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Teachers only

Teachers Only

The point of this slideshow is to give you a lesson to help your students make the most of the district essay. This lesson will take approximately 50 minutes to complete. Students will be led through the prompt, rubric, and anchor essays to help them develop a better understanding of why they received the score they did and how they can improve in the future.

Every instance where students are asked to do write something down or respond you will see a highlighted area.

This slideshow doesn’t write down every comment word for word. There are several instances where you will have the opportunity to discuss concepts as a class.

Any questions or comments you have to improve this would be appreciated. Please send these to [email protected] .


Students please do the following

Students please do the following…

  • Get out a blank piece of paper and your district essay.

  • Read your district essay.

  • On a blank sheet of paper answer the following questions:

    • Why do you think you received the score you did?

    • How could you have done better?

  • Hopefully, by the end of this presentation you will have a much clearer answer to both of these questions.


Teachers only

First let’s take another look at

the Writing Task just to make sure

everyone understands exactly what

they were supposed to write about.

PLEASE FIND THE WRITING TASK LABELED ON YOUR DISTRICT ESSAY.


Here is the writing task

Here is the Writing Task:

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?


Let s take a closer look at the writing task

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.


Let s take a closer look at the writing task1

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.


Let s take a closer look at the writing task2

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.

  • Now circle specific terms that you must understand and write what you think each term means.


Let s take a closer look at the writing task3

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.

  • Now circle specific terms that you must understand and write what you think each term means.


Let s take a closer look at the writing task4

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Author’s Tone:

The author’s attitude toward the subject

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.

  • Now circle specific terms that you must understand and write what you think each term means.


Let s take a closer look at the writing task5

Let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Author’s Tone:

The author’s attitude toward the subject

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie, write an essay responding to the following:

How did the author’s tone change after encountering the theme of aging and death through conversations with Morrie? How might you apply Morrie’s advice on growing older to your own life?

  • In order to succeed on an essay like this you need to make sure you write about everything that is required.

  • Go sentence by sentence and underline everything you must accomplish in your essay.

  • Now circle specific terms that you must understand and write what you think each term means.

  • On your sheet of paper, please respond to the following questions:

    • Think back to your essay: Did you address all of these tasks?

    • Did you clearly show that you understood all of the terms?


Now let s take a closer look at the writing task

Now let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

  • Don’t just read!

  • Remember our writing tasks:

  • Author’s Tone Change about aging

  • Lessons about aging you can apply to your own life

From Tuesdays with Morrie, by Mitch Albom

Later that day, we talked about aging. Or maybe I should say the fear of aging—another of the issues on my what’s-bugging-my generation list. On my ride from the Boston airport, I had counted the billboards that featured young and beautiful people. There was a handsome young man in a cowboy hat,…two beautiful young women smiling over a shampoo bottle, a sultry-looking teenager…and a sexy woman in a black velvet dress, next to a man in a tuxedo…

Not once did I see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five. I told Morrie I was already feeling over the hill, much as I tried desperately to stay on top of it. I worked out constantly. Watched what I ate. Checked my hairline in the mirror. I had gone from being proud to say my age—because of all I had done so young—to not bringing it up, for fear I was getting too close to forty and, therefore, professional oblivion.

Morrie had aging in better perspective.

“All this emphasis on youth—don’t buy it,” he said. “Listen, I know what a misery being young can be, so don’t tell me it’s so great. All these kids who came to me with their struggles, their strife, their feeling of inadequacy, their sense that life was miserable…

As you read please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

From Tuesdays with Morrie, by Mitch Albom

Later that day, we talked about aging. Or maybe I should say the fear of aging—another of the issues on my what’s-bugging-my generation list. On my ride from the Boston airport, I had counted the billboards that featured young and beautiful people. There was a handsome young man in a cowboy hat,…two beautiful young women smiling over a shampoo bottle, a sultry-looking teenager…and a sexy woman in a black velvet dress, next to a man in a tuxedo…

Not once did I see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five. I told Morrie I was already feeling over the hill, much as I tried desperately to stay on top of it. I worked out constantly. Watched what I ate. Checked my hairline in the mirror. I had gone from being proud to say my age—because of all I had done so young—to not bringing it up, for fear I was getting too close to forty and, therefore, professional oblivion.

