ENGL 6650/7650:
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 149

Cult Television PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 111 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

ENGL 6650/7650: Special Topics in Popular Culture Cult Television Spring 2011 Room: PH 308 Day/Time: Tuesday, 600-900 pm. Cult Television. 3/15/10 | Week 9

Download Presentation

Cult Television

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Cult television

ENGL 6650/7650:

Special Topics in Popular Culture

Cult Television

Spring 2011

Room: PH 308

Day/Time: Tuesday, 600-900 pm

Cult Television


Cult television

3/15/10 | Week 9

Cult TV Series of the Week: American Cult Comedy [Arrested Development, Big Bang Theory, The Comeback, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, Freaks and Geeks, The Larry Sanders Show, Mystery Science Theater 3000, Seinfeld, South Park, The Simpsons, Wonderfalls]

Required Reading: Beeler, ECTVR 322; Ford, ECTVR 77; Gray, ECTVR 120 & 221; Holtzclaw, ECTVR 181; Morreale, ECTVR 68

Recommended Reading: TBA

Special Topics/Readings: The Cult of Cult TV?—Fiddy (225)

Cult Television


Cult television

  • I Love Lucy

  • The Honeymooners

  • All in the Family

  • The Dick Van Dyke Show

  • The Mary Tyler Moore

  • Golden Girls

  • Roseanne

  • The Wonder Years

  • Leave It to Beaver

  • The Odd Couple

  • The Andy Griffith Show

  • The Bob Newhart Show

  • Bewitched

  • The Cosby Show

  • Family Ties

  • Taxi

  • Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman

  • Sanford and Son

  • The Jeffersons

  • The Cosby Show

Cult Television


Cult television

Everybody Loves Raymond

Friends

Cheers

Cult Television

Frasier


Cult television

TV Guide’s Fifty Greatest Shows of All Time

1. Seinfeld

2. I Love Lucy

3. The Honeymooners

4. All in the Family

8. The Simpsons

9. The Andy Griffith Show

11. The Mary Tyler Moore Show

13. The Dick Van Dyke Show

18. Cheers

21. Friends

25. M*A*S*H

28. The Cosby Show

34. Frasier

35. Roseanne

38. The Larry Sanders Show

44. The Bob Newhart Show

48. Taxi

50. Bewitched

18 out of 50--sitcoms

Cult Television


Cult television

Prehistory (So 20th Century)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

The Beverly Hillbillies (CBS, 1962-1971)

Cult Television


Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net

Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

Paul Henning (US, Green Acres (with Jay Sommers), Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Cast of Beverly Hillbillies

J.D. "Jed" Clampett (Buddy Ebsen)

Granny (Irene Ryan)

Elly May Clampett (Donna Douglas)

Jethro Bodine (Max Baer, Jr.)

Milburn Drysdale (Raymond Bailey)

Jane Hathaway (Nancy Kulp)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Freaks and Geeks (NBC, 1999-2000)

Cult Television


Cult television

Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

Judd Apatow (L) and Paul Feig (R) (US, Freaks and Geeks)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Green Acres (CBS, 1965-1971)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Cast of Green Acres

Oliver Wendell Douglas (Eddie Albert)

Lisa Douglas (Eva Gabor)

Mr. Eustace Haney (Pat Buttram)

Eb Dawson (Tom Lester)

Fred Ziffel (Hank Patterson)

Doris Ziffel (Barbara Pepper, 1965–1968)

Doris Ziffel (Fran Ryan, 1969–71)

Arnold Ziffel (Original pig came from the town of Union Star, Missouri)

Hank Kimball (Alvy Moore)

Sam Drucker (Frank Cady)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

The Larry Sanders Show (HBO, 1992-1998)

Cult Television


Cult television

Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

Garry Shandling (US, It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, The Larry Sanders Show)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Mystery Science Theater 3000 (KTMA, 1988-89; Comedy Central, 1989-91; Comedy Central, 1991-96; Sci-Fi Channel, 1997-1999)

Cult Television


Cult television

Mike Nelson

Gypsy

Crow T. Robot

Joel Robinson

Gypsy

Tom Servo

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Cult Television


Cult television

Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

Joshua Brand (pictured) and John Falsey (US, St. Elsewhere, Northern Exposure)


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

  • Deconstruction at Bat: Baseball vs. Critical Theory in Northern Exposure’s ‘The Graduate’

  • David Lavery

    • How can you hit and think at the same time?

    • Yogi Berra

    • I thought you were beyond authorial reference.

    • Professor Martin in ‘The Graduate’

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

  • In December 2004 an admired colleague and I crossed paths on campus. We had not seen each other in weeks, and as we caught up on personal and professional news, the subject turned to the then recently deceased Jacques Derrida. Everyone who knows me is aware, or so I thought, that I was not a fan. Had I not given a talk several years ago entitled ‘The French Disease: European Memes and the Infection of Western Thought’? Was I not fond of quoting (as I do again) David Lehman’s query in Sign of the Times: Deconstruction and the Fall of Paul De Man,

    • How to explain the cachet of deconstruction, the way it has infiltrated public discourse? At the crudest level of its appeal, the word announces the writer’s knowingness: I’m hip to what’s hip. I know what’s happening in the world of big ideas. A Los Angeles-based screenwriter named Mark Horowitz, trying to explain the current French enthusiasm for movies starring Mickey Rourke, places the deconstruction craze in the perspective of ‘a constant war between the U.S. and France.’ In Horowitz’s words, ‘We sent them Jerry Lewis, so they retaliated by sending us deconstruction and Jacques Derrida. . . . Deconstruction conforms to an American preconception of the cerebral French in the same way that Jerry Lewis in The Nutty Professor represents a Frenchman’s impression of an American type.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

So when my colleague proceeded to mourn the loss of the late ‘Boa Deconstructor’ as the passing of one of the great ‘public intellectuals’ of our time, I did, I will admit, almost lose it. ‘Public’ intellectual? How could such a world class promulgator of the indecipherable be deemed a ‘public’ intellectual? Horns locked, both of us a bit shocked at the animosity we had conjured, we backed away and changed the subject.

