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SDPBC Assistant Principals November 10, 2010. Student involved Classroom Assessment. SDPBC Assistant Principals November 10, 2010. Bill Thompson Department of Assessment PX 48664. Prelude:.

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Student involved classroom assessment

SDPBC Assistant Principals

November 10, 2010

Student involved Classroom Assessment


Bill thompson department of assessment px 48664

SDPBC Assistant Principals

November 10, 2010

Bill Thompson Department of Assessment PX 48664


Prelude:

Power point is posted on Dept. of Assessment webpage--think GreenGoal is for you to think about thinking about the role of classroom level assessment in your SchoolNo procedural mandates are intended


Rick Stiggins, 2005:

“The teaching profession is a calling, a calling with potential to do enormous good for students. Although we haven’t traditionally seen it is this light, assessment plays an indispensable role in fulfilling our calling. Used with skill, assessment can motivate the unmotivated, restore the desire to learn, and encourage students to keep learning, and it can actually create—not simply measure—increased achievement.”


Classroom Assessment Literacy

classroom assessment for student learningDoing it right, using it well:Richard J. Stiggins, Assessment training institute, 2004.


The teaching profession is a calling a calling with potential to do enormous good for students

Rick Stiggins, 2005:

“The teaching profession is a calling, a calling with potential to do enormous good for students.”


Sort and Select

Vs.

No Child Left Behind

(Adequate Yearly Progress

Toward Proficiency)

A Shift in the Purpose of Education



No Child Left Behind

(Adequate Yearly Progress

Toward Proficiency)

What Must We Do To Succeed?

A Shift in the Purpose of Education


We must increase student performance

How Can We “Do Enormous Good For Students”?

We must Increase student performance.


How Do Increase Student Performance?

Rigor, Relevance, and Relationship

Of these, Relationship may well be the most important.

It’s really all about the nature of our relationship with students.

-


How Do Increase Student Performance?

Rigor, Relevance, and Relationship

It’s really all about the nature of our relationship with students.

Career Academies

K-2 Literacy Initiative

-


Increase Student Performance

Rigor, Relevance, and Relationship

What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


What are some key ingredients to a successful relationship with students

Talk Amongst Yourselves:

What are some key ingredients to a successful relationship with students?


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Motivating Students and teachers in an Era of Standards:

Richard Sagor, ASCD 2003.

What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Competence What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Belonging What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Usefulness What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Potency What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

Optimism What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

-


Meeting Human Emotional Needs

What is the basis for a productive classroom relationship with students?

We Must Meet Their Basic Human Needs.

-


Rick Stiggins, 2005:

“Although we haven’t traditionally seen it is this light, assessment plays an indispensable role in fulfilling our calling.”


Practices of high performing schools comprehensive and balanced assessment system
Practices of High Performing Schools-Comprehensive and Balanced Assessment System

State: Assessment

State: Assessment

District: Benchmark Assessments

School:Unit Tests

Teacher:Daily Monitoring

Teacher:Daily Monitoring


A Systemof Progress Monitoring

Level 3 - Policy Level User: Superintendents, Policy Makers (School Board, Dept. of Ed., Business & Community Leaders)

Level 2 - Support User:

Principal, Curriculum Leaders, Teacher Teams

Level 1 – Classroom User

Student,

Teacher,

Parent


Practices of high performing palm beach county schools
Practices of High Performing Palm Beach County Schools



What Is the Proper Balance?


What Is the TypicalBalance?


Rick Stiggins, 2005:

“The teaching profession is a calling, a calling with potential to do enormous good for students.”

How much good can we do?