Morrie had aging in better perspective.

“All this emphasis on youth—don’t buy it,” he said. “Listen, I know what a misery being young can be, so don’t tell me it’s so great. All these kids who came to me with their struggles, their strife, their feeling of inadequacy, their sense that life was miserable…


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task1

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

From Tuesdays with Morrie, by Mitch Albom

Later that day, we talked about aging. Or maybe I should say the fear of aging—another of the issues on my what’s-bugging-my generation list. On my ride from the Boston airport, I had counted the billboards that featured young and beautiful people. There was a handsome young man in a cowboy hat,…two beautiful young women smiling over a shampoo bottle, a sultry-looking teenager…and a sexy woman in a black velvet dress, next to a man in a tuxedo…

Not once did I see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five. I told Morrie I was already feeling over the hill, much as I tried desperately to stay on top of it. I worked out constantly. Watched what I ate. Checked my hairline in the mirror. I had gone from being proud to say my age—because of all I had done so young—to not bringing it up, for fear I was getting too close to forty and, therefore, professional oblivion.

Morrie had aging in better perspective.

“All this emphasis on youth—don’t buy it,” he said. “Listen, I know what a misery being young can be, so don’t tell me it’s so great. All these kids who came to me with their struggles, their strife, their feeling of inadequacy, their sense that life was miserable…

Author’s Tone

Morrie’s Lesson


Now let s take a closer look at the writing task1

Now let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

“And, in addition to all the miseries, the young are not wise. They have very little understanding about life. Who wants to live when you don’t know what’s going on? When people are manipulating you, telling you to buy this perfume and you’ll be beautiful, or this pair of jeans and you’ll be sexy—and you believe them! It’s such nonsense.”

Weren’t you ever afraid to grow old, I asked?

“Mitch, I embrace aging.”

Embrace it?

“It’s very simple. As you grow, you learn more. If you stayed at twenty-two, you’d always be as ignorant as you were at twenty-two. Aging is not just decay, you know. It’s growth. It’s more than the negative that you’re going to die, it’s also the positive that you live better life because of it.”

Yes, I said, but if aging were so valuable, why do people always say, “Oh, if I were young again.” You never hear people say, “I wish I were sixty-five.”

He smiled. “You know what that reflects? Unsatisfied lives. Unfulfilled lives. Lives that haven’t found meaning. Because if you’ve found meaning in your life, you don’t want to go back. You want to go forward. You want to see more, do more. You can’t wait until sixty-five.


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task2

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

“And, in addition to all the miseries, the young are not wise. They have very little understanding about life. Who wants to live when you don’t know what’s going on? When people are manipulating you, telling you to buy this perfume and you’ll be beautiful, or this pair of jeans and you’ll be sexy—and you believe them! It’s such nonsense.”

Weren’t you ever afraid to grow old, I asked?

“Mitch, I embrace aging.”

Embrace it?

“It’s very simple. As you grow, you learn more. If you stayed at twenty-two, you’d always be as ignorant as you were at twenty-two. Aging is not just decay, you know. It’s growth. It’s more than the negative that you’re going to die, it’s also the positive that you live better life because of it.”

Yes, I said, but if aging were so valuable, why do people always say, “Oh, if I were young again.” You never hear people say, “I wish I were sixty-five.”

He smiled. “You know what that reflects? Unsatisfied lives. Unfulfilled lives. Lives that haven’t found meaning. Because if you’ve found meaning in your life, you don’t want to go back. You want to go forward. You want to see more, do more. You can’t wait until sixty-five.

Author’s Tone

Morrie’s Lesson


Now let s take a closer look at the writing task2

Now let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

“Listen. You should know something. All younger people should know something. If you’re always battling against getting older, you’re always going to be unhappy, because it will happen anyhow.

“And Mitch?”

He lowered his voice.

“The fact is, you are going to die eventually.”

I know.

“But hopefully,” he said, “not for a long, long time.”