No doubt you are wondering what all this has to do with Northern Exposure. I began here because I wanted you to know, up front, that I have a dog in this fight— and by fight I mean a sixth season episode of Northern Exposure entitled ‘The Graduate.’

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Northern Exposure (1900-1995) was always a supremely literary television series. In the Season Three episode ‘Cicely’ (3:23), for example, we learn that Franz Kafka once visited the small Alaskan town, where he was first inspired to write ‘Metamorphosis.’ In Season Five’s ‘Una Volta in L'Inverno’ (5:17), septuagenarian store owner Ruth Anne Miller sets out to learn Italian so she can read Dante’s Divine Comedy in the original. Season Six’s ‘Up River’ (6:8) evokes Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (not to mention its cinematic reimagining in Apocalypse Now), with Ed Chigliak playing Harry Marlow/Benjamin Willard and Joel Fleischman as Kurtz. And from first episode to last, morning DJ Chris Stevens’ radio monologues are full of references to great writers and thinkers. As Robert J. Thompson has observed,

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

  • Sometimes Northern Exposure wasn't just like reading a good book, it actually presented people reading good books. Throughout one entire episode [Season Two’s ‘War and Peace’], for example . . . Chris Stevens . . . reads passages from War and Peace. In the meantime, according to the producers' plot synopsis, the residents of Cicely ‘experience Tolstoyesque nightmares and Dostoyevskian passions.’ Chris, an intellectual dilettante who seemed to be taking all of his on air rambling patter from a college syllabus, went a long way in giving the show its cerebral if somewhat self-important veneer. At one time or another during the course of the series, Chris made references to works by Hegel, Kierkegaard, Kant, Nietzsche, de Tocqueville, Jefferson, Whitman, Baudelaire, Melville, Shakespeare, Jung, Jack London, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and many other authors. No nerd, Chris was just as fluent with Raymond Chandler or Def Leppard, but it was his perpetual name-dropping and passage citing from the Great Books that seemed to announce, as [John] Falsey and [Joshua] Brand [the series’ creators] had often boasted, that Northern Exposure wasn't written for the ‘mass audience.’

Chris Stevens

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

No single installment of Northern Exposureseemed less directed to a mass audience than ‘The Graduate,’ written by Sam Egan and directed by James Hayman, an episode, very near the end of the series’ run, concerned with Chris’ defense of his thesis, in partial fulfilment of an M.A. in a University of Alaska extension program. Indeed, the intended audience for ‘The Graduate’ would seem to be not someone with a Nielsen box but the faculty of an English department. Chris has, it seems, penned a deconstructionist/post-colonial reading of the Ernest Lawrence Thayer classic ‘Casey at the Bat’ and finds himself forced to navigate the Scylla and Charybdis of his openly adversarial committee members. Professor Dick Schuster, a traditional literary scholar who (in his own words) wants to treat ‘a poem as a poem and not just a code,’ dislikes reading presentist political implications into a poem from 1888, and refuses to grant a ‘diploma for glibness, nor even erudition.’ Prof. Aaron Martin, on the other hand, an advocate for ‘interpretive freedom’ and ‘hermeneutic license,’ is a young Turk, impressed by the candidate’s outlaw status (a high school drop-out, Chris had once done hard time back in West Virginia) and predisposed to the thesis’ understanding of the big guy at the plate as a combination Nietzschean übbermensch and emblem of American manifest destiny. As Chris’ orals begin, we get a taste of the opposing forces.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

At the outset, Professor Schuster reminds Chris that ‘brevity is the soul of wit,’ and Martin counters his senior colleague’s quotation of Alexander Pope by evoking Dorothy Parker’s ‘Brevity is the soul of lingerie.’ In response to Schuster’s question, Chris successfully defines ‘objective correlative,’ identifies T. S. Eliot as the source of the term, and recites William Carlos Williams’ ‘Red Wheelbarrow’ as an example. Then Martin asks a question that would seem like a parody if it weren’t frighteningly representative: ‘In what way does the relativism embodied in Melville’s duality of evil presage the moral ambiguities of twentieth century colonialism?’ ‘Heaven help us,’ Schuster groans, but Chris answers in the spirit of the question, proclaiming radical notions about the ‘whole paradox of colonialism, the benevolent imperialist, the hubris of the first world, the marine corporal with a Zippo in Nam who had to burn down the village in order to save it.’

Though I cannot be absolutely certain, I would venture to say that this may have been the first, and perhaps the only, time ‘objective correlative’ was ever discussed in prime-time. It may also have been the network television debut of the word ‘presage.’ At this point, however, tensions are only simmering. No one is taking Chris to task for his mangled metaphors—how precisely does one bring a ‘great white whale to its knees’?—or his ideas. Prof. Martin is pleased, deeming Chris’ rant ‘right on,’ and Professor Schuster bites his tongue, not yet ready to go to war.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

When Schuster scolds Martin that ‘You and your carjacking protégé . . .have put 2000 years of accumulated knowledge into a rhetorical Osterizer and grinded it all into oblivion.’ he characterizes Schuster’s old- fashioned mindset as ‘bigotry with panache.’ As Chris looks on in wonder, they go for each other’s throats but are separated by the powerful Minnifield (on the right), who angrily (and hilariously) reminds them ‘Gentleman, it’s only literature.’

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Northern Exposure was, of course, an ensemble dramedy, and ‘The Graduate,’ like every episode, explores multiple story lines, one of which serves to counterpoint Chris’ thesis defense. Maggie O’Connell outbids Maurice and becomes owner and proprietor of the town’s only movie theatre and immediately hires Cicely’s cinephile Ed Chigliak as ‘in house film consultant.’ Drooling over movie catalogs, captivated by the prospect of screening Diabolique, Last Year at Marienbad, The Italian Straw Hat, Mr. Hulot’s Holiday, Blue Angel, and Eyes without a Face, but clueless about the actual movie tastes of his fellow citizens, Ed’s programming choices prove unpopular, and Maggie must finally put her foot down, overruling Ed’s taste for ‘obscure classics and cult films.’ Dumb and Dumber is ordered, and in the final movie theatre scene Forrest Gump is packing them in.

