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Transforming Secondary Schools for the 21st Century. Bob Pearlman [email protected] http://www.bobpearlman.org Ashford, Kent November 12, 2004 Download Slides at http://www.bobpearlman.org/Kent.htm.

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slide1

Transforming Secondary Schools

for the 21st Century

Bob Pearlman

[email protected]://www.bobpearlman.org

Ashford, Kent

November 12, 2004

Download Slides at http://www.bobpearlman.org/Kent.htm

slide2

Building Schools for the Future (BSF) will evolve in stages over 10-15 years - from early consultation and planning to completion of new buildings at hundreds of school sites across England.

Waves One, Two, and Three

slide3

‘Fulfilling the Potential – Transforming Teaching and Learning through ICT in Schools’

  • The aims for the next stage of development will be to ensure that for all schools:
  • ICT makes a significant contribution to teaching and learning across all subjects and ages, inside and outside the curriculum;
  • ICT is used to improve access to learning for pupils with a diverse range of individual needs, including those with SEN and disabilities;
  • ICT is used as a tool for whole-school improvement;
  • ICT is used as a means of enabling learning to take place more easily beyond the bounds of the formal school organisation and outside the school day; and
  • ICT capabilities are developed as key skills essential for participation in today’s society and economy.

Department for Education and Skills

May 2003

slide4

Eight key reforms:

1. Guaranteed three-year budgets for every school from 2006, geared to pupil numbers, with every school also guaranteed a minimum per pupil increase each year.

2. Universal specialist schools – and better specialist schools.

3. Freedom for all secondary schools to own their land and buildings, manage their assets, employ their staff, improve their governing bodies, and forge partnerships with outside sponsors and educational foundations.

4. More places in popular schools.

5. A ‘new relationship with schools’ to cut the red tape involved in accountability, without cutting schools adrift.

6. 200 academies by 2010 – and more new schools.

7. Every secondary school to be refurbished or rebuilt to a modern standard over the next 10 to 15 years ( ‘Building Schools for the Future’ programme).

8. ‘Foundation partnerships’

slide5

Why is reform needed?

1. This report sets out our proposals and recommendations for reforming 14-19 curriculum and qualifications, building on strengths within the current system while addressing its weaknesses, to:

• Raise participation and achievement – by tackling the educational causes of disengagement and underachievement and low post-16 participation.

• Get the basics right – ensuring that young people achieve specified levels in functional mathematics, literacy and communication and ICT, and are equipped with the knowledge,skills and attributes needed to succeed in adult life, further learning and employment.

• Strengthen vocational routes – improving the quality and status of vocational programmes delivered by schools, colleges and training providers, setting out the features of high quality provision and identifying a clear role for employers.

• Provide greater stretch and challenge – ensuring opportunities for greater breadth and depth of learning. This will help employers and universities to differentiate more effectively between top performers. Stretch and challenge at all levels will encourage young people to think for themselves and be innovative and creative about their learning.

• Reduce the assessment burden for learners, teachers, institutions and the system as a whole by reducing the number of times learners are examined; extending the role of teacher assessment; and changing assessment in A levels in order to improve the quality of teaching and learning.

• Make the system more transparent and easier to understand by rationalising 14-19 curriculum and qualifications within a diploma framework, where progression routes and the value of qualifications are clear.

slide6

Well-Identified Problem Set

    • Poor school buildings
    • Need to now integrate ICT into the subject classrooms and across the schools
    • 50% loss of young people who do not pursue post-secondary education
    • Coasting and cruising schools
  • But what is being missed?
  • What dangers are there in this agenda?
slide7

UK Educational White Papers lack vision of:

  • 21st Century Learning
  • ICT as Tool and Infrastructure for 21st Century Learning
your high school 1964
Your High School, 1964-- ???

