Multiple choice types
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Multiple Choice Types. They don’t just pull them from mid-air! There is a method to the madness . . 10 Types…. The multiple choice section of the AP Lit test consists of questions about poetry and prose. These questions can be divided into 10 categories.

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Multiple Choice Types

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Multiple choice types

Multiple Choice Types

They don’t just pull them from mid-air!

There is a method to the madness.


10 types

10 Types…

  • The multiple choice section of the AP Lit test consists of questions about poetry and prose.

  • These questions can be divided into 10 categories.

  • Decode the question type and you are on your way to correctly answering the question.


Diction

Diction

  • Deals with:

    • Usage

    • Articulation

    • Wording

    • Phrasing


Diction1

Diction

  • The word “seething” (line 33) provides an example of

  • The author’s choice of words in the first paragraph can best be described as

  • In a connotative sense, the adjective “graying” (line 39) refers to

  • The shift in diction between the first two paragraphs and the final paragraph can best be described as


Multiple choice types

Tone

  • Deals with:

    • Atmosphere

    • Feel

    • Ambiance

    • Climate

    • Mood


Multiple choice types

Tone

  • In lines 39-47 the tone can best be described as

  • With the words “The eye turned . . . in the night before her” (lines 40-47), the speaker’s attitude shifts from

  • The tone of the passage as a whole shifts from


Inference

Inference

  • Deals with:

    • Suggestion

    • Deduction

    • Assumption

    • Implications


Inference1

Inference

  • The reader can infer that the boy is concerned about nature by the way he

  • It may be inferred from the first paragraph that in the near future the boy will

  • The words “where she ran the cries of the coyotes clapped shut as if a door had closed upon them and all was fear and marvel”

    (lines 52-54) imply that

  • It may be inferred from the passage beginning with “He got the fire” (line 15) to the words “burning scrim” (line 21) that the main

    character


Vocabulary in context

Vocabulary in context

  • Deals with:

    • Context clues

    • Time period

    • Connoatation


Vocabulary in context1

Vocabulary in Context

  • The word “groundvole” (line 48) refers to a [scrim, line 21; “origin,” line 13; “penitent,” (line 32)]

  • The connotation of the word “celebrants” (line 22) can best be interpreted to mean that one is


Syntax

Syntax

  • Deals with:

    • Grammar

    • Sentence Structure

    • Language rules


Syntax1

Syntax

  • The words “The eye turned to the first gave back no light and he closed it with his thumb and sat by her and put his hand upon her bloodied forehead and closed his own eyes that he could see her running . . .” (lines 40-44) serve to show

  • The author’s purpose in using a compound-complex sentence (lines 15-24) is to

  • The type of subordinate clause used in lines 55-56 is

  • When the syntax changes from short to longer sentences, this dichotomy in sentence structure best serves to


Main idea purpose

Main Idea/Purpose

  • Deals with:

    • Reason

    • Rationale

    • Function

    • Intention

    • Objective

    • Goal


Main idea purpose1

Main Idea/Purpose

  • The purpose of boy’s envisioning the wolf running in the mountains (lines 40-53) is to

  • The boy builds the fire mainly to

  • The author’s main purpose in the first paragraph is to

  • The primary purpose of the passage is to


Function

Function

  • Deals with:

    • Role

    • Task

    • Operation


Function1

Function

  • The function of the lines “graying faintly in the east” (lines 38-39) is to show that the

  • The function of the long sentence in lines 15-24 is to reveal the boy’s

  • The words “above him where their cries seemed to have no origin other than the night itself” (lines 13-14) serve to

  • The words “the sun’s coming as yet had not undone the rich matrix of creatures passed in the night before her” serve to

  • The words “The eye turned to the fire gave back no light and he closed it” (lines 40-41) primarily serve to


Grammar

Grammar

  • Deals with:

    • Clauses/Phrases

    • General Grammatical Rules


Grammar1

Grammar

  • The words “He looked for the horse” (lines 35-36) is an example of a/an[clause—phrase]

  • The words “where it steamed in the firelight like a burning scrim” (lines 20-21) provide an example of a

  • The word “it” (line 17) refers to the

  • The first paragraph of the passage is mainly characterized by


Figures of speech

Figures of Speech

  • Deals with:

    • Metaphors

    • Similes

    • Various figures of speech elements you looked at in junior year.


Figures of speech1

Figures of Speech

  • The words “with his hands up before him like some dozing penitent” (lines 31-32) is an example of

  • The words “it streamed in the firelight like a burning scrim standing in a wilderness” (lines 20-22) contain examples of

  • In the words “where she ran the cries of the coyotes clapped shut as if a door had closed upon them” (lines 51-52), the speaker

    employs all of the following except

  • The simile “it steamed in the firelight like a burning scrim” (lines 20-21) serves to


Point of view

Point of View

  • Deals with:

    • Standpoint

    • Position

    • Approach

    • Judgement


Point of view1

Point of View

  • The point of view of the passage is

  • The narrator’s perspective in the passage as a whole is that of

  • The point of view in the passage as a whole shifts from the objective nonparticipant to the


In your groups

In your groups….

  • Create a multiple choice question for each section, using The Crossing.

  • Remember, questions should be complex and specific.

  • Answer choices should not be obviously wrong or right. A through E.

  • Type up your questions tonight on PowerPoint and be prepared to quiz the class tomorrow. If you can’t prepare a PowerPoint, then have enough copies on paper for everyone to have their own.


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