In the episode’s titular story line, something quite similar transpires as Chris Stevens abandons his elitist deconstructionist inclinations—Denis Donoghue, after all, once described deconstruction as a sad attempt by the academy to develop its own avant-garde—in favour of more traditional critical assumptions. His conversion begins at a dinner party, hosted by the always pompous plutocrat Maurice Minnifield, at which the culture war erupts and Chris’ committee members come to blows.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

After Martin and Schuster hit up Maurice for endowing a chair (clearly an ongoing discussion), talk turns to Derrida and Barthes, and the death of the author (a moment in literary history praised by Martin as a releaser of all the hidden meanings buried in a text), and Chris expresses for the first time misgivings about his poststructuralist way of approaching literature, wondering what happens to ‘beauty is truth, truth beauty’ (Keats—from ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’) under such an episteme. Banter between Martin and Schuster becomes increasingly confrontational, and this time it’s personal. To the former’s accusation that his senior colleague clings to old ideas in order to remain department chair, Schuster responds with sarcastic glee ‘You better get used to those faculty apartments.’ . . .

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Earlier Chris had offered a toast to academia: ‘in a world of ever more compromise and pettiness, the last refuge for ideas and idealism for their own sake.’ At Maurice’s Chris begins to realize his naiveté and sees for the first time that the hostility critical theory has spawned may be a sublimation of such non-intellectual petty matters as who holds the department chair, or secures the office with a window, or gets the best housing. As the cliché we all know has it, the competition is so fierce because the rewards are so small.

Not surprisingly, bearing witness to such a spectacle, even if it’s only about literature, causes Chris to have bad dreams.He finds himself in a war zone, leading a platoon that include soldiers named Beethoven, Van Gogh, a ‘Nevermore’ uttering Poe, and Shakespeare, under fire from a sniper. The radio brings news that the sniper has taken out the entire ‘Transcendental 45th,’ including Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller. A too-brave Shakespeare, distraught over the death of Poe, is himself gunned down and dies uttering the famous last words ‘It is a far, far more better thing I do.’ An angry Chris goes after the sniper, only to come face-to-face with himself.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Television doesn’t get any better, or any more literary, than this. Shakespeare, of course, gets all the best lines—his ‘They got Eddie!’ lament upon the death of Poe, his anachronistically fatal quotation of Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. But it is Chris who comes away terrified but enlightened by his dream-shattering ouroboric recognition that the canon-terminating sniper—and take note how well the metaphor works—is really himself. The next day, ‘Chris in the Morning’ is all about his doubts. As Ray Charles wails the appropriately titled ‘Tell me What I Say’ in the background, Chris acquaints all of Cicely (and the television audience as well) with his growing methodological concerns. ‘You analyse something too much you just grind it into dust,’ he has come to think, wondering if his whole pursuit of a degree may have been a misguided venture: ‘I should never have opened that matchbook. ‘We are looking for people who like to think.’’ But such musings are, in fact, rhetorical, for Chris has concocted a new plan for his thesis defense.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Anyone who has been around universities for a time has probably heard Academic Legends about theses and dissertation defences—the one making the rounds when I was working on my M.A., for example, about the doctoral candidate at the University of Minnesota who lost his lunch all over the conference table. Thesis and dissertations have even found their way into films. In Irvin Kershner’s The Eyes of Laura Mars (1978), for example, released the year I finished my own dissertation, a serial killer is revealed to be a detective (played by Tommy Lee Jones) driven to psychopathy by his inability to even finish his treatise. Earlier in the decade, in Richard Rush’s forgotten semi-classic Getting Straight (1970), Elliott Gould plays a deeply confused graduate student named Harry Bailey who inadvertently brings to his thesis defense at Berkeley a hollowed-out book filled with pot and then, as riots erupt outside and his committee becomes embroiled in a debate over Leslie Fiedler-esque ideas about the homoerotic subtext of The Great Gatsby, goes nuts. After insisting that the major verse form in English is, in fact, the limerick (and reciting a particularly profane one), Bailey jumps up on the conference table and brings the defense to an end by planting a sloppy kiss on the lips of his committee chair.

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Getting Straight is clearly one of ‘The Graduate’s’ ancestor texts. Airing as it did in March 1995, it is not, however, ‘come back to the raft, Huck, honey’ ideas that are its antagonist but deconstruction and poststructuralism, and Chris Stevens is no Harry Bailey. For there is method in his madness. As Professors Martin and Stevens await the candidate’s arrival, about to declare him a no-show, they are summoned to a snow-covered baseball diamond for a field test, if you will, of his new, much less esoteric, understanding of ‘Casey.’

‘What’s the meaning of this?’ Schuster asks, appropriately enough, as they arrive at Minnifield Field, and Chris, punning, replies that he wants to ‘take another swing’ at Thayer’s meaning. To Martin’s surprised rejoinder, ‘I thought you were beyond authorial reference,’ Chris asks him to take a bat and go to the plate. As Chris recites the poem from memory, Martin goes down on strikes three snow-covered pitches later, the last two whiffs, just like the Mighty Casey. Striding toward his vanquished examiner, Chris intones Thayer’s final lines:

Cult Television


Cult television

American Cult Comedy

Northern Exposure (ABC, 1990-1995)

Cult Television

  • Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright,

  • The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light;

  • And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout,

  • But there is no joy in Mudville—mighty Casey has struck out.

  • Pointing to Martin’s stomach, he explains ‘That’s what Casey at the bat is about—that feeling in your gut.’

  • ‘I thought you were beyond authorial reference,’ It’s one of those meta-media moments that make a proselytiser for television, especially what I have been calling of late ‘television creativity,’ squirm with joy on my couch potato couch. Mirroring in its development its antecedent media literature and the movies, both slow to discover the author/auteur and then surprisingly anxious to finish him off, television, you see, is supposed to be made in anonymity. Only now, as we speak, are TV auteurs emerging. Only now are we beginning to recognize the creative human beings who make television, a medium, nearly everyone agrees, supremely friendly to the writers who produce such brilliant fare as ‘The Graduate’ while toiling largely in obscurity. I know next-to-nothing about Sam Egan, its author, which doesn’t seem quite fair, since he seems know a lot about me—about us. But I do know this: like me he believes that deconstruction has had its turn at bat, its innings even, and has now struck out.


  • Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Pee-Wee’s Playhouse (CBS, 1986-1990)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Ren and Stimpy (Nicelodeon, 1991-1996)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show (ABC, 1959-61; NBC, 1961-64)

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net1

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Jay Ward (US, Rocky and Bullwinkle, George of the Jungle)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show (ABC, 1959-61; NBC, 1961-64)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show (ABC, 1959-61; NBC, 1961-64)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show (ABC, 1959-61; NBC, 1961-64)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show (ABC, 1959-61; NBC, 1961-64)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Saturday Night Live (NBC, 1975- )

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net2

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Lorne Michaels (US, Saturday Night Live)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Seinfeld (NBC, 1989-1998)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Seinfeld and the Sitcom

    • Originally rejected by NBC chief Brandon Tartikoff as “too New York, too Jewish”

    • A show about nothing

    • Sought to always override normal sitcom conventions

    • Governed by the motto: “no hugging, no learning”

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “Seinfeld is the rarest commodity in the entertainment business—a sure thing. The show’s strategic importance to NBC reaches far beyond just the network’s profit on the show. NBC has leveraged Seinfeld and its prime-time strength in such a way as to put considerable distance between it and other broadcast and cable networks. Indeed, by delivering the key demographics advertisers seek, NBC last year was nearly seven times as profitable as ABC, the only other network to make money in 1996. . . .”

    Elizabeth Lesly, with Ronald Grover and I. Jeanne Dugan. “Seinfeld: The Economics of a TV Supershow and What It Means for NBC and the Industry.” Business Week, issue 2, June 1997: 116 –22.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “It is the first TV series to command more than $1 million a minute for advertising—a mark previously attained only by the Super Bowl. Its growing strength has helped a smart network dominate prime time—and news, mornings, and late nights, too. It has shattered the ceiling of what a network will pay to keep a show and even its supporting actors. It effortlessly creates cultural artifacts and major tourist attractions out of the quotidian things of its characters. It has so permeated popular consciousness that the august New York Times op-ed page warned recently that the show was contributing to the coarsening of American life. It will cost NBC about $120 million to bring it back for its ninth season. That’s more than 10 percent of NBC’s entire prime-time budget for 26 shows. But it probably is worth every penny, even before you start counting the $180 million or so the network will get from advertising alone. . . .”

    Elizabeth Lesly, with Ronald Grover and I. Jeanne Dugan. “Seinfeld: The Economics of a TV Supershow and What It Means for NBC and the Industry.” Business Week, issue 2, June 1997: 116 –22.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “All the while, NBC has been busily using Seinfeld-generated lucre to diversify into cable networks and international markets and to snare the long-term rights to hugely expensive future events such as the Olympic Games. ‘It almost defies logic what the value of that program is’ to NBC, says top media buyer Betsy Frank of Zenith Media Services, who buys ad time for such clients as General Motors and Toyota’s Lexus. ‘Seinfeld is one of the most important shows in history.’

    Elizabeth Lesly, with Ronald Grover and I. Jeanne Dugan. “Seinfeld: The Economics of a TV Supershow and What It Means for NBC and the Industry.” Business Week, issue 2, June 1997: 116 –22.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Memorable Seinfeld Episodes (I)

    • “The Chinese Retaurant” (2.11): J, E, & G wait in line for a table.

    • “The Parking Garage” (3.21): J, E, G, & K try to find their car in a mall parking garage.

    • “The Contest” (4.10): The Fab Four make a bet to see who can last the longest without masturbating.

    • “The Outing” (4.16): Jerry and George are mistaken for a gay couple.

    • “The Marine Biologist” (5.14): While Elaine deals with a gruff Russian writer, George must pretend to be a marine biologist.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Memorable Seinfeld Episodes (II)

    • “The Soup Nazi” (7.6): The Fab Four become obsessed with the fabulous soup of a very irascible cook.

    • “The Bizzaro Jerry” (8.3): Elaine meets the exact opposites of J, K, and G.

    • “The Betrayal” (9.8): An episode told backward.

    • “The Finale” (9.21-22): J, E, G, & K go on trial, charged with violation of a good samaritan law.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Some Seinfeldian Terms

    • Anti-Dentite

    • Baldist

    • Bizarro

    • BBO

    • Bombable

    • Break-up by Association

    • Bro/Mansierre

    • Bump Into

    • Call Waiting Face-Off

    • Cell-Phone Walk & Talk

    • Changing Teams

    • Close Talker

    • Consolation Guy

    • Dating Decathlon

    • Degifting

    • Double Dipper

    • Excuse Rolodex

    • Festivus

    • Hand

    • High Talker

    • Home Bed Advantage

    • “Hoochie Mama”

    • I love you Return

    • “It’s Not You, It’s Me”

    • Kiss Hello

    • Long Talker

    • Low Talker

    • Make-Up Sex

    • Master of My Domain

    • Mimbo

    • Nonvite

    • Pop-In

    • Regifting

    • Sentence Finisher

    • “Serenity Now”

    • Schmoopy

    • Shiksappeal

    • Shrinkage Factor

    • Shusher/Shushee

    • Spongeworthy

    • Spare a Square

    • Tap, The

    • Undateable

    • Unshushables

    • Unvitation

    • Yada, Yada, Yada

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    • Boutros-Ghali, Boutros

    • Breakfast at Tiffany’s

    • Brezhnev, Alexander

    • Brown, Helen Gurley

    • Bruce, Lenny

    • Bullock, Sandra

    • Caligula

    • Cape Fear

    • Capote, Truman

    • Captain and Tenille

    • Carlyle, Thomas

    • Ceausescu, Nikolai

    • Chamberlin, Neville

    • Chapter Two

    • Cheever, John

    • Confucius

    • Coniff, Ray

    • Cotton, Joseph

    • Croft, Steve

    • Cry in the Dark, A

    • Crying Game, The

    • C-Span

    • Danson, Ted

    • De Gaulle, Charles

    • Desperado

    • Docker’s

    • Edward Scissorhands

    • Elephant Man, The

    • Endora

    • English Patient, The

    • Fatal Vision

    • Few Good Men, A

    • Fiddler on the Roof

    • Fossey, Diane

    • Fudd, Elmer

    • Gandhi

    • Ghostbusters

    • Godzilla

    • Great Gatsby, The

    • Green Lantern

    • Greenpeace

    • Grodin, Charles

    • 9 ½ Weeks

    • 90210

    • Alien Autopsy

    • Alive

    • All My Children

    • Anderson, Loni

    • Anthony, Susan B.