Where were you in 1964?

penncrest high school media pa
Penncrest High School, Media, PA
  • 9th grade house
  • Flexibility to adapt to departmental or team structure
  • Flexible classrooms that can be adapted to different instructional uses
  • Community Center
  • Capacity 1600
slide10
Constructivist Learning
  • Block Schedule
  • Professional Community
  • Professional Development Center
  • The Learning Center
  • Project Rooms in every wing
  • Open public ceremonial space
slide11

The BSF Opportunity….

Total UK Investment = £ 46 billion over 10 years

slide12

The BSF Challenge 1: Getting Ready

School Opening for 2007-8

Construction 2006-7

Physical design 2005-6

Educational Design by ……

Is BSF a Construction Program or an Educational Program?

Are you being asked to spend money before we know what to do?

the bsf challenge 2 classroom learning environments
The BSF Challenge 2: Classroom Learning Environments
  • DFES Regulations – Classrooms are 55 square meters (605 square feet)
  • Large Classrooms at Napa New Tech High School are 127 square meters (1400 square feet) to 164 square meters (1800 square feet)
slide14

The BSF Danger….

Some say if you get the design right, then the education will follow???

Will the new BSF Schools just be Old Wine in New Bottles?

slide15

Kids Needs:

  • Safe
  • Respect
  • Personal
  • Interests

Design Criteria

  • Experience
  • Real World
  • Workspace
  • Tools
  • Personalization
  • Common Learning Goals
  • Adult World Immersion
  • Performance-Based Student Work & Assessment

Design Principles

Design

Elements

Program, Facility, Transitions, Exhibitions, Advisories (Pastoral system), Technology, Projects, Portfolios, Internships, School Size and Team Sizes

slide16

‘Fulfilling the Potential – Transforming Teaching and Learning through ICT in Schools’

Department for Education and Skills

May 2003

slide17

Excerpt from DRAFT New Basics Technical Paper, Version: 3 April 2000, Education Queensland http://education.qld.gov.au/corporate/newbasics/html/library.html#techpaper

Bigum et al.’s (1997) findings indicate that the use and adaptation of IT by schools has reached a conceptual and practical impasse.

It would appear that much of the IT use … is for extremely inauthentic and uncritical pedagogy (e.g. word processing, replication by rote, lower-order thinking, and other largely irrelevant activities in IT-based instruction). In more recent studies …, Bigum and colleagues indicate that too many students engage in simple information reproduction activities and too few students use IT to produce new and locally relevant knowledge.

The consensus from these recent studies corroborates the constructivist philosophy taken by Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) in Springfield (Dwyer, 1994): That technology in and of itself will not solve the problem, but that its use must be accompanied by a pedagogical revolution. Until IT is more commonly used for educational practices that are constructivist and problem-based, locally relevant and critical, it has little hope of fundamentally changing patterns of student outcomes and achievement.

IT is neither the problem nor the solution. It can, however, play a key role in a futures-oriented reform of pedagogy. It can do so both as an instructional mode and as a medium for building and sustaining professional development learning communities.

slide20

Dongguan

  • 7 million people. Grew from less than 1 million in 1979
  • 15,000 International Companies
  • 25,000 companies total -- 10,000 of them are computer related manufacturers, representing 40% of all international computer part market
  • Ranked 7th in overall municipal competitiveness in China
  • Ranked 3rd in goods exported, behind Shanghai and Shenzhen
slide22

Bangalore

  • Silicon Valley of India
  • 7.2 million people, 5th largest city in India (+ 1 billion people)
  • 86% literacy
  • 1154 IT SW companies in 2003, up from 29 in 1993
  • 116 new SW technology part units established in 2002-3

Top Ten SW Exporters, 2002-03:

Infosys Technologies Ltd.

Wipro Ltd.

IBM Global Services India Pvt. Ltd.

Tata Consultancy Services Ltd.

Digital Global Soft. Ltd.

I-Flex Solutions Ltd.

Texas Instruments

Cisco Systems (India) Pvt. Ltd.

Mphasis BFL Ltd.

