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Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Your Health Promotion Programs. A 6-Week Public Health Course Week 4: Best Practices/SMART Goals and Objectives/Logic Model. Today:. Discuss the educational and ecological assessment & administration and policy review

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Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Your Health Promotion Programs

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Planning implementing and evaluating your health promotion programs
Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Your Health Promotion Programs

A 6-Week Public Health Course

Week 4: Best Practices/SMART Goals and Objectives/Logic Model


Today
Today: Programs

  • Discuss the educational and ecological assessment & administration and policy review

  • Best practices—how to find them/concept of metaevaluation

  • Setting program goals and SMART objectives

  • Logic model


Predisposing factors
Predisposing Factors Programs

  • Alcohol and drug use

  • Not taking risk seriously/can’t happen to them

  • STIs are no big deal

  • Belief that condoms are not cool

  • Females lack of assertiveness

  • Thrill of being caught

  • Lack of education

  • Depression

  • Multiple partners considered cool

  • Risk is worth it

  • Peer pressure

  • Keep a partner who refuses to use condoms (don’t want to make him mad)

  • History of casual sex partners

  • Condoms take away pleasure/spontaneity

  • Males feel they must be assertive/aggressive

  • Can’t define STIs/HIV as a STI

  • Girls want to get pregnant

  • Cultural beliefs/norms

  • The condoms the center provides are “junk” and break easily

  • Feel judged when asking for a condom

  • Feel condoms not necessary when on BC

  • Out of touch with reality


Enabling factors
Enabling Factors Programs

  • TEAP involvement

  • Relationship classes

  • Condom availability

  • Rules/regulations

  • Norms on center

  • Rumor of “wild animals” in the woods

  • Signs to signify off-limit areas

  • Self esteem, self appreciation groups

  • Graphic bulletin board of STIs

  • Alcohol prevalent on center

  • Standards of care

  • Access to care/community agencies

  • Wellness center open hours

  • JC “no sex” policy

  • Wellness provides class in CPP

  • 1:1 counseling available


Reinforcing factors
Reinforcing Factors Programs

  • Wellness staff always open and approachable

  • Peers/staff and student mentors

  • Rapport between staff and students

  • Residential advisors present topic at dorm meetings

  • Local community organizations

  • Social living staff

  • Student leaders openly express support for condoms

  • Posters/print campaign

  • Message is repeated often through many channels


Discussion of articles
Discussion of Articles Programs

  • Condom Use with “Casual” and “Main” Partners: What’s in a Name?

  • Effective Targeted and Community HIV/STD Prevention Programs (social norms/opinion leaders)

  • Effective Approaches to Reducing Adolescent Unprotected Sex, Pregnancy, and Childbearing


Best practices metaevaluation
Best Practices/ ProgramsMetaevaluation

  • Find what worked other places…ok to steal (just give credit)

  • Use to answer, “How will we do this?” (e.g., what is the best way to teach condom negotiation skills?)

  • RECAPP, PubMed, Google Scholar

  • Focus groups



Program goal
Program Goal Programs

  • Will your program make an impact on the health status ?

    • Will STI prevalence go down? (probably not that you will be able to tell)

    • Make something up. What do you really want to happen? Reduce the life-long incidence of STIs in JC students at your center?


Smart objectives
SMART Objectives Programs

  • Specific

  • Measurable

  • Attainable

  • Realistic

  • Time-sensitive


Turn this into a smart objective
Turn This Into a SMART Objective Programs

  • Decrease # of students who report having unprotected sex in the past month

  • Make condoms available

  • Decrease access to secluded areas on center

  • Increase condom negotiation skills


Make sure your objectives
Make sure your objectives… Programs

  • Relate to student behaviors or environmental changes

  • Make sure activities reflect each of your objectives


The logic model
The Logic Model Programs

  • Planning and evaluation tool

  • Shows linkages between investments and activities, outputs and expected outcomes

  • Communicates externally the rationale, activities, and expected results

  • Tests whether the policy, program or initiative “makes sense”

  • Provides fundamental framework on which the evaluation strategies are based

Source: United States Department of Agriculture. (2009). Logic Models. Available at: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/about/strat_plan_logic_models.html


Homework
Homework Programs

  • Add to homework #3 (no need to resubmit)

  • Program goals and objectives

  • Edit the Logic Model

  • Find one best practice, article, or activity idea from an evidence-based program that will help you plan your activities(e.g., how do you teach condom negotiation skills?) (RECAPP is a good place to start)

  • Email the article or link to the entire group with a 2-3 sentence summary and read pertinent information that others have shared


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