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THE LITERACY TEST Test Day. Thursday April 11 th , 2013 BE AT SCHOOL BY 8:30 AM 8:45-10:15 Booklet # 1 (75 minutes) 10:15-10:30 Nutritional Break 10:30-11:50 Booklet # 2 (75 minutes) 11:50-12:00 Questionnaire (10 minutes) CERTAIN STUDENTS GET DOUBLE TIME.

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The literacy test test day

THE LITERACY TESTTest Day

Thursday April 11th, 2013

BE AT SCHOOL BY 8:30 AM

8:45-10:15 Booklet # 1 (75 minutes)

10:15-10:30 Nutritional Break

10:30-11:50 Booklet # 2 (75 minutes)

11:50-12:00 Questionnaire (10 minutes)

CERTAIN STUDENTS GET DOUBLE TIME.

Once you begin the test, teachers cannot answer any questions you may have.


The literacy test test day

LITERACY TEST

Types of Questions

  • There are three types of writing questions on the OSSLT:

  • Long-writing tasks

  • Short-writing tasks

  • and Multiple-choice questions.

Based on a PowerPoint Developed by Thomas A. Stewart High School.

Long Writing tasks

  • There are two Long-writing tasks:

  • The news report, and

  • “a series of paragraphs expressing an opinion.” (it's an essay.)

The following are examples of actual OSSLT questions from past tests. We’re just going to give you an idea of what they look like in this guide.

There is a specific guide for each kind of question that goes in to much more detail. Links to all the other guides are at the back of this presentation.


The literacy test test day

Writing Questions

This is an example of a Short Writing Task

The difference between this and the Open Response Readingquestions is there is nothing to read first.

The next big difference, is the way that it’s marked.

Short Writing Tasks are marked the same way as Long Writing Tasks – for both Topic Development [60] and Conventions[40] – just on a smaller scale. Instead of 60/40 for 100 points they are marked as 30/20 for 50 points.

Section III: Writing

Short Writing Task (Answer in full and correctly written sentences.)

What would be the ideal job for you? Use specific details to explain your choice.

Rough Notes

Use the space below for rough notes. Nothing you write in this space will be scored.

1


The literacy test test day

Writing Questions

Scoring: Topic Development

There are three (3) ways to get a zero (0)


The literacy test test day

Writing Questions

Scoring: Topic Development

There are three (3) ways to get a zero (0)


The literacy test test day

Writing Questions

Scoring: Topic Development

There are three (3) ways to get a zero (0)

OK. Next, we’ll show you some examples of Short Writing task answers taken from past tests.

We’ll start with the ones that weren’t that good so you can learn what NOT to do.


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 10

All this answer does is name a job. (and who wouldn't want that job?)

But it does not explain why it “would be ideal for them.”One sentence is not going to get it done.


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 20

This one is a little better because it names two possible jobs (work either at a resturant or a clothing store). But the explanation isn't clear enough.(helps people, interesting, always learning new skills). They’re asking the reader to figure out the connection between the reasons and the jobs. Those reasons could apply to any job so they don’t help all that much.


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 30

This is what you should be aiming for!

This response identifies a job (social worker)and then gives personal details and reasons that relate to being a social worker. (I come from a country where abuse is really high, and I've seen people getting hurt physically and mentally; a job where I can help people feel better)


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 30

One of the best things about this response is that it's personal and sounds authentic. The student knows something about what they’re talking about.

You are much better off showing you are smart. For example, say you want to be a plumber because that’s the family business, or because you like to work with your hands and it pays well, rather than saying “I want to be a billionaire!" (that's so freaking bad.)


The literacy test test day

The second way Short Writing task answers are marked (scored)is

Writing Conventions

Writing Conventions!!?

OMG, WT…H are “Writing Conventions”?

Chill. Basically they’re talking about spelling, grammar, sentence structure and things like that.


The literacy test test day

Writing Conventions

Unlike the News Report or the Series of Paragraphs, which are marked out of 40 for Writing Conventions, these are marked out of 20.