Philips Software Centre

slide23

Small and Smaller: The third era of globalization is shrinking the world from size small to a size tiny.

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN, March 4, 2004

Globalization 1.0

From the late 1800\'s to World War I, was driven by falling transportation costs, thanks to the steamship and the railroad. shrank the world from a size large to a size medium.

Globalization 2.0

From the 1980\'s to 2000, was based on falling telecom costs and the PC, and shrank the world from a size medium to a size small.

slide24

Small and Smaller: The third era of globalization is shrinking the world from size small to a size tiny.

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN, March 4, 2004

  • Globalization 3.0
  • Produced by three forces:
  • Massive installation of undersea fiber-optic cable and bandwidth (thanks to the dot-com bubble) that have made it possible to globally transmit and store huge amounts of data for almost nothing.
  • Second, the diffusion of PC\'s around the world.
  • Third, the convergence of a variety of software applications — from e-mail, to Google, to Microsoft Office, to specially designed outsourcing programs — that, when combined with all those PC\'s and bandwidth, made it possible to create global "work-flow platforms."
slide28

Global Internet Cluster Regions

Canada

“Silicon Valley North”

United Kingdom

“Silicon Kingdom”

Scandinavia

“Wireless Valley”

Japan

“Bit Valley”

Germany

“Silicon Saxony”

China/Hong Kong

“Cyber Port”

France

“Telecom Valley”

Israel

“Silicon wadi”

India

Singapore

“Intelligent Island”

United States

slide29

Silicon Valley, 2000

40% of workforce in 7

high-tech clusters

slide30

Silicon Valley, 1970

VALLEY OF HEART’S DELIGHT

slide31

Source: Internet Cluster Analysis, 1999, A.T. Kearney, published by Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network

slide32

What knowledge and skills do students need for the 21st Century?

  • “Will this generation of learners have the skills and preparation to innovate?”
          • -- Barry Schuler, Former CEO, AOL
          • At NTHS Founder’s Day Event
slide33
SCANS U.S. Department of Labor Secretary\'s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills

COMPETENCIES - Effective workers can productively use:

  • Resources - allocating time, money, materials, space and staff.
  • Interpersonal Skills - working on teams, teaching others, serving customers, leading, negotiating, and working well with people from culturally diverse backgrounds.
  • Information - acquiring and evaluating data, organizing and maintaining files, interpreting and communication, and using computers to process information.
  • Systems - understanding social, organizational and technological systems, monitoring and correcting performance, and designing or improving systems.
  • Technology - selecting equipment and tools, applying technology to specific tasks, and maintaining and troubleshooting technologies.

FOUNDATIONS - Competence requires:

  • Basic Skills - reading, writing, arithmetic and mathematics, speaking and listening.
  • Thinking Skills - thinking creatively, making decisions, solving problems, seeing things in the mind\'s eye, knowing how to learn, and reasoning.
  • Personal Qualities - individual responsibilities, self-esteem, sociability, self-management, and integrity.

1992

slide37

The Primary National Strategy moves this thinking on by articulating 7 aspects of learning:

  • enquiry
  • problem solving
  • creativity
  • information processing
  • reasoning
  • evaluation
  • personal, emotional and social skills

But Why and How?

slide38

New Technology HS

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
  • CAREER PREPARATION
  • CITIZENSHIP AND ETHICS
  • CURRICULAR LITERACY (CONTENT STANDARDS)
  • TECHNOLOGY LITERACY
  • COLLABORATION
  • CRITICAL THINKING
  • ORAL COMMUNICATION
slide45

New Technology High School

Napa, California

http://www.newtechhigh.org/

  • Integrating technology into every class
  • Interdisciplinary and project-based
  • Internship class consisting of classroom curriculum and work-based learning in regional companies
  • Digital Portfolio

http://www.newtechfoundation.org/

slide46

COMMON MISCONCEPTION

Technology is the Tool, Not the Focus

Less than 20% of our students are interested in pursuing a career in technology.

