Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all
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Differentiating Instruction One Size Doesn’t Fit All. Contents: Tiered instruction Anchor Activities Learning Contracts Cubing. www.loudoncounty.org/ourpages/auto/2007/8/7/1186503506976/October%20 Differentiation %20In-Service.ppt. One Size?.

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Differentiating Instruction One Size Doesn’t Fit All

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Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Differentiating InstructionOne Size Doesn’t Fit All

Contents:

Tiered instruction

Anchor Activities

Learning Contracts

Cubing

www.loudoncounty.org/ourpages/auto/2007/8/7/1186503506976/October%20Differentiation%20In-Service.ppt


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

One Size?


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

“The fact that students differ may be inconvenient, but it is inescapable. Adapting to that diversity is the inevitable price of productivity, high standards, and fairness to kids.”

  • Theodore Sizer, Brown University


Howard gardner

The biggest mistake of past centuries in teaching has been to treat all children as if they were variants of the same individual and thus to feel justified in teaching them all in the same way.

-- Howard Gardner


Addressing diverse learner needs

1. Describe one or two students you teach who have unique learning needs.

2. What would those learners need in their classes to make it a great year?

Addressing Diverse Learner Needs


Differentiation is

Differentiation is...

...the recognition of and commitment to plan for student differences. A differentiated classroom provides different avenues to acquire content, to process or make sense of information and ideas, and to develop products.


The goals

The Goals...

... of a differentiated classroom are to maximize student growth and to promote individual student success.


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

What are we doing now?


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Our brightest are marching in place!


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Brain Research


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Brain Research


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Brain Research


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Brain Research


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

This doesn’t work…


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

When to Differentiate


Some basic principles

Some Basic Principles

  • We differentiate instruction when we use a variety of instructional techniques that enable us to meet the diverse learning needs of our students.

  • It is not the cumbersome technique of individualization.

  • It can be thought of as grouped individualization.


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Some Basic Principles


Some basic principles1

Some Basic Principles

  • Differentiation can be done by readiness, interest, or learning styles

  • Rome wasn’t built in a day. Begin with areas with which you are the most comfortable.


Differentiation is1

Differentiation is…

  • Providing multiple assignments within each unit, tailored for students of different levels of readiness, interest, and/or learning style

  • Having high expectations for all students. Aim high and differentiate down as necessary.


Differentiation is2

Differentiation is…

  • Permitting students to opt out of material they can demonstrate they know and to progress at their own pace through new material.

  • Structuring the class assignments so they require high levels of critical thinking but permit a range of responses.


Differentiation is3

Differentiation is…

  • Allowing students to choose, with the teacher’s guidance, ways to learn and to demonstrate what they have learned.

  • Providing students with opportunities to explore topics in which they have strong interest and find personal meaning.


Differentiation is4

Differentiation is…

  • Implementing flexible grouping strategies that cluster students by achievement in a particular subject area, interest, learning style, personal choice, and/or ability.


Differentiation is5

Differentiation is…

  • Flexible. Teachers may move students in and out of groups after assessing students’ instructional needs.


Differentiation isn t

Differentiation isn’t...

  • Individualization. It isn’t a different lesson plan for each student each day.

  • Giving all students the same work most of the time, even in achievement or ability grouped classes.


Differentiation isn t1

Differentiation isn’t...

  • Assigning more math problems or more reading at the same level to high achieving students.

  • Focussing on student weaknesses and ignoring student strengths.


Differentiation isn t2

Differentiation isn’t…

  • Requiring students to teach material that they have already mastered to others who have not yet obtained mastery.

  • Cooperative learning delivered in rigidly grouped formats, lacks individual accountability, and/or focuses on work that isn’t new to all of the students.


Differentiation isn t3

Differentiation isn’t…

  • Depending solely upon the differences in student response to whole class assignments to provide differentiation.

  • Limited to acceleration. Teachers need to able to use a variety of strategies to meet student needs.


Assessment is crucial to success

Assessment is Crucial to Success

  • Assessments should be planned prior to instruction – not an add on!

  • Assessment is ongoing and diagnostic.

  • Readiness levels are identified and lessons are planned accordingly.

  • Students use assessment data to evaluate their own learning.


Most importantly

Most Importantly…

  • Assessment ALWAYS has more to do with helping students grow rather than recording their mistakes and failures!