This comes down to either you did it or you didn't do it….so do it!


The literacy test test day

A Code 10 means that there are too many mistakes to follow what you’re trying to say. The reader can't understand you.

If you get a Code 20, it means that there are not too many mistakes, and the reader can follow what you are saying. That's good!


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 10

CODE 10 MEANS A FAIL!

?

This is a Code 10 because there are too many mistakes in it. There are errors in: sentence structure, punctuation, usage, and spelling .(Run-on sentence at beginning, missing question mark and periods, “a” for “I”, “thinks” for “things”, “by” for “be”). Also, the last sentence doesn't make sense.


The literacy test test day

This is a

Code 20

Not a

FAIL.

This is a Code 20 because, even though there are a couple of mistakes in it , like spelling(absolutly, when ever)),pronoun agreement (child, they), and the run-on sentence over the last four lines (!), the mistakes don’t get in the way of understanding the answer.


The literacy test test day

Marc Garneau C.I.

Come to the After-School Literacy Classes Monday to Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in Room 217

The Slide Show is available from the Student Pick Up folder entitled LITERACY TEST INFO.


Writing news report

A News Report is one of the two major (Long) writing tasks you will see on the OSSLT.

It is marked out of 100; 60 for “Topic Development” and 40 for “Writing Conventions.”

This makes it one of the two most important questions in the OSSLT.

Do well on the Long writing tasks; this and the “Series of Paragraphs,” and you’re well on your way to passing the test.

An example of a News Report question and what good and bad answers look like follows. There are a couple of basic things to keep in mind:

Writing: News Report

Overview

1: Follow the proper format.

2: Don’t leave space blank.


The literacy test test day

Task: Write a news report on the next page based on the headline and picture below.• You will have to make up the facts and information to answer some or all of the following questions: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How?• You must relate your newspaper report to both the headline and the picture.Purpose and Audience: to report on an event for the readers of a newspaperLength: The lined space provided for your written work indicates the approximate length of the writing expected.

Car wash a success

The Headline tells you what the story should be about.

In this case the answer has to be a story about a Car washwhich is a success.

Newspaper Reports are always based on answering the Questions: Who, What, Where, When, WhyandHow?

The Photo puts the story in context. It gives you clues about Who the story should be about and perhaps Why and How.


Elements of a news report

Task: Write a news report on the next page based on the headline and picture below.• You will have to make up the facts and information to answer some or all of the following questions: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How?• You must relate your newspaper report to both the headline and the picture.Purpose and Audience: to report on an event for the readers of a newspaperLength: The lined space provided for your written work indicates the approximate length of the writing expected.

Elements of a News Report

  • A news story has to contain what everyone calls the “5 W’s”…which really means:

    • Who is the story about?

    • Whathappened?

    • Wheredid it happen?

    • Whydid it happen and/or Why does it matter?

    • Whendid it happen?

    • AndHow did it happen?


The literacy test test day

Who

What

When

Where

This is an example of a good News Report Answer:

You can see Who, What, When, Where, WhyandHowall right at the beginning of the report.

Why

How


How to write a news report

How to Write a News Report

A news report must be written in the Third Person.

That means you CAN NOT USE “I, me, mine, our, we” in it.

It’s not “My school won a computing contest last week”

It has to be: “A grade 11 class at Marc Garneau Collegiate won the Toronto Spelling Bee Contest last week.”

If you want to include an opinion, you have to quote someone in the story.

So, it’s not: We were really proud because we put a lot of work into it.

It’s: "Students in the class were “very proud,” said student Sayed Hamsa. “We put a lot if work into this, so we’re really glad we won,” Hamsa said.


Risc it the more you do the more the reward

RISC IT – the more you do, the more the reward.

R

I

S

C

I

T

elate your story to the picture and the headline.

indent paragraphs (lots of them).

pelling and grammar – matter. Check them.

ontains 2 quotations (at least) to support the story.

nteresting - it won’t be if you’re not trying to make it so.

ell nothing but the facts, leave out your opinion.