He closed his eyes with a peaceful look, then asked me to adjust the pillows behind his head. His body needed constant adjustment to stay comfortable. It was propped up in the chair with white pillows, yellow foam, and blue towels. At a quick glance, it seemed as if Morrie were being packed for shipping.

“Thank you,” he whispered as I moved the pillows.

No problem, I said.


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task3

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

“Listen. You should know something. All younger people should know something. If you’re always battling against getting older, you’re always going to be unhappy, because it will happen anyhow.

“And Mitch?”

He lowered his voice.

“The fact is, you are going to die eventually.”

I know.

“But hopefully,” he said, “not for a long, long time.”

He closed his eyes with a peaceful look, then asked me to adjust the pillows behind his head. His body needed constant adjustment to stay comfortable. It was propped up in the chair with white pillows, yellow foam, and blue towels. At a quick glance, it seemed as if Morrie were being packed for shipping.

“Thank you,” he whispered as I moved the pillows.

No problem, I said.

Author’s Tone

Morrie’s Lesson


Now let s take a closer look at the writing task3

Now let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

“Mitch. What are you thinking?”

I paused before answering. Okay, I said, I’m wondering how you don’t envy younger, healthy people.

“Oh, I guess I do.” He closed his eyes. “I envy them being able to go to the health club, or go for a swim. Or dance. Mostly for dancing. But envy comes to me, I feel it, and then I let it go. Remember what I said about detachment? Let it go. Tell yourself, ‘That’s envy, I’m going to separate from it now.’ And walk away.”

He coughed—a long scratchy cough—and he pushed a tissue to his mouth and spit weakly into it. Sitting there, I felt so much stronger than he, ridiculously so, as if I could lift him and toss him in any other way.

How do you keep from envying…

“What?”

Me?


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task4

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

“Mitch. What are you thinking?”

I paused before answering. Okay, I said, I’m wondering how you don’t envy younger, healthy people.

“Oh, I guess I do.” He closed his eyes. “I envy them being able to go to the health club, or go for a swim. Or dance. Mostly for dancing. But envy comes to me, I feel it, and then I let it go. Remember what I said about detachment? Let it go. Tell yourself, ‘That’s envy, I’m going to separate from it now.’ And walk away.”

He coughed—a long scratchy cough—and he pushed a tissue to his mouth and spit weakly into it. Sitting there, I felt so much stronger than he, ridiculously so, as if I could lift him and toss him in any other way.

How do you keep from envying…

“What?”

Me?

Author’s Tone

Morrie’s Lesson


Now let s take a closer look at the writing task4

Now let’s take a closer look at the writing task…

He smiled.

“Mitch, it is impossible for the old not to envy the young. But the issue is to accept who you are and revel in that. This is your time to be in your thirties. I had my time to be in my thirties, and now is my time to be seventy-eight.

“You have to find what’s good and true and beautiful in your life as it is now. Looking back makes you competitive. And, age is not a competitive issue.”

He exhaled and lowered his eyes, as if to watch his breath scatter into the air.

“The truth is, part of me is every age. I’m a three-year-old, I’m a five-year-old, I’m a thirty-seven-year-old, I’m a fifty-year-old. I’ve been through all of them, and I know what it’s like. I delight in being a child when it’s appropriate to be a child. I delight in being a wise old man when it’s appropriate to be a wise old man. Think of all I can be! I am every age, up to my own. Do you understand?”

I nodded.

“How can I be envious of where you are—when I’ve been there myself?”


Now let s take a n even closer look at the writing task5

Now let’s take a(n) even closer look at the writing task…

Please highlight text that you could quote/cite in your essay that would support our writing tasks.

He smiled.

“Mitch, it is impossible for the old not to envy the young. But the issue is to accept who you are and revel in that. This is your time to be in your thirties. I had my time to be in my thirties, and now is my time to be seventy-eight.

“You have to find what’s good and true and beautiful in your life as it is now. Looking back makes you competitive. And, age is not a competitive issue.”

He exhaled and lowered his eyes, as if to watch his breath scatter into the air.