Assess in many ways for many reasons

Assess in many ways for many reasons…

  • Pre-assessment necessary for effective planning

  • On-going assessment to determine effects of instruction and next steps for the student

  • Assessment to evaluate student achievement

  • Self-Assessment to help students see personal strengths and areas of need


Instructional strategies

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Tiered Instruction


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Tiered Instruction

Tiered Instruction


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Tiered Instruction


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Tiered Instruction


A simple tiered activity grade k counting skill

A simple tiered activity Grade K: Counting (skill)

  • Task 1Find a way to count and show how many people are in our class today.

    • How did you get your answer?

  • Task 2Find a way to show how many people are in our class.

    • How many are absent today?

    • How many are here today?

    • How do you know?

  • Task 3Find a way to show how many boys are in our class today.

    • How many boys are absent today?

    • How many girls are here today?

    • How many girls are absent today?

    • Prove you are right.

      From Carol Tomlinson


Whole group activities

Whole Group Activities

  • The teacher will read portions from Arctic Memories while showing the pictures.

  • Whole class discussion questions:

    • What does Inuit mean? (The people)

    • How is the land and weather in Grosse Pointe the same as in Arctic Memories? How is it different?

    • What did the Inuit people do for food? Shelter? How do they travel?

    • What do the parents do for jobs? What do your parents do?


Tiered activity groups

Tiered Activity Groups

  • Group A: Find the Arctic Region on a map or globe or use the computer. Draw a series of pictures and write captions to:

    • Show where the Arctic regions are. Does the place on the map effect the weather?

    • How does the weather effect the way of life?

    • What might happen if there was a big weather change?

    • What themes do you see in the art over and over? How might the art themes change if the weather changed?


Tiered activity groups1

Tiered Activity Groups

  • Group B:

  • Draw a Grosse Pointe family activity and an Inuit family activity. In the pictures show one way that an Inuit family is similar to a Grosse Pointe family and one way that it is different.

  • Go to the computer and use Write Along to make your own captions for your pictures. Print them and past them onto the pictures.


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • All students explain their pictures and captions to either the whole class or a mixed group.

  • Pictures could be bound to make a class book.


Instructional strategies1

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Differentiated learning contracts key skills graphing and measuring key concepts relative sizes

Find a friend and

do Board math with

problems 1 -10 on

Come to the Red math

page 71 of your

workshop on Monday

math book.

and Tuesday

remember the "no

more than four"

rule.

Design an animal on

graph paper using

Solve the great graph

the creature

mystery in your math

blueprint. Get your

folder. Check your

graph approved.

answers with a buddy

Then make a

first, then with the

drawing, painting or

teacher.

model of it.

Work at the

Use the dominoes

measuring and

to solve the

graphing center

problems in your

until you complete

folder. Draw then

the red work.

write your answers.

Grade 3 Math Contract : Below Grade Level

Differentiated Learning ContractsKey skills: Graphing and MeasuringKey Concepts: Relative Sizes

  • Read: How Big is a Foot?

  • Apply: Work with a friend to graph the size of at least 6 things on the list of “ten terrific things.” Label each thing with how you know.

  • Extend: Make a group story – or one of your own – that uses measurement and at least one graph. Turn it into a book at the authors’ center.


Differentiated learning contracts key skills graphing and measuring key concepts relative sizes1

Measure your height,

the height of a friend

Come to the green math

and the height of

workshop on Monday and

your teacher. Graph

Friday

their relative sizes

on a graph board.

Label them and give

them a personality.

Work the even numbered

Complete and graph the

problems on p. 71 of your

domino multiplication

bath book. Use the

challenge. Record your

expert of the day to

answers on the wall chart.

Main Idea

check your work.

Work the

Solve the great graph

measuring and

mystery in your

graphing center

folder. You can work

until you complete

with someone on the

the green work

green team if you

there.

like. Check your

answer with the

teacher.

Grade 3 Math Contract : On Grade Level

Differentiated Learning ContractsKey skills: Graphing and MeasuringKey Concepts: Relative Sizes

  • Read: Alexander who Used to be Rich or Ten Kids, No Pets

  • Think: Complete the math madness book which goes with the story you read.