slide47

INTEGRATED COURSES

  • AMERICAN STUDIES
    • United States History American Literature
  • SCIENTIFIC STUDIES
    • Algebra II
    • Physics
  • POLITICAL STUDIES
    • Government/Economics
    • Political Literature

2 teachers, 45 students, meeting for 2 hour blocks each day

slide48

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

DIGITAL MEDIA

COLLEGE COURSES

SENIOR PROJECTS

PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIOS

INTERNSHIPS & COMMUNITY SERVICE

slide49

At the core is a student centered, project and problem based teaching strategy that is tied to both content standards and school wide learning outcomes.

slide54

Internships

  • Major impact on high school performance
  • Major impact on Post-secondary success
slide55

Transform the Secondary School Student Experience!

Personalization

Projects

Exhibitions

Digital Portfolios

Internships

Technology

slide62

TECHNOLOGY TOOLS

FOR …

  • Learning
  • Curriculum
  • Communication
  • Assessment
  • Scalability*
  • Computerized Tutorials
  • On-Line Curriculum
  • E-Library
  • Academic Systems
  • Project Standardization
  • Digital Textbooks
  • Document Libraries
  • Project Design Template
  • Online Curriculum
  • Internship Coordination
  • Student E-Mail
  • Parent E-Bulletin
  • Collaboration Database
  • Learning Logs
  • Digital Gradebooks
  • Student Journals
  • Support Databases
  • Account Management
  • PBL Unit Library
  • Customizable Templates
slide63

TOOLS: PROJECT BRIEFCASE

The Project Briefcase allows teachers to put all project materials in one spot for easy student access and to share with other teachers.

slide64

The New Technology Project Library

We have assembled a collection of projects created by teachers trained in PBL unit development, reviewed, and tested in the classroom. These projects can be downloaded and modified by any teacher with a connection to the internet.

slide65

TOOLS: COURSE AGENDA

The Course Agenda helps keep complicated projects organized.

slide72

New Technology High School Grads:

  • Average Kids  97% Post-Secondary
          • Powerful
          • Articulate
          • Self-Directed
          • Collaborative
          • Leaders & Entrepreneurs
slide73

3 Recommendations for Kent Head Teachers:

1. Go see exemplars of 21st Century Learning

slide74

Community of New Innovative High Schools

The Met (1997)

http://www.metcenter.org

Napa New Technology High School (1997)

http://www.newtechhigh.org

High Tech High (2000)

http://www.hightechhigh.org

slide75

NEW TECHNOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL

Study Toursand Visits

http://www.newtechfoundation.org

slide77

Ninestiles, Birmingham

(new Year 7 program)

Hugh Christie Technology College

New Build for 2006

Homewood School, Kent

(new block for KS3 Rich Tasks Curriculum, OLC)

slide78

June 2004 to July 2005: Pilot Rich Task Curriculum for Year 7

August 2005: New F Block, New KS3 curriculum based on Rich Tasks for Years 7 and 8

slide79

Recommendation 2: Collaborate

  • Create a Cluster/Learning Community of Emerging 21st Century Schools in Kent to share best practices
  • Hold an annual conference on 21st Century Learning for heads and teachers
  • Conduct Study Tours and Critical Friends visits to Emerging 21st Century Schools
slide80

Recommendation 3: Start pilots of the New Learning Environments (Rich Tasks, PBL) Now!

Educators need to write the Educational Specifications for the New Builds!

Make BSF an Educational Program, not a Construction Program!

slide81

Leadership: Will you lead the transformation to 21st Century Learning and Build a 21st Century School? Or will you just make old wine in new bottles?

Where were you in 2004?

contact information
Contact Information

Bob Pearlman

Director of Strategic Planning

[email protected]

www.bobpearlman.org

520-881-9965

PowerPoint Slides at www.bobpearlman.org/Kent.htm

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