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Irrigation Management Practices. Lyndon Kelley MSU Extension / Purdue University Irrigation Management Agent. WWW.msue.msu.edu - find St. Joseph Co. - then hit the Irrigation button.

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Irrigation management practices

IrrigationManagement Practices

Lyndon Kelley

MSU Extension / Purdue University Irrigation Management Agent

WWW.msue.msu.edu - find St. Joseph Co.

- then hit the Irrigation button

Thanks to Dr. Ted Loudon - MSU Ag Engineering Dr. Ron Goldy - MSU Extension Dr. Jeff Andreasen – MSU Geography Dr. Steve Miller - MSU Ag Engineering


Tools for irrigation stewardship

Tools for Irrigation Stewardship

  • Irrigation System Uniformity

  • Preventing Irrigation Runoff (comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate)

  • Irrigation Scheduling

  • Backflow protection

  • Avoiding water use conflicts

  • Record keeping


Irrigation management practices

Irrigation power cost vary on: - power source - power cost - system pressure

Average fuel cost for pumping NE. USA: 2006

Cost per acre inch of irrigation water


Irrigation management practices

Day to Day Power Operation Costs

Table 2. Comparative Costs of Various Energy Sources to Obtain Equal Work Output per Dollar Spent

Source:AE-111 Comparable Costs of Various Energy Sources for Irrigation Pumping


Irrigation management practices

Estimated rainfall recharge

Scientific Investigations Report 2005–5284

U.S. Department of the Interior

U.S. Geological Survey


Irrigation management practices

Needed Irrigation

5.5”

Normal rainfall

34.6

Crop need

15.6” total


Thirty years of increasing irrigation have not impacted municipal water well depths

Thirty years of Increasing Irrigation have not Impacted Municipal Water Well Depths


Irrigation management practices

Have you seen yield map patterns that match the irrigation system configuration?


Irrigation system uniformity options

Irrigation System Uniformity -Options

  • Irrigator trainings (Extension, SCD, NRCS )

  • Private consultants

  • SCD


Irrigation system uniformity

Irrigation System Uniformity

  • An 1” application should be 1” everywhere in the irrigated field

  • 10% or less deviation from the average is ideal.

  • Over applied area will likely be over applied each

  • application

  • Under applied areas will likely be under applied each

  • application

  • A 30% deviation on a field in an 8” irrigation application year will have areas receiving as little as 5.6” and as great as 10.4”

  • Repair all visible system leaks and problems first.


Evaluating irrigation system uniformity

Evaluating Irrigation System Uniformity

Standards and Methods for Evaluation of Irrigation System Uniformity

  • Two commonly accepted standards or methods are available as guidelines for performing evaluations of Irrigation System Uniformity.

  • ASAE Standards (436.1) — Available at: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/mgsp/resources.htm

  • NRCS Handbook — Available at your local Natural Resource Conservation Service office or http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/nrcsirrig/irrig-handbooks-part652-chapter15.html


Irrigation system uniformity1

Irrigation System Uniformity

Basic system evaluation

Collect enough uniform container to to place every 10 feet the length of the system or across the application pattern.

Spread the container every ten feet from the center point to the outside edge of the application area.

Run the machine at standard setting over the container.

Measure and record the water volume caught by each container

Note sample point varying greater than 50% of the average.


Evaluating irrigation uniformity catch can stands

Evaluating Irrigation Uniformity Catch can stands

  • A simple , inexpensive catch can stand can be built using:

  • 32 oz. Deposable soda cup (Taco Bell cup)

  • 3” plastic drain pipe cut to 5” in length

  • 2”x3” stud cut to length to wedge into plastic drain pipe

  • Drill hole 1.5” into cut 2”x3” stud chucks, drill hole should snuggly fit electric fence post

  • Steel ( step in ) electric fence post

  • Electric fence post and cups can be stored and transported in separate stacks. The 2”x3” stud chucks wedge into the base of the cut plastic drain pipe sections and make the transition between the cup and post. Screw maybe pace through the side of the plastic drain pipe into the 2”x3” stud chucks.

