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Aim: How can we understand the relative pronoun in Latin?. Look at these sentences. How is the boldfaced word translated in each? Why are the forms of this word different?. Cornelia est puella Romana quae in Italia habitat.

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Look at these sentences. How is the boldfaced word translated in each? Why are the forms of this word different?

Cornelia estpuellaRomana quae in Italia habitat.

Aurelia et Cornelia spectabant servos qui in villa laborabant.


The relative pronoun translated in each? qui,quae, quod (who, which) introduces a relative clause in Latin.

It refers back to a previous noun in the sentence called the antecedent.


Here are the forms of the relative pronoun translated in each? qui, quae, quod (who, which). Fill in the meanings for each case on your handout. How many of the endings look familiar, and why?


Now let’s explore the relationship of the pronoun to its antecedent. Look at these sentences and see if you can(1) bracket the relative clause (2) draw an arrow from the relative pronoun to the antecedent (3) explain the reason for the case, number, and gender of the relative pronoun.

Pugnatis cum militibusqui timorem in pectoribus non habent.

You are fighting with soldiers who do not have fear in (their) hearts.

Lacrimaefluebant ex oculishominiscuifabulanarrabatur.

The tears were flowing from the eyes of a person towhom the story was being told.

Ancillaquam Aurelia vocaverat ad cubiculum festinabat.

The slavewomanwhom Aurelia had called hurried to the bedroom.


  • Vir antecedent. qui per viamcurrebat ad terramcecidit.

  • The man who was running along the road fell to the ground.

  • Puellacui Marcus librumdediterat Cornelia.

  • The girl to whom Marcus gave the book was Cornelia.

  • Servuscuiusdominuseratiratusstatimaufugit.

  • The slave whose master was angry immediately fled.

  • Duo serviquos Cornelia conspexit per viamambulabant.

  • Two slaves whom Cornelia caught sight of were walking along the road.


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