Writing news report scoring

Writing: News Report: Scoring:

The News Report is “scored” – marked out of 100.

60 for Topic Development

Topic Development is basically what you write. Is it a proper News Report? Does it relate clearly to the headline and the photograph? Did you put enough specific detail in? Did you quote people to provide support?

40 for Writing Conventions

Writing conventions are basically how you write. Spelling, sentence structure, punctuation and grammar.

The News Report is “scored” – marked out of 100.

60 for Topic Development

40 for Writing Conventions

Topic Development

Writing Conventions


Writing news report scoring topic development

Writing: News Report: Scoring: Topic Development

There are three (3) ways to get a zero (0)


The literacy test test day

This is a Fail

Code 10,

.

  • The story is about a car wash - or one car that got washed

  • but it’s not a News Report.

  • It’s just a story.

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

Basically what they’ve done is throw Who, What, Where, Why, When and How down like a shopping list without trying to really make sense of them.

They got the first part: The response is a news report related to the headline and photo, but the focus is unclear. There aren’t enough supporting details and there’s very little organization..

Here’s a Code 20, which is also a fail

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

  • Here’s a Code 30, which is getting closer to what we want.

  • The report has a clear focus on an event (car wash foundraiser).

  • But there aren't enough supporting details and the few they have are not clear. (enough money, going to almost every neighbourhood, successful car wash foundraiser).

  • What’s good is there is some evidence of organization: the two main ideas–enough money and 1.5 million dollar – are linked.

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

This is a Code 40 which is definitely a pass.

This is the minimum you should be shooting for.

What’s good is: There’s a clear connection to the headline and photo with a clear and consistent focus on an event (carwash).

There’s enough supporting detail. Some of it is specific (St. John’s elementary school, June 29th 2009, 2000$, 45 kids), which is good.

Some is a little vague (local charity, What local charity?)

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

News reports are supposed to have lots of small paragraphs

Notice they use paragraphs to organize their ideas

The quotation here is good. It would be perfect if they gave the Principal a name.

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

This is a Code 50

A very solid job with only a couple of things missing.

  • Even better:

  • There are Quotations from two different people to support the story.

  • The organization is logical with lots of paragraphs.

  • The final paragraph mentions the school’s trip to Ottawa again and provides a neat conclusion.

This news report is clearly related to the headline and photo with a clear and consistent focus on an event (carwash WHAT …trip to Ottawa WHY). There are enough specific supporting details (Saturday, May 5 WHEN, Highview Public School WHO, Ottawa, 8 am to 4 pm, student name).

1

2

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

This is a Code 60

It’s the best score you can get.

This report is clearly related to the headline and photo with a clear and consistent focus on an event.

It’s got WHO,WHAT , WHERE, WHY and WHEN right up front. Then, lots of detail on HOW, backed up with quotations from different people involved.

Extra! Extra!

They threw in a sub-head

(a second smaller headline that gives more detail)

and a cutline

(a caption that explains what’s in the photo).

Real Newspaper stories usually have both of these elements. It’s never a bad idea to include them.

10

40

20

50

30

60


The literacy test test day

1

This is good for a lot of reasons.

- It has lots of specific details (e.g., names of the city, students, a parent; Haiti, Canadian Red Cross, drivers couldn't resist a good car cleaning, not only helped people in their community, but people hundreds of kilometres away).

- AND - Quotations from two perspectives.

- The Organization easy to follow. The opening lead connects effectively to the closing sentence.

2

10

10

40

40

20

20

50

50

30

30

60

60


Scoring guide for long writing conventions

This is the second way answers are marked (scored)

Writing Conventions

Scoring Guide for Long Writing Conventions

Writing Conventions?

What are “Writing Conventions”?

Chill. Basically they’re talking about spelling, grammar, sentence structure and things like that.