  • Total cost per unit is less than a dollar and require only a saw, drill and screw driver. It will allow data collection


Evaluating irrigation system uniformity1

Evaluating Irrigation System Uniformity

Pivot Extensions (cornering arm or Z-arm)

  • Some center pivot irrigation systems are designed to expand the wetted area to allow coverage of corner or odd-shaped fields, often referred to as cornering arms or Z-arm. These systems require two separate evaluations if the extension accounts for 30 percent or more of the irrigated portion of the field. One evaluation will evaluate the system while extended, and a second when the arm is not deployed.


Overview of evaluation of irrigation system uniformity guidelines center pivot

Overview of Evaluation of Irrigation System Uniformity Guidelines (center pivot)

  • Have the producer walk the system length and note any application problems while the system is applying water. All known application problems need to be corrected before doing an evaluation of Irrigation System Uniformity.

  • Have the producer start the system and establish a setting for his normal application (avoid weather extremes).

  • Run the system for 10 minutes or more without changes to water supply system.

    • Place catch cans in a line from the center pivot point past the outer edge of the wetted area.

    • Catch cans should be placed to form a straight line from the pivot point to a point on the outer edge of the wetted area.

    • Space catch cans 20 feet apart for system overhead impact sprinklers, and 10 feet apart for all other center pivot application systems.

    • Place catch cans with opening at a height above the crop, or in a field opening width four times greater than the height difference between the crop and catch can opening.

    • A drop of mineral oil may be added to each catch can to minimize evaporation if a reading cannot be taken immediately and conditions favoring evaporation are prevalent.

    • If the catch can placement falls into the wheel tracks, it may be moved one to two feet to avoid damage.

  • Record the number of catch cans placed, the producer’s intended application, catch can opening diameter and other pertinent information. A sample record sheet to use for data collection follows.

  • Record volume collected from each catch can (ml.).

  • Record the locations of pivot wheel lanes


Evaluation of data

Evaluation of Data

Cleaning the Data

  • Catch can data from the first 10 percent of the system length closest to the center pivot point should be ignored. The “average catch can (ml)” data replaces the first catch can data points. The actual “distance from center point” is entered for the first data point (remaining after deletion of other points closer to the center pivot point). Coverage near the center point of the system represents such a small amount of the total system coverage deviation from the average, that it yields little effect on the machine’s overall uniformity.

  • Catch can data from the outer edge of the wetted area is deleted from the data set when the volume is less than 70 percent of the average. Removing the data that tails off at the outer edge of the system designates the effective irrigated area, and avoids dilution of the data points representing the actual targeted irrigated area.

  • Up to three percent of the data points should be removed if it is an extreme deviation from the average. This is done after the outer edge data has been removed to define the effective irrigated area and up to 20 percent of the inner area data has been removed. A few catch cans could collect extreme data that is not representative of the system area, like water running from a trust rod or brace rod directly to the cup.


System uniformity coefficient

System Uniformity Coefficient

  • System Uniformity Coefficient is a numeric judgment of the overall performance of an irrigation system’s ability to evenly apply water to the field.

  • A System Uniformity Coefficient of 85 percent or greater, is considered not to need major adjustments to the sprinkler package, although individual sections of the irrigator may benefit from corrections (green or black in the spreadsheet).

  • System Uniformity Coefficient of 80 to 85 percent may need further analysis of the sprinkler package, and individual sections of the irrigator would benefit from corrections (yellow in the spreadsheet).

  • System Uniformity Coefficient of less than 80 percent requires an adjustment to the sprinkler package design and correction of individual sections of the sprinkler package (red in the spreadsheet).


Irrigation management practices

2640’

Field #9


Irrigation management practices

2640’

Field #9


Irrigation management practices

2640’

Field #9


Irrigation management practices

Field #9


Creating a take home message for the producer

Creating a Take-home Message for the Producer

The System Uniformity Coefficient provides the producer with a report of the overall performance of the system. Almost all systems will benefit from some corrections.

Correction of areas of the system with greater than 20 percent deviation from average (red in the spreadsheet) will improve performance.

Entering a second data set, replacing the red (high deviation) data with the “average catch can (ml)” data, will create a before/after scenario that will identify the benefits of repairs or corrections to the system.

Graph of performance

The Excel spreadsheet can produce a line graph of systems uniformity. The data will not be weighted for coverage area represented by each cup.

Entering pivot wheel tracks into the graph using Microsoft standard AutoShape will make the graph more usable to irrigators.