Research Findings

Inside the Black Box, Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment:Black and Wiliam, Phi Delta Kappan, Last Modified in January, 2008Effect size 0.4—0.7Greatest gains are by low performing students


Research Findings

  • Effect Size 0.4

  • 50th to 65th percentile

  • Two letter grade improvement

  • 2.0 Math PYG

  • 2.5 Reading PYG

-


Research Findings

  • Effect Size 0.7

  • US from middle to top 5 in World

  • 3.0 Math PYG

  • 3.5 Reading PYG

  • Effects similar to one-on-one tutoring

-


Marzano, R., 2000; Borman, G.D.; Hewes, G.M. et al., 2000

Opportunity to Learn affects student achievement

more than double any other school factors.

Percentile Gain*

* The average gain in percentile points of the average student in the experimental group compared to the average student in the control group.


Opportunity to learn
Opportunity to Learn

District articulates a rigorous curriculum (clear targets)

Monitors extent teachers cover the curriculum

Has assessments based on the curriculum

In short, teachers teach students what students need to learn.


Research Findings

Instructional TargetsIt’s all about providing students with the opportunity to learn by setting and hitting the instructional targets

-


Students can hit any target that they can see and holds still for them rick stiggins

Understanding Learning Targets

“Students can hit any target that they can see and holds still for them.”--rick Stiggins.


From where do we get the targets

Talk Amongst Yourselves:

From where do we get the targets?


Instructional Targets

What are the targets?Where do we find the targets?

-


The Target

Standards

Benchmarks

Big Ideas

Objectives

Lessons

NGSSS


Targets From Benchmarks

Benchmarks Contain Multiple Facets


Targets From Benchmarks

SC.3.P.8.1Measure and compare the temperatures of various samples of solids and liquids

-


Targets From Benchmarks

SC.3.P.8.1Measure and compare the temperatures of various samples of solids and liquids

-


Types of Targets, Stiggins, 2004

Knowledge/

Understanding

Reasoning

Skills

Products


Instructional Targets

Knowledge/

Understanding

  • Explain measurement concepts

  • Identify solids and liquids.

  • Solve problems.

  • Compare concepts and constructs

Reasoning

  • Use measurement tools.

  • Conduct investigations.

Skills

  • Create a chart.

  • Construct research reports.

Products


Student “I Can” Targets

Knowledge/

Understanding

  • I can explain measurement concepts

  • I can identify solids and liquids.

  • I can solve problems.

  • I can compare concepts and constructs.

Reasoning

  • I can use measurement tools.

  • I can conduct investigations.

Skills

  • I can make a chart.

  • I can do research reports.

Products


Target and Assessment Types – What’s the match?

Knowledge/

Understanding

  • Selected Response (Matching, MC, T/F, - Paper/Pencil)

  • Extended Written/Oral Responses

Reasoning

  • Extended Written/Oral Responses

  • Performance Assessment

Skills

  • Actual Student Work

Products


Target and Assessments – Alignment

NGSSS

ASSESSMENT

CURRICULUM

INSTRUCTION


Every Day, Every Lesson

  • Has specific targets.

  • Specifies for teachers and students what the targets are.

  • Measures the students’ acquisition of the targets.

  • Is followed by re-teaching of targets missed.

  • Re-assesses the re-taught targets.

-


Why do some students fail

Talk Amongst Yourselves:

Why do some students fail?



Rick Stiggins, 2005:

“Used with skill, assessment can motivate the unmotivated, restore the desire to learn, and encourage students to keep learning, and it can actually create—not simply measure—increased achievement.”


Student Involvement - Motivation

Intrinsic

Feeling of accomplishment

Extrinsic

external reward or punishment avoidance

MOTIVATION

Long-Term Success

Short-Term Success

Which is practiced more often?


We increase students involvement in their own learning

How Can We Increase

Students’ Intrinsic Motivation?

we increase Students’ involvement in their own learning.


We can use classroom assessments to increase students involvement in their own learning

How Can We Increase

Student Involvement?

we can use classroom assessments to increase Students’ involvement in their own learning.


