Advanced google instruction as a tool for promoting evidence based practice
Download
1 / 26

Advanced Google Instruction as a Tool for Promoting Evidence-Based Practice - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 129 Views
  • Uploaded on

Advanced Google Instruction as a Tool for Promoting Evidence-Based Practice. By Jeff Mason, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region Shauna-Lee Konrad, London Health Sciences Centre. RQHR’s Google Initiative: Advanced Google for Dummies. Motivation Low interest for traditional library classes

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Advanced Google Instruction as a Tool for Promoting Evidence-Based Practice' - jory


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Advanced google instruction as a tool for promoting evidence based practice l.jpg

Advanced Google Instruction as a Tool for Promoting Evidence-Based Practice

By Jeff Mason, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region

Shauna-Lee Konrad, London Health Sciences Centre


Rqhr s google initiative advanced google for dummies l.jpg
RQHR’s Google Initiative: Evidence-Based PracticeAdvanced Google for Dummies

Motivation

  • Low interest for traditional library classes

  • Desire to try something new and different for the summer as part of co-op student’s placement

    Rationale

  • Health care practitioners’ use of Google is inevitable

  • Proper training is necessary to achieve evidence-based results


Literature review l.jpg
Literature Review Evidence-Based Practice

  • Many advocate the use of Google as a tool for information literacy

  • Few actual experiences are published

  • Three case studies - Google as a tool for information literacy


Case study virginia commonwealth university l.jpg
Case Study: Evidence-Based PracticeVirginia Commonwealth University

  • 1.5 credit hours honours module for undergraduate students

    Content

  • Google as a tool for information literacy

  • Overview of Google & search techniques

    Conclusions

  • Positive experience

  • Promote library’s education & outreach services

  • Foster on-going dialogue about information retrieval, organization and evaluation


Case study the google game l.jpg
Case Study - Evidence-Based PracticeThe Google Game

  • Grade 9 English class

  • Developed game to teach students to refine web searches

  • Pre-teaching session followed by Google game

    Game

  • Assigned search question

  • Winner correctly answers question with least results

    Conclusions

  • Student recognition of decreased search time

  • Student opinion about searching improved

  • Increased credibility for librarians


Case study become a google power user l.jpg
Case Study - Evidence-Based PracticeBecome a Google Power User

  • Various Grade 10 English classes

  • To teach students to be better Internet Searchers by using 15 power searches in Google

    Method

    Pretest > Instruction > Practice Assignments > Post test

    Conclusions

  • Significant improvements in students’ searching habits

  • Increased students’ confidence and interest in searching

  • Students’ increased knowledge of relevancy, credibility, web terminology


Rqhr course development l.jpg
RQHR Course Development Evidence-Based Practice

Overall Goal

  • Teach Google features that will be useful for finding information to promote evidence-based practice

General Google Information

  • How Google works

  • Scope of Google

  • Google for health information

    Google Special Features

  • Calculator, Translator, I’m Feeling Lucky, Related Pages, Google Images, Google Scholar

    Google Search Techniques


Google search techniques l.jpg
Google Search Techniques Evidence-Based Practice


Rqhr teaching process l.jpg
RQHR Teaching Process Evidence-Based Practice

  • Weekly Drop-in Sessions in July & August

  • Computer Lab (8 seats)

  • Live demonstration

  • Explanations with health examples

  • Practice time

  • Handout


Marketing process l.jpg
Marketing Process Evidence-Based Practice

  • Promotional Posters

  • Health Region Weekly Newsletter

  • Health Region Intranet Page

  • Library Intranet Page

  • Health Region-wide email


Initial response l.jpg
Initial Response Evidence-Based Practice

  • First class: Minimal attendance

  • Subsequent classes well attended

  • Introduced survey after 2nd class

  • Very positive to all sessions

  • Increased interest in library

  • Promotes discussion about credibility of web information

  • Departmental requests for class


Survey design l.jpg
Survey Design Evidence-Based Practice

  • Consulted with health region research office

  • Developed 10 question survey

  • Purpose of Survey

    • To learn why staff use Google

    • To evaluate success of course


Results 1 l.jpg
Results - 1 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Who attended?

    • 188 usable responses

    • 5 groups

      • Health care providers

      • Health administrators

      • Allied health care providers

      • Educators/researchers (includes students)

      • Other


Slide14 l.jpg

Results – 2 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Only 1 physician attended surveyed classes

  • Allied HCP – primarily pharmacists and dieticians


Results 3 l.jpg

Current use of Google Evidence-Based Practice

>50% ALWAYS use Google as their search engine.

Results - 3


Results 4 l.jpg
Results - 4 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Use of Google for work information


Results 5 l.jpg
Results - 5 Evidence-Based Practice

  • What Users Like About Google

    • 28% - User friendly

    • 24% - Fast

    • 17% - Scope


Results 6 l.jpg
Results - 6 Evidence-Based Practice

  • What Users Do Not Like About Google


Results 7 l.jpg
Results - 7 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Where else do users find information?

    1 – Google

    2 – Subscription databases

    3 – Free databases

    4 – Other search engines

    5 – Library staff


Results 8 l.jpg
Results - 8 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Why users attended session

    • 42% - learn to search better/save time

    • 30% - just want to learn

  • Was the session useful?

    • 57% - extremely useful

    • 8% - not useful


Results 9 l.jpg
Results - 9 Evidence-Based Practice

  • What users liked about the session

    • 22% - tips and tricks

    • 9% each – practical/hands on

  • Do users want to learn more?

    • 58% - yes!


Discussion 1 l.jpg
Discussion - 1 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Survey supports original ideas:

    • Google is being used heavily

      • Is being used for health care decisions

    • Staff do not use it effectively

    • There is a need to provide this type of education


Conclusion 1 l.jpg
Conclusion - 1 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Providing staff with a session they want/need:

    • Allows library to promote EBP by explaining strengths and weaknesses of Google/Internet sources.

    • Raises library profile, reaches non-traditional users

    • Increases credibility of librarians


Conclusion 2 l.jpg
Conclusion - 2 Evidence-Based Practice

  • Future Directions

    • Sessions that compare Google results to proprietary database results.

    • Sessions that use health care literature search examples in Google.


Thank you l.jpg
Thank You Evidence-Based Practice

  • Mary Chipanshi and Susan Powelson, RQHR Health Sciences Library

  • Ali Bell and Nicole Aitken, RQHR Research and Performance Support


Contact information l.jpg
Contact Information Evidence-Based Practice

  • For more information please contact:

    • Jeff Mason, Client Services Librarian, RQHR – jeff.mason@rqhealth.ca

    • Shauna-Lee Konrad, Reference Librarian, LHSC - shauna.konrad@lhsc.on.ca