Irrigation management practices

Sprinkler overlap with end gun

Tower

1

Tower

3

Tower

5

Tower

7

Tower

8

http://web1.msue.msu.edu/stjoseph/anr/anr.htm


Irrigation system uniformity2

Irrigation System Uniformity

  • Most system are designed to have 90% or better uniformity

  • Changes in volume and pressure from design parameters will cause reduction in uniformity

  • Some sprinklers can perform well over a large change in pressure over others

  • Multiple overlaps tends to reduce potential problems


Greatest improvement needed

Greatest improvement needed

  • End gun stop adjustment

  • Water supply over or under design

  • End gun orifice, too little or too much

  • Wrong sprinkler or tip

  • Leaks, plugs and no turn sprinklers


Irrigation management practices

Water supply over or under designsupply over design yield tail up,supply under design yield tail downExample of Water supply under volume for sprinkler design


Irrigation management practices

Sprinkler overlap with end gun

Tower 1

Tower 2

Tower 3


Over and under application issue affect the majority of the application area

Total Acres

126acres

96 acres

71 acres

49 acres

31 acres

18 acres

2 acres

2072’

3109’

30 acres

25 acres

22 acres

13 acres

10 acres

18 acres

4145’

330’

5181’

495’

6217’

7253’

660’

8290’

circumference

990’

Over and under application issue affect the majority of the application area

8 acres

6 acres

165’

825’

1155’

1320’

Feet from center


Most system apply within 85 of the expected application

Most system apply within 85% of the expected application

Application is 4 %

under expectation


Measure flow at desired pressure prior to ordering sprinkler package

Measure flow at desired pressure prior to ordering sprinkler package

Poor performance:

Ask dealer to measure flow at peak water use season and compare to design parameters.


Preventing irrigation runoff comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate

Preventing Irrigation Runoff(comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate)


Preventing irrigation runoff comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate1

Preventing Irrigation Runoff(comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate)

  • Sprinkler package or nozzle selection along with pressure dictates water application rate .

  • Factors that increase runoff :

  • Small Wetted area or throw of sprinkler

  • Low Pressure

  • Larger applications volumes

  • Soil compaction

  • Heavy soils

  • Slope

  • Row hilling


Irrigation management practices

  • Instructions for completing the Evaluating Potential Irrigation Runoff form :

  • Identify the areas of the irrigated field that has the lowest infiltration rates. (heavy soils, slopes, surface compaction).

  • Select a transit line in the wetted area just behind the machine that covers the identified lowest infiltration rates of the field identified above.


Irrigation management practices

  • Instructions for completing the Evaluating Potential Irrigation Runoff form – continued

  • Pace or measure 50 feet between observations starting at the pivot point and progressing to the furthest reaches of the machine.

  • Record observations for each location; look at several (4-5 areas) representing the row contour and differences in row traffic of the location. Record any specific concerns that may affect the application (drips or leaks) or affect the soils ability to take in water (compaction, row contours)

Key for Observation column

A- no observed puddling, ponding or sheen between rows

B- puddling, ponding or sheen between rows identified, but no observed runoff or flow of water

C-observed runoff or flow of water


Calculating instantaneous application rate

Calculating Instantaneous Application Rate

  • Flag the leading edge of the wetted area just inside of the last tower of the pivot.

  • Running the pivot at common speed with a measured and known application rate.

  • Using a stop watch measure the time elapsed from the first drops hitting the flag till the last.

  • Divide the measured and known application rate for the spot by the time elapsed.

  • Convert to Minute to provide 1 inch application.


Instantaneous application rate

Instantaneous Application Rate

  • Time it from first drop of irrigation to last

  • Divide by know application rate

  • Convert to minute to provide 1” of irrigation


Instantaneous application rate1

Instantaneous Application Rate

John applied .75 inches in 21 minute

.75 inches=1.00 inches

21 min. ? = 28 min./inch


The goal

The Goal

  • Apply a consistent uniform amount of water over the whole field.

  • Apply water at a rate (volume/time ) that can infiltrate into soil avoiding runoff.

  • Avoid water loss to air or off target.


Irrigation management practices

The larger the wetted area the slower the rate of application.

Average 1’ rainfall comes over 4 hours.

