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Research @ Towers Library Gr 9: Science F air. Finding and citing resources. Objectives. To know how and where to look for valid reliable information To be able to cite references properly. Science Fair project. You need t o: Ask a question Do background r esearch

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Presentation Transcript
objectives
Objectives
  • To know how and where to look for valid reliable information
  • To be able to cite references properly
science fair project
Science Fair project
  • You need to:
    • Ask a question
    • Do background research
    • Construct a hypothesis
    • Test your hypothesis by doing an experiment
    • Analyze your data and draw your conclusion
    • Communicate your results
    • Evaluate the success of your project
why do background research
Why do background research?

To:

  • find out more about your topic
  • help find ideas about which variables to test
  • predict what might happen in the investigation when making a hypothesis
  • enable you to interpret the theory and explain the results to others – especially a science fair judge!
first of all choose a topic
First of all: Choose a topic
  • Think about …
    • What really interests you?
    • Browse widely for inspiration: newspapers, science magazines, science on tv, YouTube
    • Find something different or unique
then develop a research plan
Then … develop a research plan
  • Determine the keywords for your research question, e.g.,

Does whole-wheat bread go mouldy faster than white bread?

  • Ask who, what, why, when, where and how questions about your main key word (variable).
  • Create a research plan (See Science Buddies website http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_background_research_plan.shtml).
next step find background info
Next step: find background info …
  • Books and periodicals
  • Reliable websites
  • Databases via Towers Library or via your local library
  • Other people: your science teacher, your parents or family, a professor or expert
  • Your librarian
tips on how to look
Tips on how to look…
  • Use keyword searching, e.g., mould
  • Phrase searching, e.g., “Science Fair”
  • Truncation, e.g., Scien*
  • Boolean logic: AND, NOT, OR
    • Bread AND mould
    • Mould OR mold
  • Use synonyms, e.g.,
      • mould, mildew, fungus
      • Use the tilde symbol before keyword, e.g., ~ mould
where to look towers library online databases
Where to look …Towers Library online databases
  • I’ll show you first …
  • On the Towers Library web page, there are several science databases:
    • Access Science
    • Scientific American
    • Also try searching within Knowledge Ontario: e.g., Gale Power Search
databases really help you save time
Databases really help you save time!
  • You can find information in the database and links from the database to other articles, images and trustworthy websites.
  • Get organized:
    • Make a research folder in the database to save what looks interesting and useful. OR
    • Make notes – start a OneNote folder for your project.
    • Use the citation help and save citations.
  • No luck? Try using different search terms – make sure you note the ones you’ve used.
your turn now
Your turn now …
  • First, a suggestion: make a notes page and divide it into the sections of your project.
  • Then, go to Towers Library online.
  • Start with Britannica or World Book and try a basic search for your topic.
  • Can you find images? web-sites? What else?
  • Do you see how you can collect and organize your research?
  • Don’t forget all those tips: save, cite, links, etc.
  • No luck?
    • Try different search terms.
    • Try different databases.
    • Try Advanced Search.
next the web let s talk about the surface web vs the deep web
Next … the Web. Let’s talk about the surface web vs the deep web
  • Deep Web: Regulated information embedded within databases, e.g., ProQuest – password protected and paid subscription. They will save you time and give you high quality information.
  • Surface Web: Free unregulated information easily accessible by all search engines
let s look @ the shallow unregulated web
Let’s look @ the shallow unregulated web

Can you trust the web resource?

  • Don’t forget – anyone can publish on the web.
  • What should you look for?
      • Authority
      • Objectivity
      • Accuracy
authority
Authority
  • Ask questions:
    • What is the purpose of the webpage?
    • Who is the author?
    • Is the person or organization an expert? Look closely at the URL: gcgovedu
      • Is it an official web site or a personal web page?
objectivity
Objectivity
  • Is the site intended for a particular audience?
  • Does the site contain advertising or does it have sponsorship?
  • Again … what\'s the purpose of the site?
  • If there is an issue, are both sides presented?
accuracy
Accuracy
  • Currency - is the work up-to-date?
  • Are there errors or typos?
  • Do hyperlinks work?
  • Is the site easy to navigate?
why not wikipedia
Why not Wikipedia?
  • Michael Scott on Wikipedia
  • You are doing scholarly work and need to be sure you’re using high quality resources
  • Wikipedia …
    • can be factual but it’s not necessarily reliable
    • can be out of date
    • can be wrong: no peer review
    • Wikipedia has a disclaimer that notes:

WIKIPEDIA MAKES NO GUARANTEE OF VALIDITY

science search engines
Science search engines
  • Instead of Google, try science-focused search engines.  Remember … these still require good website evaluation skills:
  • Infomine
  • Intute
  • Scirus
  • SciNet
your turn
Your turn
  • Keeping in mind all you’ve learned about searching the web, with your partner, find a credible web-based resource for your project.
  • Share your website with the rest of the group. Why do you think it’s a good source?
other useful web resources
Other useful web resources
  • Discovery Education Science Fair guide http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/
  • Ontario Science Centre http://www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/resources/sciencefairlinks.asp
  • Science Buddies http://www.sciencebuddies.org/index_A.htm
  • Mad Sci Network http://www.madsci.org/
  • Scitablehttp://www.nature.com/scitable
web directories
Web directories
  • Directories can be useful:
    • ipl2 The Internet Public Library (a great resource)
    • Yahoo! Directory
how do i cite sources
How do I cite sources?
  • Make sure you write down all your sources as you find them!
  • The databases in Towers Library can give you the citations for the sources you\'ve used.
  • Don’t forget you also need to cite images.
  • Use an online guide, e.g., APA
  • A simple and useful way of building your references is www.bibme.org or http://www.easybib.com/
reference page citing a web page
Reference page: Citing a web page
  • Discovery Education. (2011).Science Fair Central: Getting Started. USA. Retrieved November 20, 2011, from http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Getting-Started.html.
reference page citing an image
Reference page: Citing an image

Science Photo Library. (2011). Bread Mold. Photograph courtesy Dr. Jeremy Burgess. Retrieved November 20, 2011, from http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/14359/view

reference page citing from an online database
Reference page: citing from an online database

Li, X. (2010). Umami taste receptor. InAccessScience. Retrieved from http://www.accessscience.com/content.aspx?id=YB100222

bibliography
Bibliography

Discovery Education. (2011).Science Fair Central: Getting Started. USA. Retrieved November 20, 2011, from http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/Getting-Started.html.

Li, X. (2010). Umami taste receptor. InAccessScience. Retrieved from http://www.accessscience.com/content.aspx?id=YB100222

Science Photo Library. (2011). Bread Mold. Photograph courtesy Dr. Jeremy Burgess. Retrieved November 20, 2011, from http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/14359/view

and don t forget
And don’t forget …
  • You can join the Aurora Public Library if you live in Aurora – including if you live at the School.
  • Or join your local public library.
finally
Finally …
  • If you need help … come and see us in the library.
  • Good luck with your project!
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