    • Anti-Christ

    • Apocalypse Now

    • Aquaman

    • Archie

    • Barton, Clara

    • Basic Instinct

    • Batman

    • Beaches

    • Bermuda Triangle

    • Bernsen, Corbin

    • Blob, The

    • Boggle

    • Bold and the Beautiful

    • Book Despository

    • Bosco

    Seinfeld Intertexts and Allusions (A Partial List)


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    • Gumbel, Bryant

    • Guys and Dolls

    • Hackett, Buddy

    • Hart, Mary

    • Hazel

    • Hezbolla

    • Ho, Don

    • Hoffman, Dustin

    • Holocaust

    • Horne, Lena

    • Housman, John

    • Hubbard, L. Ron

    • Hulk, The Incredible

    • Hussein, Saddam

    • James, Rick

    • Jennings, Peter

    • JKF

    • Johnson, Lyndon Baines

    • Jorel

    • Kennedy, John F., Jr.

    • JFK

    • Kevorkian, Dr.

    • Kix

    • Kool Aid

    • Koop, C. Everett

    • Kowalski, Stanley

    • Last Tango in Paris

    • Lee, Spike

    • Leonard, Sugar Ray

    • Lord of the Flies

    • Loren, Sophia

    • Lorre, Peter

    • Machado, The

    • Mad About You

    • Mansfield, Jayne

    • Mattingly, Don

    • McArthur Park

    • McPherson, Elle

    • Meir, Golda

    • Melrose Place

    • Mendes, Sergio

    • Merv Griffin Show

    • Meyer, Russ

    • Middler, Bette

    • Midnight Cowboy

    • minimalism

    • Moby-Dick

    • Monet, Claud

    • Murphy Brown

    • Murrow, Edward R.

    • Naked Gun

    • Nedda

    • Neeson, Liam

    • Nelson, Ozzie

    • Net, The

    • New Yorker

    • Nick at Nite

    • Nightingale, Florence

    • O’Neil, Paul

    • Oswald, Lee Harvey

    Seinfeld Intertexts and Allusions (A Partial List)


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    • Outlaw Josey Wales

    • Pacino, Al

    • Pagliacci

    • Pandora’s Box

    • Paper Chase

    • Parks, Rosa

    • Patty Duke Show

    • Penthouse

    • Penthouse

    • Peter Pan

    • Pinter, Harold

    • Plan 9 from Outer Space

    • Planet of the Apes, The

    • Ponce de Leon: The Movie

    • Pottery Barn

    • Private Life of Henry VIII, The

    • Punky Brewster

    • Regis and Kathy Lee

    • Rivera, Chita

    • Rivera, Geraldo

    • Roker, Al

    • Runaway Train

    • Rushdie, Salman

    • Safire, William

    • Savage, Fred

    • Scent of a Woman

    • Schindler’s List

    • Scientology

    • Seals and Croft

    • Seles, Monica

    • Selma

    • Shaft

    • Showalter, Buck

    • Simon, Neil

    • Skinheads

    • Spartacus

    • Spider Man

    • Stalin, Joseph

    • Star Trek

    • Star Wars

    • Steel Cage Death Match

    • Stella

    • Streep, Meryl

    • Sunset Boulevard

    • Superman

    • Svengali Thomas, Clarence

    • Three Stooges

    • Three Tenors, The

    • Today Show

    • Tolstoy, Leo

    • Tonight Show

    • Torme, Mel

    • Tropic of Cancer

    • Tropic of Capricorn

    • Tupperware

    • TV Guide

    • Tweetie Bird

    Seinfeld Intertexts and Allusions (A Partial List)


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    • Twilight Zone, The

    • Two-Face

    • Utopian

    • Vale, Jerry

    • Voight, Jon

    • War and Peace

    • War, What is it good for

    • Wendt, George

    • Will, George

    • Winnie the Pooh

    • Witchy Woman

    • Woodpecker, Woody

    • Yo Yo Ma

    • Ziggy

    Seinfeld Intertexts and Allusions (A Partial List)


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    Seinfeld and Male Bonding

    Joanna L. Di Mattia. “Male Anxiety and the Buddy System in Seinfeld” in Lavery and Dunne, Master of Its Domain.

    Katherine Gantz. ”’Not That There's Anything Wrong with That’: Reading the Queer in Seinfeld.” In Calvin Thomas (Ed.). Straight with a Twist: Queer Theory and the Subject of Heterosexuality. Champaign. Illinois: U of Illinois P.


    Cult television

    “The schlemiel is the active disseminator of bad luck, and the schlimazel its passive victim . . . . [T]he schlimazel happens upon mischance, he has a penchant for lucklessness . . . . The schlemiel’s misfortune is his character. It is not accidental, but essential. Whereas comedy involving the schlimazel tends to be situational, the schlemiel's comedy is existential, deriving from his very nature in its confrontation with reality. . . . As the schlemiel's world centers around his essential lucklessness, the schlimazel’s world centers around situations, the mundane, everyday pains and pleasures of life.”

    Carla Johnson, “Lost in New York: The Schlemiel and the Schlimazel in Seinfeld”

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Jon Stratton, “Seinfeld is a Jewish Sitcom, Is’t It?: Ethnicity and Assimilation on 1990s American Television” in Lavery and Dunne, ed., Master of Its Domain.

    Kramer: “Wacky neighbor” or “Yiddisher”

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    The infamous Seinfeld finale was, of course, written by Larry David, who returned for the finale after having left the show at the end of Season Seven.