An 1’ rainfall over an hour is considered a “Toad strangler”

Sprinkler packages are commonly available with instantaneous application rates from 1” per 12 minutes to 1” per 80 minutes


Angle

Angle


Height

Height


Preventing irrigation runoff comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate2

Preventing Irrigation Runoff(comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate)

  • Management factors that increase runoff:

  • Larger applications volumes

  • Soil compaction

  • Heavy soils

  • Slope

  • Row hilling


Irrigation system uniformity3

Irrigation System Uniformity

  • Sprinkler package or nozzle selection along with pressure dictates water application rate .

  • Factors that increase runoff:

  • Small wetted area or throw of sprinkler

  • Low Pressure


Instantaneous application rate2

Total Acres

126acres

96 acres

71 acres

49 acres

31 acres

18 acres

2 acres

2072’

3109’

30 acres

25 acres

22 acres

13 acres

10 acres

18 acres

4145’

330’

5181’

495’

6217’

7253’

660’

8290’

circumference

990’

Instantaneous application rate

8 acres

3 days / circle @ 1”

3 days = 4320 min.

8290’ / 4320 min.=

= 1.92’/minute

20’ ft. wetted area=

= 1” / 10.4 Minutes

40’ ft. wetted area=

= 1” / 20.8 Minutes

6 acres

165’

825’

1155’

1320’

Feet from center


Irrigation scheduling checkbook method

Irrigation Scheduling Checkbook Method


Think of your soil as a bank

Think of your soil as a bank

Soil type :

Heavier soil can hold more water / foot of depth than light soils

Water holding capacity:

The soil (bank) can hold only a given volume of water before it allow it to pass lower down.

Intake rate:

Water applied faster than the soil intake rate is lost.

Deletion:

Plants can pull out only 30 - 60% of the water

Rooting depth:

The plant can only get water to the depth of it’s roots.

Water lost from the bottom of the profile can wash out (leach) water soluble nutrients and pesticides.


Irrigation management practices

Calculating Water Holding Capacity


Irrigation management practices

Calculating Water Holding Capacity


Available water holding capacity

Available Water Holding Capacity


Rain gauges

Rain Gauges

  • Basic unit – 2 inch opening

  • Cost less than $10

  • One rain gauge for each 40 acres.

  • Recording rain gauge cost $50 - $100


Water quantity needed

Water Quantity Needed

  • Irrigation water replaces the plant water use (removed from soil)

  • Water use is directly correlated to light interception

  • 50% light interception results in about 50% of the maximum water use

  • Maximum water use mid-July early August, full light interception, highest temperatures brightest and longest days.

    Evapotranspiration (ET) =fn (net radiation) +

    fn (temperature) +

    fn (wind speed) +

    fn (air humidity)


Weighing lysimeter

Weighing Lysimeter

Rain and Irrigation increase weight

Evapotransporation decrease weight


Irrigation management practices

Field beans

Corn

Soys

Potato

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

Corn

Field

beans

Soys

From Minnesota Extension bulletin “Irrigation Scheduling”, assuming temperature 80-89


1 irrigation runoff comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate 0 30 loss

Sprinkler overlap with end gun

  • 2. Lack of system uniformity

  • 5-35% loss in effectiveness

1. Irrigation Runoff(comparing irrigation application rate to soil infiltration rate) 0 -30 % loss

Three factor reducing effective water application

  • 3. Evaporative loss to the air

  • Minimal loss in our humid area

  • 0 – 6%

  • Estimated 4-6% loss in Nebraska


Irrigation management practices

Net application at various application rates


Irrigation management practices

Necessary application rate to achieve effective

evapo-transportation rates at variousapplication efficiencies


Quantity needed

Quantity Needed

  • Maximum water use for most crops is .27 - .32 in./day

  • 3 gal/minute/acre pump capacity = 1”/week

  • 5 gal/minute/acre pump capacity = .25 in./day

  • 7 gal/minute/acre pump capacity =.33 in./day, 1”every 3 days

  • 500 gal/minute pump can provide 1” every 4 days on 100 acres


Quantity needed1

Quantity Needed

In a hot 1st week of August John’s corn crop ET. was .30 in./day

John’s field has a AWC of 3.0 in.(Available water capacity)

He started irrigating when the AWC was 1.0 in. down

John’s irrigation system can apply .20 in./day.

By the end of the week how far behind is John? (.30 -.20)x7 =.70 in.