“The truth is, part of me is every age. I’m a three-year-old, I’m a five-year-old, I’m a thirty-seven-year-old, I’m a fifty-year-old. I’ve been through all of them, and I know what it’s like. I delight in being a child when it’s appropriate to be a child. I delight in being a wise old man when it’s appropriate to be a wise old man. Think of all I can be! I am every age, up to my own. Do you understand?”

I nodded.

“How can I be envious of where you are—when I’ve been there myself?”

Author’s Tone

Morrie’s Lesson


Question e

Question E

  • The author’s tone changes from one attitude at the beginning of the excerpt to another attitude by the end. Explain his attitudes.

  • Secondly, summarize Morrie’s advice.


Teachers only

Now you know what you are supposed to write about and you understand the excerpt. Let’s take a look at how you should write your essay.


Teachers only

Notice that the same concepts are rated from one column to the next. There are several different concepts that are being graded.


Teachers only

Question F:

Reread your essay. Please write a one sentence explanation of how you think you did in each category. You should have a 6 sentence response to this question. Explain why in your answers.


Teachers only

Question F:

Reread your essay. Please write a one sentence explanation of how you think you did in each category. You should have a 6 sentence response to this question. Explain why in your answers.

Start with grasp of text…did you get a 4, 3, 2, 1? Why?


Teachers only

Question F:

Reread your essay. Please write a one sentence explanation of how you think you did in each category. You should have a 6 sentence response to this question. Explain why in your answers. Start with thesis

…then make your way to details

… and so on


Anchor papers

ANCHOR PAPERS

  • The upcoming slides are actual student essays. An example of a 4, 3, 2, and 1 will be shown.

  • The point of showing these essays is to help everyone understand further what elements are good to include and not good to include in an essay.

  • As we read through these essays, compare them to your own and respond to the following:

    • Question G: What did you learn from each of the students essays? Please include at least one sentence for each of the essays. You should have a minimum four sentence response.

      • At the end of each anchor paper you will be reminded to answer this question.


Teachers only

4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

In my life, similar to the author, I feel very much affected by what my society thinks of aging. From aging, I am expected to be more responsible and to become prepared for my future, which involves preparation for my future college and career. Like what Morrie said, once “[I’ve] found meaning in [my] life, [I] [won’t] wan’t to go back.” I earnestly believe that I found meaning in

(cont.)


Teachers only

4

(cont.)

my life, enough to set aside all the difficulties and conflicts that come with youth, so that I “can’t wait until [I am] sixty-five”. By accepting what age I am, and not become so negative with the troubles of my present age, I can live my life in a more fulfilling way.

After the author talks to Morrie, he comes from a depressed into a more hopeful and optimistic view of aging. By embracing age and becoming more aware of what benefits aging can bring, it is possible to see how aging is not as abstruse and conflicting as it may seem to be.


This is why it is a 4

Thoughtful, comprehensive grasp of text

This is why it is a 4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

(cont.)


This is why it is a 41

Thoughtful, comprehensive grasp of text

This is why it is a 4

In my life, similar to the author, I feel very much affected by what my society thinks of aging. From aging, I am expected to be more responsible and to become prepared for my future, which involves preparation for my future college and career. Like what Morrie said, once “[I’ve] found meaning in [my] life, [I] [won’t] wan’t to go back.” I earnestly believe that I found meaning in

my life, enough to set aside all the difficulties and conflicts that come with youth, so that I “can’t wait until [I am] sixty-five”. By accepting what age I am, and not become so negative with the troubles of my present age, I can live my life in a more fulfilling way.

After the author talks to Morrie, he comes from a depressed into a more hopeful and optimistic view of aging. By embracing age and becoming more aware of what benefits aging can bring, it is possible to see how aging is not as abstruse and conflicting as it may seem to be.

(cont.)


This is why it is a 42

This is why it is a 4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

(cont.)

Accurately provides specific textual details


This is why it is a 43

This is why it is a 4

In my life, similar to the author, I feel very much affected by what my society thinks of aging. From aging, I am expected to be more responsible and to become prepared for my future, which involves preparation for my future college and career. Like what Morrie said, once “[I’ve] found meaning in [my] life, [I] [won’t] wan’t to go back.” I earnestly believe that I found meaning in

my life, enough to set aside all the difficulties and conflicts that come with youth, so that I “can’t wait until [I am] sixty-five”. By accepting what age I am, and not become so negative with the troubles of my present age, I can live my life in a more fulfilling way.