    For more on Seinfeld’s last episode, see Joanne Morreale, “Sitcoms Say Goodbye: The Cultural Spectacle of Seinfeld’s Last Episode,” in Critiquing the Sitcom: A Reader, The Television Series, ed. Joanne Morreale (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2003), 274-85 and Albert Auster, “Much Ado About Nothing: Some Final Thoughts on Seinfeld, in Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain: Revisiting TVs Greatest Sitcom, ed. David Lavery (New York: Continuum, 2006), 13-22.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    The Creators: Larry David, Jerry Seinfeld


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Kramer, Elaine, George, Jerry

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Kramer, George, Elaine, and Jerry

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    George, Jerry, Kramer, Elaine

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Jerry Seinfeld (Jerry Seinfeld)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    Jerry Seinfeld


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    George Costanza


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    George Costanza (Jason Alexander)


    Cult television

    Elaine Benes

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Elaines Benes

    (Julia Louis-Dreyfus)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cosmo Kramer

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cosmo Kramer (“Hipster Doofus”)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Unforgettable Minor Characters

    Cult Television

    The Soup Nazi


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    Unforgettable Minor Characters

    • Kenny Bania

    • Babu Bhatt

    • Lt. Bookman

    • The Bubble Boy

    • Jackie Chiles

    • Estelle Costanza

    • Frank Costanza

    • Crazy Joe Davola

    • Jack Klompus

    • The Maestro

    • Sue Ellen Mischke

    • Newman

    • J. Peterman

    • Mr. Pitt

    • Poppi

    • David Putty

    • The Soup Nazi

    • Stan the Caddy

    • Uncle Leo

    • Dr. Tim Whatley


    Cult television

    Some Seinfeldisms

    Cult Television

    • Anti-Dentite

    • Baldist

    • Bizarro

    • BBO

    • Bombable

    • Break-up by Association

    • Bro

    • Bump Into

    • Call Waiting Face-Off

    • Cell-Phone Walk and Talk

    • Changing Teams

    • Close Talker

    • Consolation Guy

    • Dating Decathlon

    • Degifting

    • Double Dipper


    Cult television

    Some Seinfeldisms

    Cult Television

    • Excuse Rolodex

    • Festivus

    • Hand

    • High Talker

    • Home Bed Advantage

    • “Hoochie Mama:”

    • I love you Return

    • “It’s Not You, It’s Me”

    • Kiss Hello

    • Long Talker

    • Low Talker

    • Make-Up Sex

    • Mansierre

    • Master of My Domain

    • Mimbo


    Cult television

    Some Seinfeldisms

    Cult Television

    • Nonvite

    • Pop-In

    • Regifting

    • Sentence Finisher

    • “Serenity Now”

    • Schmoopy

    • Shiksappeal

    • Shrinkage Factor

    • Shusher/Shushee

    • Spongeworthy

    • Spare a Square

    • Tap, The

    • Undateable

    • Unshushables

    • Unvitation

    • Yada, Yada, Yada

    • “You’re so Good Looking”


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    B.O.: abbr., Body Odor. As a compound word, B.O. refers to the unpleasant odor emitted by a human body. The components can be referred to as separate entities, however - as the Body and the Odor, thus allowing for examination of the odor outside of its bodily context, for example: “when somebody has B.O., the "O" usually stays with the "B". Once the "B" leaves, the "O" goes with it.” (The Smelly Car)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Break-up by Association: the assumed dissociation of mutual friends brought forth by the end of a romantic relationship. Thus, if lover A initiates a break-up with lover B, the friends of lover A are automatically subject to a break-up of their friendship with lover B. (The Deal)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Bro: An undergarment designed to support the weight of adipose tissue in the male breast, a symptom of obesity or gerontological processes. Also known as Mansierre. (The Doorman)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Double Dipper: An inconsiderate slob. An incogitant unsanitarian. One who contaminates a shared supply of chip-dip, via the following process: (1) the chip is dipped into the chip-dip. (2) the dipped portion of the chip is consumed; (3) the remaining portion is, possibly, polluted by the saliva and other oral slimes of the chip-dipper; (4) The now-contaminated portion of the chip is then redipped, causing a transference of contaminants into the chip-dip. (The Implant)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    “It’s Not You, It’s Me” Routine: A generic script for ending a romantic relationship, which is intended to be as minimally offensive as possible. (The Lip Reader)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Shrinkage Factor: The phenomenon by which the size of the male genitalia decreases upon prolonged exposure to cold water. An inaccurate appraisal of the affected organ results, when the observer is a female who is unaware of the shrinkage factor. (The Hamptons)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Spongeworthy: A male of a sexual caliber that merits the use of a contraceptive device (sponge), that is of a rare and limited supply. (The Sponge)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    A Seinfeldism (by Betty Lee, from Seinfeld, Master of Its Domain)

    Yada, Yada, Yada: equivalent to, “and so on,” “etc., etc.,” “blah, blah, blah,” but used in a molested context, in which the abbreviated meaning cannot be clearly implied. For example: “I apologize for being late. I was in an accident, almost died, yada, yada, yada.” The listener is left, usually, with a sense of confusion, curiosity, and dissatisfaction. (The Yada Yada)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    “No Exit”: The Seinfeld Finale


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    David Lavery and Sara Lewis Dunne (Middle Tennessee State University), Preface. “Part of Popular Culture”: The Legacy of Seinfeld

    “Giddy-Up!”: Introductions

    Albert Auster (Fordham University), Much Ado About Nothing: Some Final Thoughts on Seinfeld

    David Marc (Syracuse University), Seinfeld: A Show (Almost) About Nothing

    Bill Wyman, Seinfeld

    Reflections on Seinfeld

    “Maybe the dingoes ate your baby”: Genre, Humor, Intertextuality

    Michael Dunne (Middle Tennessee State University), Seinfeld as Intertextual Comedy 

    Barbara Ching (University of Memphis), They Laughed Unhappily Ever After: Seinfeld, Situation Comedy, and the Encounter with Nothingness 

    Dennis Hall (University of Louisville), Jane Austen, Meet Jerry Seinfeld 

    Amy McWilliams (Texas A & M), Genre Expectation and Narrative Innovation in Seinfeld

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “If I like their race, how can that be racist?”: Gender, Generations, and Ethnicity