During 2nd week of August, ET. remains .30 in./day, John shuts

down 2 days for repair. By week end how far behind is John? (.5 +.6)= 1.1in.2.80 in. total deficit

3rd. Week, no rain, John’s corn field is hurting.


Limited water supply irrigation management

Limited water supply irrigation management

  • Diversify the crops sharing the water supply between high and low water use.

  • Stager planting date to stager peak water need times.

  • Plant part of irrigated area to a sacrifice crop to neglect during extended drought.

  • Start irrigating early to bank water ahead.

  • Stager forage crop cutting dates to avoid simultaneous peak use.


Irrigation management practices

20 acres

30 acres

20 acres

30 acres

1320’

Field #10

1109’


Irrigation management practices

Field beans

Corn

Soys

Potato

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

Corn

Field

beans

Soys

From Minnesota Extension bulletin “Irrigation Scheduling”, assuming temperature 80-89


Irrigation scheduling checkbook method university of minnesota

Irrigation Scheduling Checkbook Method –University of Minnesota

  • Items to Conduct Checkbook Irrigation Scheduling

  • Two or more rain gauges

  • Max-Min thermometer or access to local temperature reports

  • Soil probe or in field moisture sensors

  • Daily crop water use table or local ET hotline or website report

  • Soil water balance worksheets

  • Estimate of soil moisture holding capacity


Irrigation management practices

60”

SW 1/4

Frasier

60”

SW 1/4

Frasier

3.0

30”

3.0

30”

50

1.5

50

1.5

2.23

2.06

1.89

1.69

1.49

2.07

1.90

2.23

2.06

1.89

1.69

1.49

2.07

1.90

0.77

0.94

1.11

1.31

1.51

0.93

1.10

Jun 21

Jun 22

Jun 23

Jun 24

Jun 25

Jun 26

75

75

85

75

75

75

.17

.17

.20

.20

.17

.17

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

Jun 21

Jun 22

Jun 23

Jun 24

Jun 25

Jun 26

75

75

85

75

75

75

.17

.17

.20

.20

.17

.17

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

0.75

0.75


Irrigation management practices

6-1-08

SW 1/4

corn

3.0

36”

50

1.5

Available

2.00

1.85

1.70

1.52

1.34

1.94

1.79

Jun 21

Jun 22

Jun 23

Jun 24

Jun 25

Jun 26

75

75

85

85

75

75

.15

.15

.18

.18

.15

.15

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

0.75


Irrigation management practices

6-1-08

SW 1/4

corn

3.0

36”

50

1.5

Available

2.00

1.85

1.70

1.52

1.34

1.94

1.79

Jun 21

Jun 22

Jun 23

Jun 24

Jun 25

Jun 26

75

75

85

85

75

75

.15

.15

.18

.18

.15

.15

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

0.75


Irrigation management practices

Table 9. Average water use for any other crops when at full canopy at different times of the season

Source: Data estimates full potential of daily ET per week by Killen, and was placed in the above table by Wright in January 2002.


Irrigation management practices

www.agry.purdue.edu/irrigation/IrrDown.htm


Irrigation management practices

MichIana Irrigation Scheduler: Purdue Agronomy web site

–Est. From High / Low temp. & date


Irrigation management practices

Mendon Estimated Evapotranspiration (ET) for July 4, 2008

  • Irrigation scheduling links:

  • Historical E.T. for this site

  • MSU Scheduler IS 4

  • MichIana Irrigation Scheduler

  • MSU Scheduler Excel

  • MSU Paper check book system

  • Explanation of estimated E.T..

  • Corn – 105 day maturity emerging on the listed date in 30” rows.

  • Soybean – for grow 3.0 emerging on the listed date.

  • E.T. have been estimate for two days in the future based on future weather forecast.


Irrigation scheduling checkbook challenges

Irrigation Scheduling Checkbook Challenges

?? Soil Moisture ??

