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Matching. RLS 2005. C. The situation is often made worse by a predisposition to fill their homes with what some families referred to jokingly as “junk”. Ok, but we’re talking about 1 family, so why would homes be plural?.

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Matching

Matching

RLS 2005


Matching

C. The situation is often made worse by a predisposition to fill their homes with what some families referred to jokingly as “junk”.

Ok, but we’re talking about 1 family, so why would homes be plural?

E. Family members were attached to the things that filled their home and were not prepared to throw them away to create more room.

67 and E both explain why this family has accumulated so many possessions.

E=Correct

67. The reluctance to clear out their flat suggests that thisfamily’s attitude towards consumption outweighed their desire for space.


Matching

F. For example, parents of younger children managed better while older mothers did not have the same power over grown-up children’s possessions.

68 refers to one particular mother but F is speaking generally.

K. She did admit, however, that she waited until her offspring were out of the flat before she started clearing out their things.

K explains how she throws out her daughters’ clothes.

K=Correct

68. One younger mother felt she had to be ruthless when it came to throwing out her daughters’ clothes and toys in order to maintain control.


69 the obvious solution to the problem would be for residents to limit their consumption

M. This meant they had to be unsentimental about possessions like old school books and clothes.

Problem with tense

M is about throwing things out while 69 is about not buying things.

H. But do they actually perceive consumption as a problem in their high-density living environment or as an important part of their way of life?

The solution is not possible because residents don’t feel that their consumption is a problem.

H=Correct

69. The obvious solution to the problem would be for residents to limit their consumption.


Matching

B. Older people were also more likely to appreciate possessions associated with the past, or with relatives who have passed on.

B helps explain why residents of a certain age (older residents) kept so much.

F. For example, parents of younger children managed better while older mothers did not have the same power over their grown-up children’s possessions.

70 refers to the elderly while “F” refers to parents.

B = Correct

70. Some residents were of an age where (their need to keep so much) may relate to their quality and perceived usefulness.


71 possessions are stored according to their quality and perceived usefulness

G. Items put inside a wardrobe space, for example, are likely to be more highly valued than items placed under the bed.

G explains how people decide where to store things.

I. In one home, bulky clutter was placed near the front door, alongside a shoe rack, school bags, stacking stools and assorted boxes.

None of these storage spaces seem to indicate any priority.

G = Correct

71. Possessions are stored according to their quality and perceived usefulness.


Matching

G. Items put inside a wardrobe space, for example, are likely to be more highly valued than items placed under the bed.

72 does not refer to priority when storing things.

I. In one home, bulky clutter was placed near the front door, alongside a shoe rack, school bags, stacking stools and assorted boxes.

This is a list of places where people store large items.

I=Correct

72. In the absence of spacious rooms, attics, garages, cellars or built-in cupboards, a family has to find somewhere else to store large items.


Matching

C. The situation is often made worse by a predisposition to fill their homes with what some families referred to jokingly as “junk”.

Both 73 and C talk about how HK people in general like to collect things/junk.

E. Family members were attached to the things that filled their home and were not prepared to throw them away to create more room.

E seems to refer to the members of one particular family.

C=Correct

73. It is often said that Hong Kong people are great collectors and that they never throw things out. There is certainly some truth in this.


Matching

D. These were fitted under the beds, on top of cupboards, and were even placed on the beds during the day and on the floor at night.

D explains where people put these boxes.

L. Such re-organisation might mean that they simply do not feel “at home” there.

Both discuss the storage of things, but there’s no reason boxes would make people not feel at home.

D=Correct

74. When extra storage was required, the most convenient solution was to make use of plastic storage boxes.


Matching

L. Such re-organisation might mean that they simply do not feel “at home” there.

75 seems to refer to an ongoing effort to stay organised while L refers to a cluttered situation that needed to be re-organised.

M. This meant they had to be unsentimental about possessions like old school books and clothes.

This explains how they were able to keep their possessions to a minimum.

M=Correct

75. Several families we interviewed consciously made a point not to hoard things and tried to keep their possessions to a minimum.


Matching

A. The familymay decide to have a major clear-out, re-plan and re-think the overall space or buy a suitable piece of storage furniture.

76 refers to families that have varying degrees of success dealing with storage, while A refers to strategies that a disorganised family may choose to adopt.

F. For example, parents of younger children managed better while older mothers did not have the same power over grown-up children’s possessions.

F explains why the ability of families to cope varies.

F=Correct

76. The main problem stated by residents about living in such a limited space was storage. The ability to cope varied from family to family.


Matching

A. The family may decide to have a major clear-out, re-plan and re-think the overall space or buy a suitable piece of storage furniture.

“A” describes possible lasting solutions if the situation gets out of control.

C. The situation is often made worse by a predisposition to fill their homes with what some families referred to jokingly as “junk”.

“C” does not offer any solutions.

A = Correct

77. As things begin to pile up within the flat, the situation may get beyond control, and a more lasting solution might be sought.


Matching

A. The family may decide to have a major clear-out, re-plan and re-think the overall space or buy a suitable piece of storage furniture.

“A” only refers to one family and doesn’t make any reference to whether or not the people feel comfortable in their newly-organised flats.

L. Such re-organisation might mean that they simply do not feel “at home” there.

If they don’t change their attitude, they won’t feel at home in their newly-organised flat.

L=Correct

78. It would probably require a radical change in attitude before families could feel comfortable in a flat organised according to an impose, rational process.


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