After the author talks to Morrie, he comes from a depressed into a more hopeful and optimistic view of aging. By embracing age and becoming more aware of what benefits aging can bring, it is possible to see how aging is not as abstruse and conflicting as it may seem to be.

(cont.)

Accurately provides specific textual details


This is why it is a 44

This is why it is a 4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

(cont.)

Demonstrates clear understanding of ambiguities, nuances, complexity of text


This is why it is a 45

This is why it is a 4

In my life, similar to the author, I feel very much affected by what my society thinks of aging. From aging, I am expected to be more responsible and to become prepared for my future, which involves preparation for my future college and career. Like what Morrie said, once “[I’ve] found meaning in [my] life, [I] [won’t] wan’t to go back.” I earnestly believe that I found meaning in

my life, enough to set aside all the difficulties and conflicts that come with youth, so that I “can’t wait until [I am] sixty-five”. By accepting what age I am, and not become so negative with the troubles of my present age, I can live my life in a more fulfilling way.

After the author talks to Morrie, he comes from a depressed into a more hopeful and optimistic view of aging. By embracing age and becoming more aware of what benefits aging can bring, it is possible to see how aging is not as abstruse and conflicting as it may seem to be.

(cont.)

Demonstrates clear understanding of ambiguities, nuances, complexity of text


This is why it is a 46

This is why it is a 4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

(cont.)

Clear awareness of literary devices


This is why it is a 47

This is why it is a 4

In my life, similar to the author, I feel very much affected by what my society thinks of aging. From aging, I am expected to be more responsible and to become prepared for my future, which involves preparation for my future college and career. Like what Morrie said, once “[I’ve] found meaning in [my] life, [I] [won’t] wan’t to go back.” I earnestly believe that I found meaning in

my life, enough to set aside all the difficulties and conflicts that come with youth, so that I “can’t wait until [I am] sixty-five”. By accepting what age I am, and not become so negative with the troubles of my present age, I can live my life in a more fulfilling way.

After the author talks to Morrie, he comes from a depressed into a more hopeful and optimistic view of aging. By embracing age and becoming more aware of what benefits aging can bring, it is possible to see how aging is not as abstruse and conflicting as it may seem to be.

(cont.)

Clear awareness of literary devices


This is why it is a 48

This is why it is a 4

As a person starts growing older and older, there are certain misgivings that may pass a person’s mind. The selection from Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn demonstrates the change of the author after conversing with Morrie on the theme of aging, and how this can be applied on my own life as I begin to grow older.

At first, the author feels very despairing of the concept of aging. He admits that his fear of aging is just one of his fears that is on his “what’s-bugging-[his] generation list”. He tells Morrie that “he was already feeling over the hill”, and the author is very much depressed about his age and the consequences that he feels will happen once he grows old. The author keenly feels the social norms of his society about aging because he worries about the many ways that he tries to do in even order to stay younger.

However, the author starts thinking about age differently after hearing Morrie talk about “aging in better prespective.” Rather than worrying about the material parts of life, Morrie thinks on a more philosophical point of view, and scorns how the youth worry about materialism, and does not seem to envy the downsides of youth. Morrie insists that “aging is not decay”, but the growth of knowledge, added on year after year. The youth have “very little understanding about life” due to their inexperience as well. Morrie points out to the author that although older people do envy the youth, but the old can accept who they are. After all, the old has gone through the age of youth, so the youth ought to be envious old, not the other way around.

(cont.)

Question G (cont.):

How can this essay

help you to write a

better essay?


Teachers only

3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

Those who read Tuesdays with Morrie can also benefit from Morrie’s advice on growing older. His positive and somewhat enthusiastic way of describing the positive outlook on life can raise self-esteem. For example, when he explains that growing older gives people more knowledge and understanding of life can help the reader feel confident about leading a better life. He also can help readers realize that listening to others telling you certain “jeans will make you look skinny” shows ignorance and those complaining about their lives are unsatisfied.