Errors will accumulate over time - Weekly ground truthing needed

Rainfall variability is more than often considered

Only "effective” rainfall and irrigation should be considered - Only water entering root zone uniformly is "effective”

Corn crop mature in program by calendar, not heat


Irrigation management practices

Sprinkler overlap with end gun

WWW.msue.msu.edu/St Joe /Irrigation

Tower

1

Tower

3

Tower

5

Tower

7

Tower

8


Irrigation management practices

Water supply over or under designsupply over design yield tail up,supply under design yield tail downExample of water supply under volume for sprinkler design


Over and under application issue affect the majority of the application area1

Total Acres

126acres

96 acres

71 acres

49 acres

31 acres

18 acres

2 acres

2072’

3109’

30 acres

25 acres

22 acres

13 acres

10 acres

18 acres

4145’

330’

5181’

495’

6217’

7253’

660’

8290’

circumference

990’

Over and under application issue affect the majority of the application area

8 acres

6 acres

165’

825’

1155’

1320’

Feet from center


Most system apply within 85 of the expected application1

Most system apply within 85% of the expected application

Application is 4 %

under expectation


Measure flow at desired pressure prior to ordering sprinkler package1

Measure flow at desired pressure prior to ordering sprinkler package

Poor performance:

Ask dealer to measure flow at peak water use season and compare to design parameters.


Assure the best plant stand possible

Assure the best plant stand possible

  • Irrigate, if necessary, to make sure to get maximum germination and uniform emergence.

  • Wet down 2.5” within five days of planting, ½” in most irrigated soil

  • Maintain a moist surface,0.10” to 0.20” applications, till spike.

  • Are you ready to irrigate the day you plant?


Using irrigation to get the most from pesticides and nutrients

Using irrigation to get the most from pesticides and nutrients

Timely application of irrigation water:

  • Improves incorporation of herbicides.

  • Improves activation of herbicides.

  • Improves activation/reactivation of insecticides.

  • Reduces nitrogen volatilization.

  • Maximizes yield to utilize the resources.


Irrigation management practices

  • Do not apply this product through any type of irrigation system.

  • If available, sprinkler irrigate within 2 days after application. Apply ½” -1” of water. Use lower water volumes (½” ) on coarse-textured soils, higher volumes heavier soils (1”) on fine-textured soils.


Irrigation management practices

Chemigation – Application of pesticide via irrigation water.

Fertigation – Application of fertilizer via irrigation water.


Chemigation label

Chemigation Label

  • Chemigation labels provide specific mixing application and safety precautions for irrigation applications.

  • EPA requires products applied through irrigation systems to have a chemigation label.


Calibrating a center pivot for chemigation

Calibrating a Center Pivot for Chemigation


Chemigation valve requirements

Chemigation Valve Requirements

Indiana and Michigan have specific chemigation valve requirements for public water supply connections but not for private water supplies.

Both States require adequate protection of water supply in law or well code.


Irrigation management practices

Most chemigation valves consist of:

air and vacuum relief valve

spring-loaded check valve

4 inch inspection port

injection port for introducing the chemicals

Flow direction

a low pressure drain


Chemigation fertigation systems safety interlock

Chemigation / Fertigation Systems - Safety Interlock


Backflow protection chemigation valve

Backflow protection (chemigation valve)


Positive displacement injection pump

Positive displacement injection pump


Injection nozzle with back flow protection

Injection nozzle with back flow protection


Storage mixing tank

Storage / mixing tank


High pressure hose injection hose 160 psi

High Pressure hose (injection hose, 160 psi)


Supply hose sized to gravity flow needed volume to pump

Supply hose(sized to gravity flow needed volume to pump)


Backflow situation what do i do

Backflow situation – What do I do?

Pump, Pump, Pump as soon as possible.

Nebraska study showed 990/1000 gallon recovery in the first hour when pumping started immediately.

  • 999/1000 gallon after the first day of pumping.

  • 99.9% one day pumping recovery is reduced 10-20% if you start 24 hour later.


Equip groundwater conservation program

Equip Groundwater Conservation Program

An NRCS Program to support Irrigation System Evaluations and System Corrections


Equip groundwater conservation program michigan

Equip Groundwater Conservation Program - Michigan

  • Qualifications

    • System must have been in place for at least 2 years

    • Must use irrigation scheduling (Computerized or Paper System)

    • System uniformity coefficient must be below 85% to enter, and above 85% to qualify for payments.

    • Need to have an irrigation conservation plan

      • Write up that describes system, water source, how the irrigation is applied,


2009 eqip groundwater conservation program michigan

2009 EQIP Groundwater Conservation Program - Michigan

  • Compensation:

    • A one time payment of $31/acre. (down from $50)

    • ( was a maximum of 160 acres per producer )

    • Scheduling is required annual payment of $11.40/acre (up from $5)

    • See you local NRCS office.


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