Purgatory in the elizabethan era
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Purgatory in the Elizabethan era. Through the different views on Purgatory in the Elizabethan era, it can be argued whether the ghost of King Hamlet was the true King or just a demon in manifestation. Katrina Kostecki. Purgatory. In the Elizabethan Era, there was the evocations of:

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Purgatory in the Elizabethan era

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Purgatory in the elizabethan era

Purgatory in the Elizabethan era

Through the different views on Purgatory in the Elizabethan era, it can be argued whether the ghost of King Hamlet was the true King or just a demon in manifestation.

Katrina Kostecki


Purgatory

Purgatory

In the Elizabethan Era, there was the evocations of:

Heaven, Hell and Purgatory(Waters 1).

  • Purgatory was believed to be the place that spirits went to in order to relieve their sins before they went to heaven. It was located within the earth (Poole 1).

  • Roman Catholics believed in the idea of purgatory since they thought that spirits that were too bad for Heaven but too good for Hell were placed in Purgatory in order to purge away their sins (Sommerville 1).

  • Protestants on the other hand disagreed with the Roman Catholics and thought that purgatory was just a money-making device of Catholic priests in order to sell indulgences (Sommerville1). They only believed in the aspect of Heaven and Hell.

(Wiki 1)


How a ghost gets to purgatory

How a ghost gets to purgatory

  • A ghost went to purgatory if they had not relieved their sins before they had died. Catholics believed that when someone died, they were put through two judgements. The spirit was judged as an individual and then rewarded good or ill. If the spirit still had sins that have not been confessed, they were sent to Purgatory to purge them away.

  • People who were in prayer or had confessed for their sins did not go to Purgatory and went straight to Heaven

  • People went to Hell if they disconnected themselves from God and did not ask for forgiveness for their sins.

    (Catholic 1)


Contrast between catholics and protestants

Contrast between Catholics and protestants

Purgatory was compared to Hell since they both were places for sinners to go, but spirits in Purgatory could move onto Heaven when they were forgiven for their sins.

Spirits in Purgatory were still connected to God and could go back to Heaven with him. Only Catholics believed in Purgatory.

Spirits in Hell were sinners that were not connected to Heaven and forever lived with their sins with the devil.

(Britaininprint 1).

(Mary 1)


Purgatory1

Purgatory


Purgatory in the elizabethan era

Hell


Purgatory in the elizabethan era

Different audience members could view this play differently:

Through the eyes of a Catholic, they could indicate that King Hamlet’s ghost was indeed himself and he came back to ask for repentance of his murder.

  • “The Ghost is the actual soul of the elder Hamlet, returned from purgatory in full possession of all his faculties to bring a message to his son” (Gajdošíková 21).

    Although, through the eyes of a Protestant, this ghost could actually be a demon from Hell that comes to tempt Hamlet into committing revenge to a crime that might not even be true.

  • Since protestants did not believe in Purgatory, “the Ghost was essentially a demon that wanted Hamlet to commit revenge” (Gajdošíková 21)


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