    Joanna L. Di Mattia (Monash University), Male Anxiety and the Buddy System in Seinfeld

    Matthew Bond, “Are they having babies just so people will visit them?”: Parents and Children on Seinfeld

    Jon Stratton (Curtin University of Technology), Seinfeldis a Jewish Sitcom, Isn’t It: Ethnicity and Assimilation on 1990s American Television

    “It is so sad, all your knowledge of high culture comes from Bugs Bunny cartoons”: Cultural, Pop Cultural, and Media Matters

    Geoffrey O’Brien, The Republic of Seinfeld

    Sara Lewis Dunne (Middle Tennessee State University), Seinfood: Purity, Danger, and Food Codes on Seinfeld

    Eleanor Hersey (Fresno Pacific University), "It’ll Always Be Burma to Me": J. Peterman on Seinfeld

    Elke van Cassel (Radboud University Nijmegen), Getting the Joke: Seinfeldfrom a European Perspective

    Michael M. Epstein (Southwestern University School of Law), Mark C. Rogers (Walsh University), and Jimmie L. Reeves (Texas Tech University), From Must-See-TV to Branded Counter Programming: Seinfeld and Syndication

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Afterword

    David Lavery, Middle Tennessee State University, with Marc Leverette, Colorado State University, Re-Reading Seinfeld after Curb Your Enthusiasm

    “Get Out!”: Back Pages

    Betty Lee, Seinfeld Lexicon

    Seinfeld Episode and Situation Guide (by David Lavery)

    Seinfeld Intertexts and Allusions

    Contributors

    Bibliography

    Index

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “But I don’t want to be a pirate!”: The Puffy Shirt

    Seinfeld Afterlife

    The Puffy Shirt in the Smithsonian


    Cult television

    The Fab Four reunited in Season Seven of Curb Your Enthusiasm.

    Seinfeld Afterlife

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Simpsons (FOX, 1989- )

    How The Simpsons is

    really made.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    21st Century American Cult TV Comedy

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Adult Swim (Cartoon Network, 2001- )

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Arrested Development (FOX, 2003-2006)

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net3

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Mitchell Hurwitz (US, Arrested Development, The Bridget Show)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Big Bang Theory (CBS, 2007- )

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net4

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Chuck Lorre (US, Two and a Half Men, Big Bang Theory)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Californication (Showtime, 2007- )

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Tom Kapinos (US, Californication)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Comeback (HBO, 2005)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Michael Patrick King (US, Sex and the City, The Comeback)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Curb Your Enthusiasm (HBO, 2000- )

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Larry David(as himself)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cheryl David(Cheryl Hines)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Jeff Greene(Jeff Garlin)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Susie Greene(Susie Essman)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Richard Lewis(As Himself)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “We’ll go to ABC. I don’t have to be at HBO. ‘It’s not TV?’ It’s TV. What do they think people are watching? You watch it on TV don’t you? You don’t go to the movies to watch it.”

    Larry David in “The Shrimp Incident” (Curb Your Enthusiasm 2.4)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • How Curb is Done:

    • Many real people appears as themselves: Richard Lewis, Wanda Sykes, Ted Danson, Alanis Morisette, Ben Stiller, David Schwimmer, Jason Alexander, Julia-Louis Dreyfus.

    • Some real people are played by actors: Jeff Garlin as Larry’s manager, for example, or Cheryl Hines as Cheryl David.

    • A “rough outline” is developed for the episode.

    • No definitive script is completed.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • How Curb is Done (continued):

    • Actors customarily rehearse prior to shooting.

    • Actors work through a given scene with a clear knowledge of what must be accomplished in it but improvising their lines.

    • Ordinarily five takes of a scene are shot.

    • The best of the takes becomes part of the final cut, which generally has a kind of documentary feel.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    • Curb Season Arcs: Curb is unusual in having season long, multi-episode arcs for each season except the first.

    • Season Two: Larry tries to create a new television series for Seinfeld alumni.

    • Season Three: Larry becomes a partner in the opening of a new restaurant.

    • Season Four: Larry is cast in a new production of Mel Brooks’ The Producers & tries to act on a promise from Cheryl that he can have an affair on their 10th anniversary.

    • Season Five: Larry becomes convinced that he is adopted and seeks out his biological parents and may have to donate a kidney to Lewis.

    • Season Six: The Davids take in a homeless “Katrina” family

    • Season Seven: Larry finally agrees to a Seinfeld reunion show.


    Cult television

    Larry David on Trial. “If put on trial for his ‘crimes’ (as were the 'New York Four' in the final episode of Seinfeld), Larry would certainly be found guilty by any jury in the world. But guilty of what? Of breaking up a full-immersion baptism (which he mistakes for a drowning) and then accepting the out of place praise of his fellow Jews for stopping a conversion? ('The Baptism,' 2.9). Of missing his mother’s funeral and then repeatedly exploiting her death for his own gain? ('The Special Section,' 3.6). Of lusting after the Virgin Mary and then coughing up a pubic hair? ('Mary, Joseph, and Larry,' 3.9). Of stabbing Ben Stiller in the eye with a skewer? ('Ben’s Birthday Party,' 4.2). Of stealing a gold club from a coffin? ('The 5 Wood,' 4.5). Of hiring a prostitute so he can drive in the HOV lane? ('The Car Pool Lane,' 4.6). . . .

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Larry David on Trial (continued). “Of buying 'Girls Gone Wild, College Edition'? ('Wandering Bear,' 4.8). Of feigning (1) racism—to avoid jury duty ('The Car Pool Lane'), (2) a handicap—to jump the line in a restroom ('The Bowtie,' 5.2), and (3) a heart condition—to escape a tire-iron wielding thug? ('The Surrogate,' 4.7). Of driving Yoshi to suicide by his jests concerning his failed kamikaze father? ('The Kamikaze Bingo,' 5.4). Of inviting a child molester to a seder? ('The Seder,' 5.7). Of pretending to be an orthodox Jew in order to suck up to the head of the kidney consortium in a scheme to get out of donating the organ he has promised Lewis, offering the man’s very hungry, ultra-religious daughter a pair of edible panties to eat, and accusing a woman of hiding Mickey Mantle’s 500th homerun ball in her 'unusually large vagina'? ('The Ski Lift,' 5.9). To the delight of viewers, the list could go on and on.

