable you to:

  • inquire, think critically and again knowledge;

  • draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations and create new knowledge;

  • share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society; and

  • pursue personal and aesthetic growth.

    Standards for the 21st Century Learner

    http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_LearningStandards.pdf

    STEM Education Coalition

    http://www.stemedcoalition.org/


Scientific method francesco redi 1626 1697
Scientific Method School Library Standards for the 21Francesco Redi, 1626-1697

Formulate a scientific question

Make observations

Research the question

Form a hypothesis

Design a study

Conduct an experiment

Analyze data

Draw conclusions

Communication results


Student stem educator school librarian two stages of research this is stage 1
Student ↔ STEM Educator ↔ School Librarian School Library Standards for the 21Two Stages of ResearchThis is stage #1.

Preparation Stage

Literature Context

Research

→ Topic → Observation → Question(s) → Hypothesis →


Student stem educator school librarian two stages of research this is stage 2
Student ↔ STEM Educator ↔ School Librarian School Library Standards for the 21Two Stages of ResearchThis is stage #2.

Experimental Stage

Data Context

Research

→ Design → Conduct → Analysis → Conclusions → Communication


Guided inquiry research process model
Guided Inquiry-Research Process Model School Library Standards for the 21

K – What do I Know? Literature review, research area, topic, context

W – What do I Want to know? Research Questions

F – How do I Find out? Method: What is the design of my study?

Who will I question?

What method will I use for data collection?

L- What did I Learn? Results: data and data analysis

U – How do I Use what I learned? Conclusions: Answer your research questions – What’s new? How does it apply to what is already known?

N – What will I do Next time? Conclusions

How can my study inform next research steps?

Guided Inquiry model from

Kuhlthau, C., Maniotes, L. K., and Caspari, A. K. (2007). Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st century. Libraries Unlimited.

Representation of the Research Process model from

Blaxter, L., Hughes, C., and Tight, M. (2006). How to research. Open University Press, pp. 8-9.


One page research proposal include these subheadings in your initial proposal
One Page Research Proposal School Library Standards for the 21(Include these subheadings in your initial proposal.)

Name, Grade, Today’s Date

Research Category

Title

Problem

Research Question

Permission Request Plans

Materials Needed

Procedure

Proposed Timeline


Tips for best results
Tips for Best Results School Library Standards for the 21

Ask your school librarian for assistance by partnering with you and your teachers.

Select a topic that matters and will address current needs of people in today’s society. Read and study about the topic so you really know it well.

Ask your school librarian and science teacher to hold an informational meeting. Invite the adults who will assist you.

Keep everything in your paper and/or electronic notebook; make good use of the electronic space (such as MyBackpack) provided at school. Complete assignments on time.

Give yourself plenty of time to collect significant data.

Learn the steps in the scientific process; know how this process can be applied to solving problems in everyday life.

Create a clear, concise poster; fully explain data and conclusions; compare your findings to findings in prior studies.

Write an excellent research paper. Use the required writing style, format and outline for contents.

Present your study to many different audiences; speak with confidence and conviction. Have fun.


References
References School Library Standards for the 21

Academic Success: How library services make a difference. ACRL Thirteenth National Conference. Pg 141 - 157.

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/national/baltimore/papers/141.pdf

American Association of School Librarians (2007). Standards for the 21st Century Learner.

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/standards.cfm

Blaxter, L., Hughes, C., and Tight, M. (2006). How to research. Open University Press, pp. 8-9.

Common Core State Standards Initiative

http://www.corestandards.org/

Dow, M. J. (2011). Broadcom MASTERS: School Librarians’ Roles in Middle School Science Fair Competition, School Library Monthly, to be published in November issue.

Kansas Science and Engineering Fair

http://kssciencefair.org/

Kansas Science and Technology Fair, State Standards

http://kssciencefair.org/resources/state-standards

Kuhlthau, C., Maniotes, L. K., and Caspari, A. K. (2007). Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st century. Libraries Unlimited.

Learning Skills for Information, Communication, and Media Literacy

http://kssciencefair.org/content/upload/files/ictmap_science.pdf

STEM Education Coalition

http://www.stemedcoalition.org/

Society for Science and the Public, Broadcom MASTERS Competition

http://www.societyforscience.org/MASTERS

What Students Don't Know. Inside Higher Ed. August 22, 2011:

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/22/erial_study_of_student_research_habits_at_illinois_university_libraries_reveals_alarmingly_poor_information_literacy_and_skills


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