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Check Your Progress 3. A Review of our Skills 5 th Grade Mrs. Williams. Plot. (S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9) We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution). . Fiction.

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Check your progress 3

Check Your Progress 3

A Review of our Skills

5th Grade

Mrs. Williams


Plot

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Fiction
Fiction

  • Most fictional stories are based on these three things:

    • A person or persons (characters)

    • In a place and at a time (setting)

    • With a problem (conflict)

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Characters
Characters

Types of characters in a story are:

  • Protagonist

  • Antagonist

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Exposition
Exposition

  • This is the beginning of the story where they tell you about the characters and setting.

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Conflict
Conflict

  • Conflict is the problem faced by the main character or characters.

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Plot

  • The problem the characters face and the way the problems are solved make up the plot.

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Climax
Climax

  • The middle, or body of a story tells how the characters’ problem or conflict gets bigger and bigger. The problem or conflict continues to grow until the story reaches its climax.

  • The climax is the point in the story where the problem or conflict stops getting bigger and starts to be solved.

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Climax:

The main character faces his or her problem at last; usually the most exciting part of the story.

Falling Action:

The main character realizes how the problem was solved and perhaps learns a lesson in life

Rising Action:

The main character tries to solve his or her problem.

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

Resolution:

The story comes to an interesting conclusion.

The characters, setting, and conflict is introduced.


(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Author s purpose viewpoint
Author’s Purpose & Viewpoint

Tip 1: Pay attention to the author’s attitude and word choice.

A person’s attitude is how he or she generally feels about something.

  • A positive attitude supports an issue or problem (“good” feelings)

  • A negative attitude opposes an issue or problem. (“bad” feelings)

  • A neutral attitude generally presents both sides of an issue or problem without taking sides.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Positive negative or neutral
Positive, Negative, or Neutral?

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.

Spinach

vegetables.


Positive negative or neutral1
Positive, Negative, or Neutral?

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Positive negative or neutral2
Positive, Negative, or Neutral?

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Tip 2: Determine the author’s purpose for writing.

  • Writing to Inform or Explain

    • Authors want to give you information. They may tell facts they think you will find interesting. They may explain or show how something works. The main purpose of this kind of passage is to teach or inform.

    • Writing to Describe

      • Authors can help you see or understand something unfamiliar by describing what it is like.

      • Writing to Entertain

        • They may want to amuse you with a funny story, play, or poem, or frighten you with a scary tale, other types would be fantasy, mystery, adventure, science fiction, anything you read “just for fun”.

        • Writing to Persuade

          • Sometimes authors want you to agree with them. This is the author’s attempt to change your mind about something. These types of passages are usually filled with opinions.


What s my purpose
What’s my purpose?

  • A newspaper editorial

  • Guidebook with maps

  • Short story

  • News article

persuade

describe

entertain

Inform or Explain

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Tip 3: Use evidence from the passage to determine the author’s position on a topic.

An author’s position is his or her opinion about a topic. Figuring out the author’s attitude and purpose will help you determine his or her opinion.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Author s purpose
Author’s Purpose author’s position on a topic.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


( author’s position on a topic.R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Tip 4: Determine whether statements are facts or opinions. author’s position on a topic.

O

F

O

O

F

F

F

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Tip 5: Notice whether the author supports his or her opinions with facts or opinions.

Should you always accept whatever the author tells you?

As a reader, you need to make sure the author supports what is said with facts.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Tip 6: Watch out for authors’ appeals to your emotions instead of your sense of reason.

Tip 7: Authors of fiction also use writing to influence readers.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


( instead of your sense of reason.R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


( instead of your sense of reason.R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


( instead of your sense of reason.R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Point of view
Point of View instead of your sense of reason.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


( instead of your sense of reason.R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Narrate
Narrate instead of your sense of reason.

  • To narrate is to tell a story.

  • Point of view describes who narrates the story.

  • First person narration, second-person narration, and third person narration

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


First person point of view
First Person Point of View instead of your sense of reason.

  • Sometimes one of the characters will narrate the story.

    • Use pronouns like: I, me, we, our, and so on.

    • When a character in the story is the narrator it is 1st person point of view

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Example of first person point of view
Example of First Person Point of View instead of your sense of reason.

Sandy and I approached the empty house with caution. “Be careful, Sandy. We don’t know who or what could be inside,” I warned.

Suddenly, Sandy grabbed my arm and hissed, “Sue! Something just moved in that upstairs window. Let’s get out of here Now!”

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Second person point of view
Second Person Point of View instead of your sense of reason.

  • A character tells a story about another character who is always addressed as “you.”

  • Example: “You go to the store on Friday afternoon.”

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Third person point of view
Third Person Point of View instead of your sense of reason.

  • Third person point of view is when a narrator from outside of the story tells what happens.

    Two types: Limited narration and omniscient

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Third person limited narration
Third person limited narration instead of your sense of reason.

  • Shows the events through the eyes of only one character. The reader knows what is going on in this one person’s mind and learns what others think only through their dialogue. (spoken words)

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Example of third person limited narration
Example of Third person limited narration instead of your sense of reason.

Sue felt deep concern as she and Sandy approached the empty house. “Be careful, Sandy,” Sue said. “We don’t know who or what could be inside.”

Suddenly, Sandy grabbed her friend’s arm and hissed, “Sue! Something just moved in that upstairs window. Let’s get out of here. Now!”

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Third person omniscient
Third person omniscient instead of your sense of reason.

  • Omniscient means “all-seeing”

  • In this point of view, the narrator shows what’s going on in all of the characters’ minds.

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Example of third person omniscient narration
Example of Third person omniscient narration instead of your sense of reason.

The girls approached the empty house with pounding hearts and deep concern. “Be careful, Sandy, “ Sue said. “We don’t know who or what could be inside.” Sue remembered that Sandy didn’t like the dark.

Suddenly, Sandy sensed danger. She grabbed her nervous friend’s arm and hissed, “Sue! Something just moved in that upstairs window. Let’s get out of here. Now!

(R5-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Why Is Point of View Important? instead of your sense of reason.

  • The narrator’s point of view determines what and how much you learn about the story’s characters, events, and places.

  • You have to know if you should believe the narrator:

    • How much does this narrator know and understand?

    • How much does this narrator want me to know?

    • How would this story be different if someone else were telling it?

    • Can I trust this narrator?


Point of View Practice instead of your sense of reason.

An automobile accident occurs. Two drivers are involved. Witnesses include three sidewalk spectators, a policeman, a man with a video camera who happened to be shooting the scene, and the pilot of a helicopter that was flying overhead. Here we have eight different points of view and, most likely, nine different descriptions of the accident.

On the back of your notes write a 3-4 sentence description of the accident in each of the different points of view.


(S1C6-PO6) instead of your sense of reason.

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


Cause and effect
Cause and Effect instead of your sense of reason.

(S1C6-PO6)

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


Cause and Effect instead of your sense of reason.

(S1C6-PO6)

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


(S1C6-PO6) instead of your sense of reason.

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


Practice 1
Practice 1 instead of your sense of reason.

(S1C6-PO6)

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


Practice 2
Practice 2 instead of your sense of reason.

(S1C6-PO6)

We can explain the multiple causes leading up to a main event in a story by creating a graphic organizer.


(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9) We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


I do by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9) We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

I do

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


We do by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

We do

(S2C1 PO1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 , 9)

We can summarize a story by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


We do by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


You do by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

I do.


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

I do.


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

We do.


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

We do.


Summarize by highlighting the elements of literature (characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution).

You do.


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