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    “I will tell you all about Season Five, and don’t let Larry know I told you this. Larry’s going to say things that are going to upset people. They are going to get very mad at him, and there will be a big misunderstanding. He’ll try to clear it up, things will get worse, they’ll snowball, and it will all blow up in his face at the end of every episode. That’s just for you. Nobody else should know that.”--Robert Weide, Curb Producer and Director

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Curb Your Enthusiasm, “The Grand Opening” (3.10)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    The Daily Show (Comedy Central, 1996- ) and The Colbert Report (Comedy Central, 2005)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Stephen Colbert at the Whitehouse Correspondents’ Dinner

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Futurama (FOX, 1999-2003; Comedy Central, 2008- )

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Matt Groening (US, The Simpsons, Futurama)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Cult Television

    Philip J. Fry (Billy West)

    Turanga Leela (Katey Sagal)

    Bender Bending Rodríguez (John DiMaggio)

    Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth (Billy West)


    Cult television

    Amy Wong

    (Lauren Tom)

    Dr. John A. Zoidberg (Billy West)

    Hermes Conrad (Phil LaMarr)

    Nibbler (Frank Welker)

    Zapp Brannigan (Billy West)

    Lieutenant Kif Kroker (Maurice LaMarche)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • In Hypno-Vision

    • As seen on TV

    • Presented in BC [Brain Control] Where Available

    • Featuring gratuitous alien nudity

    • Loading...

    • Presented in double vision (where drunk)

    • Mr. Bender's Wardrobe By Robotany 500

    • Condemned by the Space Pope

    • Filmed On Location

    • Transmitido en Martian en SAP

    • Proudly Made on Earth

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • Live from Omicron Persei 8

    • Made from meat by-products

    • >>Not Y3K Compliant<<

    • From The Makers Of Futurama

    • Based On a True Story

    • From the network that brought you "The Simpsons"

    • The show that watches back

    • Not Based On The Novel By James Fenimore Cooper

    • Nominated For Three Glemmys

    • This episode has been modified to fit your primitive screen

    • Coming soon to an illegal DVD

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • As foretold by Nostradamus

    • A Stern Warning of Things to Come

    • Simulcast on Crazy People's Fillings

    • Larva-tested, pupa-approved

    • For external use only

    • Painstakingly drawn before a live audience

    • Touch eyeballs to screen for cheap laser surgery

    • Smell-O-Vision Users Insert Nose Tubes Now.

    • Not a Substitute for Human Interaction

    • Secreted by the Comedy Bee

    • If not entertaining, write your congressman

    • This episode performed entirely by sock puppets

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • Broadcast simultaneously one year in the future

    • Now with Chucklelin

    • Torn from tomorrow's headlines

    • 80% entertainment by volume

    • Deciphered From Crop Circles

    • Please rise for the Futurama theme song

    • Krafted with luv

    • by monsters

    • Bender's Humor by Microsoft Joke

    • Disclaimer: Any resemblance to actual robots would be really cool

    • Federal law prohibits changing the channel

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • For proper viewing, take red pill now

    • No humans were probed in the making of this episode

    • Scratch here to reveal prize

    • Psst... Big party at your house after the show!

    • Hey TiVo! Suggest this!

    • Fun for the whole family except grandma and grandpa

    • Please turn off all cell phones and tricorders

    • Love it or shove it

    • If accidentally watched, induce vomiting.

    • Bigfoot's choice

    • It's like "hee haw" with lasers

    • When you see the robot, drink!

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • Soon to be a major religion

    • Or is it?

    • Controlling you through a chip in your butt since 1999

    • Not affilliated with Futurama Brass Knuckle Co.

    • Known to cause insanity in laboratory mice

    • Now interactive! Joystick controls Fry's left ear

    • Dancing space potatoes?

    • You bet!

    • Where no fan has gone before

    • A by-product of the TV industry

    • Too hot for radio

    • You can't prove it won't happen

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • Beats a hard kick to the face

    • Voted "best"

    • [in Alien Alphabet 1] Thanks for watching, Futurama slave army!

    • See you on some other channel

    • It just won't stay dead!

    • Watch, Rinse, Repeat

    • Apply directly to the foreclaw

    • Last known transmission of the Hubble Telescope

    • The Proud Result of Prison Labor

    • It Makes a Nice Sandwich

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • 0100100001101001 [which translates to "Hi" in ASCII]

    • The Robots are Coming! The Robots are Coming!

    • The flames in your TV are not part of the show

    • The episode they'll be thinking about by the water cooler, but not mentioning specifically

    • Current eBay bid: $8.51

    • Collect all fifty billion!

    • <ESP> Closed-captioned for the ESP-impaired

    • If you can read this, thank us!

    • Now available without a prescription

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • It just won't stay dead!

    • The Proud Result of Prison Labor

    • The flames in your TV are not part of the show

    • [in Alien Language 1] The humans shall not defeat us

    • Rebirth

    • Apply directly to the eyes

    • There will be a test

    • Dictated but not read

    • Put on 3-D monocle now

    • Made you look!

    • If you don't watch it, someone else will

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    • Futurama Title Captions

    • List of title captions

    • This time, it's personal

    • What happens in Cygnus 1-X stays in Cygnus 1-X

    • Two scoops of pixels in every scene

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    How I Met Your Mother (CBS, 2005)

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net5

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Carter Bays (r) and Craig Thomas (l) (US, How I Met Your Mother)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    South Park (Comedy Central, 1997- )

    Cult Television


    Television creators small screen auteurs davidlavery net6

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Matt Stone (left) and Trey Parker (right) (US, South Park)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Weeds (Showtime, 2005- )

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Jenji Kohan (US, Weeds)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    American Cult Comedy

    Wonderfalls (FOX, 2004)

    Cult Television


    Cult television

    Television Creators: Small Screen Auteurs davidlavery.net

    Bryan Fuller (US, Wonderfalls, Dead Like Me, Heroes, Pushing Daisies)

    Cult Television


  • Login