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HURRICANE KATRINA FLOOD PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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HURRICANE KATRINA FLOOD. BY: JESSICA KANG. Formed over the Bahamas on August 23, 2005 Crossed southern Florida (category 1) Turned into category 3 on August 29, 2005 and caused severe damage along the Gulf Coast from central Florida to Texas

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HURRICANE KATRINA FLOOD

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HURRICANE KATRINA FLOOD

BY:

JESSICA KANG


  • Formed over the Bahamas on August 23, 2005

  • Crossed southern Florida (category 1)

  • Turned into category 3 on August 29, 2005 and caused severe damage along the Gulf Coast from central Florida to Texas

  • The most severe damage occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana

Facts


  • At least 1,836 lives were lost, making it one of the deadliest U. S. hurricanes

  • 705 are still missing

  • Costliest hurricane: $88.5 billion

More Facts


  • New Orleans is located on a delta formed by the Mississippi River

  • First settled by the French on the natural levee along the Mississippi bank (known today as the French Quarter)

  • North of the natural levee, the land slopes down into a swamp

History


  • Around 1900, large pumps were introduced to drain this wetland

    • Water was pumped up into canals and drained into Lake Pontchartrain

  • By 1950, houses and buildings made up the city that we know of today

History


  • Since New Orleans rests on a delta and it is being drained, the city is continuously sinking

  • This is because there is peat (unstable organic soil) found in the swamp

Geologic Setting


  • “Consolidation due to loss of water, when the peat loses volume in response to the loss of support offered by internal water pressure

  • Compaction under load, both self-loading and imposed by other sediments or built structures, when the highly porous peat restructures into a denser material

  • Wastage on exposure to air, when the peat simply oxidises and disappears where loss of water leaves it above the water table.”

Three Processes Behind Ground Subsidence on Peat


  • Knowing that the natural levees would not be enough to protect this sinking city, artificial levees were built.

  • But they weren’t enough to withstand Katrina. . .

Artificial Levees


  • Caused by under seepage through the levee silt

  • The silt washed out and formed “cavities” in the levees, which grew larger

  • Eventually, the levees collapsed

How the Levees Failed


  • To rebuild or not to rebuild. . . Ethical issues

    • Rebuild

      • Continue building higher levees as the city keeps sinking

      • Is it the right thing to do to rebuild in a hurricane prone area?

    • Not to Rebuild

      • Most people want to hear good news

        • In the short-run it may be good, but in the long-run?

      • Who is going to be responsible for the victims?

        • Many victims were thrown out of their trailer that was provided as shelter after the disaster

        • Government aid has also been cut off

Solutions: It’s Complicated!


  • Risk Management Solutions Inc. “Hurricane Katrina: Lessons of a Super Cat.” http:///www.rms.com. Web. 24 Feb. 2010.

  • Robertson, Ian N. "Lessons from Hurricane Katrina storm surge on bridges and buildings." Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering 133.6 (2007): 463-483. GeoRef. EBSCO. Web. 24 Feb. 2010.

  • Waltham, Tony. "The flooding of New Orleans." Geology Today 21.6 (2005): 225-231. GeoRef. EBSCO. Web. 24 Feb. 2010.

  • Hurricane Katrina. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Katrina

  • http://farm1.static.flickr.com/31/43339467_fbed13883f.jpg

  • http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english/history/katrina_2005_map.gif

  • http://lh3104.k12.sd.us/Event/katrina-new-orleans-flooding3-2005.jpg

  • http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/29/us/29trailer.html?_r=1

Works Cited


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