(cont.)


Teachers only

3

(cont)

Not only Albom can say he benefits from this advise, because readers can as well. Although Albom questioned Morries ways at first, but soon, he comprehended Morries outlook on life and grew positive about aging. Readers can as well when they read Morrie’s amazing view on growing old.


This is why it is a 3

Comprehensive grasp of text

This is why it is a 3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

(cont.)


This is why it is a 31

Comprehensive grasp of text

This is why it is a 3

(cont.)

Those who read Tuesdays with Morrie can also benefit from Morrie’s advice on growing older. His positive and somewhat enthusiastic way of describing the positive outlook on life can raise self-esteem. For example, when he explains that growing older gives people more knowledge and understanding of life can help the reader feel confident about leading a better life. He also can help readers realize that listening to others telling you certain “jeans will make you look skinny” shows ignorance and those complaining about their lives are unsatisfied.

Not only Albom can say he benefits from this advise, because readers can as well. Although Albom questioned Morries ways at first, but soon, he comprehended Morries outlook on life and grew positive about aging. Readers can as well when they read Morrie’s amazing view on growing old.


This is why it is a 32

This is why it is a 3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

(cont.)

General textual details


This is why it is a 33

This is why it is a 3

(cont.)

Those who read Tuesdays with Morrie can also benefit from Morrie’s advice on growing older. His positive and somewhat enthusiastic way of describing the positive outlook on life can raise self-esteem. For example, when he explains that growing older gives people more knowledge and understanding of life can help the reader feel confident about leading a better life. He also can help readers realize that listening to others telling you certain “jeans will make you look skinny” shows ignorance and those complaining about their lives are unsatisfied.

Not only Albom can say he benefits from this advise, because readers can as well. Although Albom questioned Morries ways at first, but soon, he comprehended Morries outlook on life and grew positive about aging. Readers can as well when they read Morrie’s amazing view on growing old.

General textual details


This is why it is a 34

This is why it is a 3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

(cont.)

Some convention errors that do not interfere with reader’s understanding


This is why it is a 35

This is why it is a 3

(cont.)

Those who read Tuesdays with Morrie can also benefit from Morrie’s advice on growing older. His positive and somewhat enthusiastic way of describing the positive outlook on life can raise self-esteem. For example, when he explains that growing older gives people more knowledge and understanding of life can help the reader feel confident about leading a better life. He also can help readers realize that listening to others telling you certain “jeans will make you look skinny” shows ignorance and those complaining about their lives are unsatisfied.

Not only Albom can say he benefits from this advise, because readers can as well. Although Albom questioned Morries ways at first, but soon, he comprehended Morries outlook on life and grew positive about aging. Readers can as well when they read Morrie’s amazing view on growing old.

Some convention errors that do not interfere with reader’s understanding


This is why it is a 36

This is why it is a 3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

(cont.)

Some descriptive language


This is why it is a 37

This is why it is a 3

(cont.)

Those who read Tuesdays with Morrie can also benefit from Morrie’s advice on growing older. His positive and somewhat enthusiastic way of describing the positive outlook on life can raise self-esteem. For example, when he explains that growing older gives people more knowledge and understanding of life can help the reader feel confident about leading a better life. He also can help readers realize that listening to others telling you certain “jeans will make you look skinny” shows ignorance and those complaining about their lives are unsatisfied.

Not only Albom can say he benefits from this advise, because readers can as well. Although Albom questioned Morries ways at first, but soon, he comprehended Morries outlook on life and grew positive about aging. Readers can as well when they read Morrie’s amazing view on growing old.

Some descriptive language


This is why it is a 38

This is why it is a 3

In Mitch Albom’s Tuesday with Morrie, Albom and Morrie disscuss the topic of aging and death. Albom sees billboards with young, beautiful people, and did not “see anyone who would pass for over thirty-five”, causing Albom to fret his growing age and death. When he converses this with Morrie, Albom’s tone about growing older changes first by questioning and later is able to understand Morrie’s ways of living. Morrie’s advise can also help those who read his words to live their life as he explains to and allow those worrying about their age to feel better about growing older.