  • Extend*: Now, make a math madness book based on your story about kids and pets or money that comes and goes. Directions are at the authors’ center.

    *You can propose an extension of your own.


Differentiated learning contracts key skills graphing and measuring key concepts relative sizes2

Find a place in the

school of which you

Come to the blue math

could make a pattern

workshop on Tuesday or

graph. Make the

Thursday.

graph and create 3

problems for a

classmate to solve.

Complete the extension

Do a timed test of two-

problems on p. 74 of your

digit multiplication. Use a

bath book. Use the peer

peer monitor.

monitor to check your

Main Idea

work.

Work the

Solve the great graph

measuring and

mystery in your

graphing center

folder. You can work

until you complete

with someone on the

the blue work

blue team if you like.

there.

Check your answer

with the teacher.

Grade 3 Math Contract : Advanced Level

Differentiated Learning ContractsKey skills: Graphing and MeasuringKey Concepts: Relative Sizes

  • Read: Dinosaurs Before Dark or Airport Control

  • Apply: Research a kind of dinosaur or airplane. Figure out how big it is. Graph its size compared to yours on graph paper or on the blacktop outside our room. Label it by name and size.

  • Extend: Make a book in which you combine math and dinosaurs or airplanes or something else big. It can be a number fact book, a counting book, or a problem book. Instructions are at the author's center.


Poetry contract

Poetry Contract


Poetry contract1

Poetry Contract


Instructional strategies2

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Anchor Activities


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Anchor Activities


Instructional strategies3

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Adjusted questions varying journal prompts

Adjusted Questions: Varying Journal Prompts

  • Why did Max go to visit the wild things? Do you think that was a good or bad idea? Why did he decide to come home? Was that a good or bad idea? Why do you say so?

  • If you were Max’s Mom or Dad, write about what you would think when he went to his room, when he went where the wild things were, when he came home?


Adjusted questions varying journal prompts1

Adjusted Questions: Varying Journal Prompts

  • Max sometimes talks to himself. Tell us what he says when he goes to his room, goes through his visit to the wild things, decides to come home and gets back to his room. What do he and his parents say the next morning?

  • What does it really mean to go where the wild things are? Tell a story about a time when that happened to you or a friend. Tell enough so we can see how the two stories are alike or different.


Instructional strategies4

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Compacting

Compacting

  • Students take a simple pre-assessment.

    • Quiz

    • K-W-L

    • Do a web with the key concept as the main idea

    • Tell the teacher what they know about the topic

  • The teacher develops an alternate assignment with the student

  • Teacher and student put the alternative in contract form


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Instructional Strategies

  • tiered activities and/or products

  • learning contracts

  • anchor activities

  • adjusted questions

  • compacting

  • cubing


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Cubing

Offer a different task at varying degrees of difficulty on each side of the cube.

or...


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Provide activities dealing with the same topic at tiered degrees of difficulty by cube OR by learning style (kinesthetic, visual, oral).

Cubing

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

http://www.teach.virginia.edu/files/nagc_cubing__think_dots.pdf


Outcomes observed by elementary school teachers

Outcomes Observed by Elementary School Teachers

  • Greater understanding of the concepts

  • All students experience challenge

  • Ability to apply concepts/skills to new situations and daily life

  • Students are excited

  • Students have ownership

  • Students are more independent learners


Outcomes

Outcomes

  • Students have more evaluative skills

  • Students have more metacognitive skills

  • Students have greater mastery of content

  • Students have problem solving skills

  • Students are able to initiate their own projects.


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Things to look for:

  • Hands-on projects

  • Rubrics

  • Learning contracts

  • Student Choice

  • The way to the end is not always the same for every student.

  • Flexible Grouping


Differentiating instruction one size doesn t fit all

Wise Words…


Final thoughts

Final Thoughts

  • Teachers moving toward differentiated instruction in an inclusive, integrated classroom find greater success if they

  • (1) have a clear rationale for differentiation

  • (2) prepare students and parents for a differentiated classroom

  • (3) attend to issues of classroom structure and management as they move toward more student-centered learning

  • (4) move toward differentiation at a pace comfortable to both teacher and learners

  • (5) plan with team members and other colleagues interested in differentiation (Tomlinson, 1995b).


Questions

Questions?

Contact:

Chantal Cravens

[email protected]

626-575-2331 X2532


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