10

30

20

40


The literacy test test day

Errors in conventions interfere with communication (e.g., spelling: vearis, braek, lik, there, cleen, besid, grach, saide, movie’s, dird, smils, mitearials, vires;

lack of punctuation at the end of sentences, incorrect use of capital letters The children They washing; omitted words: To be cleen and success).

It’s a fail because there are just too many mistakes

10

30

20

40


Scoring guide for long writing conventions section iv news report question 1

Scoring Guide for Long Writing Conventions Section IV News Report Question 1

A Code 20 isn’t a pass either, although it’s better than a 10 as every mark counts in the end.

Basically, you’re making them work too hard to try to understand your News Story.

“Errors in conventions distract from communication.” means:

You’ve made so many mistakes (spelling, grammar) that it’s hard to follow what you’re trying to say.

10

30

20

40


The literacy test test day

This is a Code 20

It’s a Code 20 because there are so many mistakes you have to work too hard to stay with the story.

There are words missing: all you guys helped you guys; this for a good cause;

A lot of spelling mistakes: coffe, ther, lookin, wher, fun raiser;

Andmissing capitals: metro, april).

?

The first problem is a lack of punctuation at the end of sentences and no capital letters. That makes it read like one big sentence, which is really hard to follow).

?

?

?

V

?

?

10

30

20

40


Scoring guide for long writing conventions section iv news report question 11

Scoring Guide for Long Writing Conventions Section IV News Report Question 1

Code 30 is the minimum you want to get. It’s a pass.

You’re allowed to make some mistakes and still pass as long as those mistaks don’t get in the way of following your story.

You’re allowed to make some mistakes and still pass as long as those mistaks don’t get in the way of following your story.

You’re allowed to make some mistakes and still pass as long as those mistakes don’t get in the way of following your story.

10

30

20

40


The literacy test test day

This is a Code 30

This is the minimum level you want.

A Code 30 is different from a Code 20 in that while there are mistakes, they don’t get in the way of understanding the story

So, there are a few spelling mistakes : reasearch, planing

Some capitals missing: road, local, rexdale;

There are some punctuation mistakes: missing commas in the date and the quotations.

10

30

20

40


Scoring guide for long writing conventions section iv news report question 12

Words. I am your Master.

Scoring Guide for Long Writing Conventions Section IV News Report Question 1

You get a Code 40 when your story follows the News Report format without any significant mistakes and shows you understand the format.

Basically that You own it.

10

30

20

40


The literacy test test day

What makes this a Code 40 is the obvious control the writer has over spelling, grammar and punctuation

This is a Code 40

This is the best score you can get.

So the fact they spelled comittee, and it’s wrong and didn’t put the periods or commas inside the quotations marks doesn’t cost them any marks.

10

30

20

40


The literacy test test day

If you have any questions, please ask your English teacher or make an appointment to see Mr. White.

Come to the After-School Literacy Classes, Monday to Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in Room 217.


Reading multiple choice

The story will

appear a

Paragraph

at a time each

time you click

A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontario’s history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario.

A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such “luxury.” In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher.

After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in 1926. For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults.

The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by 1938. However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements.

In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the car’s last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in 1965. Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

Reading: Multiple Choice


Reading multiple choice1

A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontario’s history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario.

A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such “luxury.” In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher.

After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in 1926. For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults.

The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by 1938. However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements.

In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the car’s last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in 1965. Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

Reading: Multiple Choice


Reading multiple choice2

EXAMPLE:

What kind of question do you think this is?

1

1 Explicit ? –Can you get the answer directly from the text?

Multiple-Choice

(Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.)

Reading: Multiple Choice

In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements

in Northern Ontario had schools, because the

settlements lacked

a roads.

b money.

c children.

d teachers.

3 “Making Conections?” – Are you being asked to take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what you’ve learned?

2 Implicit ? – Do you have to make an inference? Are they asking you to think about what you’ve read and come to a conclusion – put “2 and 2 together?”


Reading multiple choice3

EXAMPLE:

1

Multiple-Choice

(Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.)