Student Involvement - Motivation

Satisfaction of basic needs:

  • Optimism

  • Competence

  • Belonging

  • Usefulness

  • Potency

Sagor, 2003


Student Involvement - Motivation

Competence

Credible Success

  • Use assessment as an authentic way to increase opportunities for students to feel competent

  • Increase success


Student Involvement - Motivation

Belonging

  • use classroom governance to promote affiliation

  • make assessments friendly to diverse learning styles and cultural differences

Comfort and acceptance


Student Involvement - Motivation

Usefulness

  • use cooperative learning andindividual assessment

  • organize instruction and assessment to include problem-based learning and service help learning

The knowledge that others need us and want our help


Student Involvement - Motivation

Potency

  • Students have power or influence over their ultimate success.

  • Students experience outcomes that are related to their own actions, effort and hard work, not outside forces.

The need for power


Student Involvement - Motivation

Optimism

Believe in success!

Vision over the future

Ensuring the students have feelings of competence, belonging, usefulness, and potency leads to optimism


Basic Needs Working Together = Motivation

Competence

Optimism

Potency

Belonging

Usefulness


We can give students information so that they can improve

How Else Can We Increase

Student Motivation?

We can give students information so that they can improve.


Feedback feed forward

Understanding Learning Targets

Feedback/feed-forward


Using Assessment to Provide Feedback

Be clear to students when they have serious problems

Explain where and why students have made errors

FEEDBACK/FEED-FORWARD

Constructive-

Descriptive

Provide ample time to make corrections and be successful; delaying feedback diminishes the value for learning

Honest

Suggest improvements that are achievable

Timely

Realistic

Should be linked to objectives and standards

Specific to learning outcomes

Detailed

Be specific on how to improve

Focused

Frequent

Maintain students moving in the right direction, not making erroneous assumptions

Target achievement, not effort


Feedback/Feed-forward = Motivation

Positive feedback

Feed-forward

Constructive feedback

  • celebrates success, and helps keep students motivated

  • provides an outline of the next steps to be taken

  • highlights important aspects to focus on


Who Gives Feedback? Who Feeds-Forward?

  • Teachers

  • Classmates

  • Team

  • Class

  • Parents


We can encourage students to track their own progress

How Else Can We Increase

Student Motivation?

We can encourage students to track their own progress.


Sal p i can statements classroom level assessments

Setting and Monitoring

Academic Goals

SAL-P“I Can” StatementsClassroom level assessments


Setting Academic Goals

benchmark

1. Product

2. Performance Task

3. Assessment

Knowledge

Skill

Weakness

Must learn to go to the next level

Product

Performance

Davies, Cameron, Politano and Gregory (2003)

A learning goal is a statement of what a student will know or be able to do.


Monitoring Progress

Marzano, 2006


We can encourage students to communicate their progress with an adult who is important to them

How Else Can We Increase

Student Motivation?

We can encourage students to communicate their progress with an adult who is important to them.


Together is better anne davies et al peguis publisher 1992

Student-Led Conference

Together is Better: anne Davies, et. al., peguis publisher, 1992.


Communicating reporting on learning outcomes

Student-Led Conference

Communicating & Reporting on learning outcomes


Student-Led Conference

Student invites parentspre-set agendastudent reports: LEARNING TARGETS work samplesREQUIRES REHEARSAL


Monitoring Progress

Marzano, 2006




Progress Monitoring

Target

Fluency Charts



What About Grading?

Warning:The following contains explicit information that may be contrary to beliefs held by the viewer resulting in possible Feelings of anxiety or even anger.


Sort and Select

Vs.

No Child Left Behind

(Adequate Yearly Progress

Toward Proficiency)

A Shift in the Purpose of Education


Traditional “Objective” grading

Vs.

Standards Based Grading

A Shift in Grading


Traditional “Objective” grading

More Reliable

Vs.