At first, Albom stresses about growing older and talks about aging and death with Morrie, who has a more positive outlook on giving life. Albom seems surprised at his positivity about this questioning Morrie about whether Morrie feared growing old or not or if he envies young people. Morrie admits embracing age, for he becomes wiser, and when he does envy young people, he will “feel it” then “let it go”.

When Albom’s astonishment settles in, he begins to understand why Morrie is as positive as he is, and starts to embrace life as well. After discussing how to simply let go of envy, Albom claims he “felt so much stronger than [Morrie] ridiculously so, as if [he] could lift him and toss him any other way”. This sudden empowerment shows Albom’s understanding to embrace life and comprehension of Morrie’s life values.

(cont.)

Question G (cont.):

How can this essay

help you to write a

better essay?


Teachers only

2

In the story “Tuesdays With Morrie” tells about how its good to age rather then staying young forever because a you get older you learn more. Being the same age gets boring to, so its just better to move on. Its better because moving on you can learn more and see more things.

The Authors Tone changed in a good way. It changed in a good way because they were talking about how you should be proud to be your age. Also Morrie said “you won’t die for a long time”. The authors tone made it sound happy and proud.

Coming from Morrie’s advice its ok to get older and I agree! Getting older means you learn more stuff as we grow. Also it would be boring to be the same age and we wouldn’t act any older when we stay young forever. For me I am proud to be my age and I’m looking forward to moving on, well I am.

In Conclusion about the story “Tuesdays with Morrie” is about a girl names mitch who does not like the age she is at but Morrie gives her advice to make her feel better.


This is why it is a 2

Limited understanding of text

This is why it is a 2

In the story “Tuesdays With Morrie” tells about how its good to age rather then staying young forever because a you get older you learn more. Being the same age gets boring to, so its just better to move on. Its better because moving on you can learn more and see more things.

The Authors Tone changed in a good way. It changed in a good way because they were talking about how you should be proud to be your age. Also Morrie said “you won’t die for a long time”. The authors tone made it sound happy and proud.

Coming from Morrie’s advice its ok to get older and I agree! Getting older means you learn more stuff as we grow. Also it would be boring to be the same age and we wouldn’t act any older when we stay young forever. For me I am proud to be my age and I’m looking forward to moving on, well I am.

In Conclusion about the story “Tuesdays with Morrie” is about a girl names mitch who does not like the age she is at but Morrie gives her advice to make her feel better.


This is why it is a 21

This is why it is a 2

In the story “Tuesdays With Morrie” tells about how its good to age rather then staying young forever because a you get older you learn more. Being the same age gets boring to, so its just better to move on. Its better because moving on you can learn more and see more things.

The Authors Tone changed in a good way. It changed in a good way because they were talking about how you should be proud to be your age. Also Morrie said “you won’t die for a long time”. The authors tone made it sound happy and proud.

Coming from Morrie’s advice its ok to get older and I agree! Getting older means you learn more stuff as we grow. Also it would be boring to be the same age and we wouldn’t act any older when we stay young forever. For me I am proud to be my age and I’m looking forward to moving on, well I am.

In Conclusion about the story “Tuesdays with Morrie” is about a girl names mitch who does not like the age she is at but Morrie gives her advice to make her feel better.

Few textual details


This is why it is a 22

This is why it is a 2

In the story “Tuesdays With Morrie” tells about how its good to age rather then staying young forever because a you get older you learn more. Being the same age gets boring to, so its just better to move on. Its better because moving on you can learn more and see more things.

The Authors Tone changed in a good way. It changed in a good way because they were talking about how you should be proud to be your age. Also Morrie said “you won’t die for a long time”. The authors tone made it sound happy and proud.

Coming from Morrie’s advice its ok to get older and I agree! Getting older means you learn more stuff as we grow. Also it would be boring to be the same age and we wouldn’t act any older when we stay young forever. For me I am proud to be my age and I’m looking forward to moving on, well I am.

In Conclusion about the story “Tuesdays with Morrie” is about a girl names mitch who does not like the age she is at but Morrie gives her advice to make her feel better.