Reading: Multiple Choice

In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements

in Northern Ontario had schools, because the

settlements lacked

a roads.

b money.

c children.

d teachers.

In 1920, few mining and forestry settlements

in Northern Ontario had schools, because the

settlements lacked

a roads.

b money.

c children.

d teachers.

A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such “luxury.”

It’s Explicit

We get the answer directly from the text.

The answer is:

b) money


Reading multiple choice4

A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontario’s history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such “luxury.” In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in 1926. For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of

learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by 1938. However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the car’s last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in 1965. Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

Reading: Multiple Choice


Reading multiple choice5

EXAMPLE:

OK, now what kind of question do you think this is?

3

1 Explicit ? –Can you get the answer directly from the text?

Multiple-Choice

(Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.)

Reading: Multiple Choice

Which of the following was not served by a

rail car classroom?

a “forestry settlements” (line 2)

b “few towns” (line 3)

c “remote settlements” (lines 5–6)

d “tiny communities” (line 10)

2 Implicit ? – Do you have to make an inference? Are they asking you to think about what you’ve read and come to a conclusion – put “2 and 2 together?”

3 “Making Conections?” – Are you being asked to take the information from the text and draw a conclusion based on what you’ve learned?


Reading multiple choice6

EXAMPLE:

Again, what kind of question do you think this is?

3

Watch the “not” here. They’ve made it bold to make sure you notice.

Multiple-Choice

(Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.)

Reading: Multiple Choice

Which of the following was not served by a

rail car classroom?

a “forestry settlements” (line 2)

b “few towns” (line 3)

c “remote settlements” (lines 5–6)

d “tiny communities” (line 10)

Which of the following was not served by a

rail car classroom?

a “forestry settlements” (line 2)

b “few towns” (line 3)

c “remote settlements” (lines 5–6)

d “tiny communities” (line 10)

It’s Implicit – You have to make an inference and figure out where the school trains didn’t go.

They didn’t go to the “few towns” that could afford to build real schools.


Reading multiple choice7

Based on a PowerPoint Developed by Thomas A. Stewart High School.

A little-known but interesting example of Northern Ontario’s history is the school on rails. By the 1920s, mining and forestry settlements were scattered along the network of railway lines of Northern Ontario. A few towns had grown large enough to pay for their own schools, but the outposts could not afford such “luxury.” In 1922, a North Bay school superintendent pushed for an experiment to bring schools to these remote settlements by converting passenger rail cars into classrooms. These cars contained desks, blackboards and books and a small apartment for the teacher. After being on display at the Canadian National Exhibition (a major fall fair) in Toronto, the first two cars left for northeastern Ontario in 1926. For four days at a time, the cars rested at railway sidetracks in the tiny communities. Children hiked or came by horse and sled several kilometres for their education, and at night the school car became a place of learning and social activity for adults. The experiment was so successful that seven cars were in operation by 1938. However, during the 1950s extensive highway construction turned many trackside towns into deserted settlements. In 1967, one of the last school cars was shuttled into a Toronto rail yard. But that was not to be its final stop. The people of Clinton, Ontario, purchased the well-worn car to honour their fellow citizen Fred Sloman. Sloman, the car’s last teacher, taught on railway cars from 1926 until his retirement in 1965. Today the restored car tells its story of Northern Ontario life, as a museum in Clinton.

Reading: Multiple Choice

The same sentence has provided two answers…that’s not always going to be the case but, as you see, it could happen.


Reading multiple choice8

EXAMPLE:

4

Multiple-Choice

(Record the best or most correct answer on the Student Answer Sheet.)

Reading: Multiple Choice

What supports the idea that the “experiment”

was a success?

a Children and adults showed up.

b Some towns opened their own schools.

c Highways were built in Northern Ontario.

d A passenger rail car was converted into a

museum.

If you cannot figure out the correct answer, then figure out what you know to be the wrong answer.

This is the only proof that makes sense and comes from the selection. The fact a rail car is now a museum is in the last line of the article.


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