Standards Based Grading

Less Reliable

Myth Buster


Can you rely on a 100 point scale?Presented by Robert marzano:Ahead of the Curve Conference, Solution tree, Atlanta, Georgia, 2008



Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 2008

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20081

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20082

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20083

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008



Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20084

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20085

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20086

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20087

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20088

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 20089

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008


Can you r ely on a 100 p oint s cale marzano 200810

Can You Rely on a 100 Point Scale?Marzano, 2008



How to grade for learning linking grades to standards ken o connor corwin press 2002

What About Grading?

How to grade for learning, linking grades to standards: ken O'Connor, corwin press, 2002.


1. Adequate Work Sampling

  • Measure and compare the temperatures for various samples of solids and liquids.

  • I can:

    • explain the difference between heat and temperature

    • measure in Celsius and Fahrenheit

    • use temperature to determine what clothes to wear

    • find the temperature of different solids

    • design a thermos to keep drinks cold

    • measure and compare the temperature of solids and liquids



2. Grade in Pencil

Grading should reflect the student’s performance

at the time of the grading.

Reassessment without penalty—

Criterion-referenced not standardized


NGSSS

3. Use High Quality Assessments – Directly Related to Standards and Aligned Instruction

ASSESSMENT

CURRICULUM

INSTRUCTION


Student Involved Assessments

  • Learning styles and multiple intelligences

  • Some student choice

  • All aspects discussed with, and understood by, students


From Gradesto Reporting

  • Achievement only

  • Individual work only

  • Limited and careful “number crunching”—if at all

    • Use of mode or median, not mean (average)


Ideas and Examples

  • Ratio of targets instructed and met

    • X targets met ÷ y targets instructed = Z%

  • Holistic Rubric

    • Based on “I Can” Statements


Ideas and Examples

  • Rubric Conversion

    • 3.0—4.0 = A

    • 2.50—2.99 = B

    • 2.0—2.49 = C

    • 1.5—1.99 = D

    • Below 1.5 = F

  • Rubric Conversion

    • 4.0 = Exemplary

    • 3.0 = Proficient

    • 2.0 = Approaching

    • 1.0 = Needs Development


Ideas and Examples--Triangulation

TASK

OBSERVATION

PRODUCT

CONVERSATION


Sort and Select

Vs.

No Child Left Behind

(Adequate Yearly Progress

Toward Proficiency)

A Shift in the Purpose of Education


Hopelessness and Despair

Vs.

Hope and Optimism

A Shift in the Purpose of Education


Winners and Losers

Vs.

Hope and Optimism

A Shift in the Purpose of Education


Student Involvement - Motivation

Optimism

BelieFin success!

Vision over the future

Ensuring the students have feelings of competence, belonging, usefulness, and potency leads to optimism


In our students words

How Can We Increase

Student Motivation and Performance?

In Our Students’ Words


Feeling of Competence

I can do this! I did this!

I can answer this question even though it is challenging.

I can evaluate and monitor my progress.

I can assess my own learning.

I know the importance of assessments.

I know the purpose of academic standards.

I know what I need to do to improve.

I know the target.


Feeling of Belonging

I feel respected in my class.

I feel cared for by my teachers and my peers.

I am given personal feedback on my assessment results by my teachers and my peers.

I have enough time to complete my assignments and tests.


Feeling of Usefulness

I am needed by my peers to help them with their challenges.

I am important for the success of my group.

I am valued by my teachers and my peers for my strengths.

I can tutor my peers.


Feeling of Potency

I have the power to do well.

I have control over my behavior and performance.

I am allowed to make choices on my assignments.

I am involved in the assessment process.

I have a clear understanding of the classroom goals and objectives.

I monitor my own progress regularly.


Feeling of Optimism

I know I will do well in the future.

I have a vision for my future.

I experience success in my assessments.

I am rewarded for my success.

“I know what I want to do.”

“The future looks bright!”


Motivating the whole child

Belonging

Optimism

Assessment Literate

Usefulness

Competence

Optimism

Potency


The end and thank you

Student Involved Classroom Assessment

The end andThank you!!


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