Few sentence types


This is why it is a 23

This is why it is a 2

In the story “Tuesdays With Morrie” tells about how its good to age rather then staying young forever because a you get older you learn more. Being the same age gets boring to, so its just better to move on. Its better because moving on you can learn more and see more things.

The Authors Tone changed in a good way. It changed in a good way because they were talking about how you should be proud to be your age. Also Morrie said “you won’t die for a long time”. The authors tone made it sound happy and proud.

Coming from Morrie’s advice its ok to get older and I agree! Getting older means you learn more stuff as we grow. Also it would be boring to be the same age and we wouldn’t act any older when we stay young forever. For me I am proud to be my age and I’m looking forward to moving on, well I am.

In Conclusion about the story “Tuesdays with Morrie” is about a girl names mitch who does not like the age she is at but Morrie gives her advice to make her feel better.

(cont.)

Question G (cont.):

How can this essay

help you to write a

better essay?


Teachers only

1

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Iv’e Read bout how this lady goes to an airport and see’s all these good looking people and there all young and she say’s to herself that she want’s to look good just like them but she can’t because she said sh’s to old. Then Mitch tells the lady that your age doesn’t matter because she always here’s people always’s say that they wish that they weren’t the age that they are because they don’t like there age. And why complain about your age, It’s never gonna achieve nothing an age is a age so just keep it the way it is. So what this story is trying to tell us is that when you complain it’s never gonna accomplish anything, so just deal with whatever you were born with like in the story said if you buy a pear of jeans it will make you look better, and that’s not true you choose what you want to were and how you look. But although never look at anybody else and compare them with your self.


This is why it is a 1

Minimal grasp of text

This is why it is a 1

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Iv’e Read bout how this lady goes to an airport and see’s all these good looking people and there all young and she say’s to herself that she want’s to look good just like them but she can’t because she said sh’s to old. Then Mitch tells the lady that your age doesn’t matter because she always here’s people always’s say that they wish that they weren’t the age that they are because they don’t like there age. And why complain about your age, It’s never gonna achieve nothing an age is a age so just keep it the way it is. So what this story is trying to tell us is that when you complain it’s never gonna accomplish anything, so just deal with whatever you were born with like in the story said if you buy a pear of jeans it will make you look better, and that’s not true you choose what you want to were and how you look. But although never look at anybody else and compare them with your self.


This is why it is a 11

This is why it is a 1

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Iv’e Read bout how this lady goes to an airport and see’s all these good looking people and there all young and she say’s to herself that she want’s to look good just like them but she can’t because she said sh’s to old. Then Mitch tells the lady that your age doesn’t matter because she always here’s people always’s say that they wish that they weren’t the age that they are because they don’t like there age. And why complain about your age, It’s never gonna achieve nothing an age is a age so just keep it the way it is. So what this story is trying to tell us is that when you complain it’s never gonna accomplish anything, so just deal with whatever you were born with like in the story said if you buy a pear of jeans it will make you look better, and that’s not true you choose what you want to were and how you look. But although never look at anybody else and compare them with your self.

Serious convention errors that do impede reader’s understanding


This is why it is a 12

This is why it is a 1

Based on the selection from Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Iv’e Read bout how this lady goes to an airport and see’s all these good looking people and there all young and she say’s to herself that she want’s to look good just like them but she can’t because she said sh’s to old. Then Mitch tells the lady that your age doesn’t matter because she always here’s people always’s say that they wish that they weren’t the age that they are because they don’t like there age. And why complain about your age, It’s never gonna achieve nothing an age is a age so just keep it the way it is. So what this story is trying to tell us is that when you complain it’s never gonna accomplish anything, so just deal with whatever you were born with like in the story said if you buy a pear of jeans it will make you look better, and that’s not true you choose what you want to were and how you look. But although never look at anybody else and compare them with your self.

Question G (cont.):

How can this essay

help you to write a

better essay?


Almost done

Almost done…

  • On your paper you should have answered questions A-G.

  • Last assignment:

    • Go rewrite your essay, but this time make it a four! You can do it:

      • You understand the writing task

      • You understand what a great essay must have.

  • Please turn in questions A-G stapled behind your rewritten essay.


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