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Impact on Student Learning: A Comparison of International and Domestic Undergraduate Research Experiences. ASEE International Forum Indianapolis, IN June 14, 2014 Cheryl Matherly, the University of Tulsa Shane Curtis, The University of Tulsa Sarah Phillips, Rice University

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Impact on Student Learning: A Comparison of International and Domestic Undergraduate Research Experiences

ASEE International Forum

Indianapolis, IN

June 14, 2014

Cheryl Matherly, the University of Tulsa

Shane Curtis, The University of Tulsa

Sarah Phillips, Rice University

Junichiro kono, rice university

slide2
Are international programs for STEM students effective in preparing students to participate in international research collaboration?
intercultural maturity
Intercultural Maturity

King, P. & Baxter Magolda, M. “A developmental model of intercultural maturity,” Journal of College Student Development, 46, 6, 71-592, (2005).

nanojapan international research experience for undergraduates
To cultivate an interest in nanotechnology as a field of study among college students

To cultivate the next generation of graduate students in nanotechnology

To add to the skill set of active nanoscienceresearchers

To create students who are internationally savvy and have a specific interest in and knowledge of Japan;

To educate students in culture, language and technology, in order that they may be more effective when addressing global scientific problems

NanoJapan: International Research Experience for Undergraduates
nanojapan international experience for undergraduates
NanoJapan International Experience for Undergraduates
  • 12 first and second year science and engineering majors (no prior research experience)
  • 8 week research internships in the multidisciplinary field of nanoscienceat leading Japanese laboratories
    • Japanese & U.S. PIRE co-advisor
    • Japanese graduate student mentor (Reverse NJ)
  • 3 Week Orientation Program in Tokyo
    • 45 hours of intensive Japanese language
    • Intro to Nanoscience Seminar
    • Intro to Japanese Culture & Society Seminar
  • Re-entry program at Rice focused on career goals
  • RQI Annual Summer Research Colloquium at the end of the summer.
rice quantum institute research experience for undergraduates
To acquire the capability of reading and understanding advanced scientific publications,

To understand and experience how to bring a research project to a successful completion,

To be able to successfully present their work to an audience,

To understand principles for ethical and responsible research.

Rice Quantum Institute Research Experience for Undergraduates
rice quantum institute research experience for undergraduates1
Rice Quantum Institute Research Experience for Undergraduates

Undergraduate students in the physical sciences (typically sophomore & junior students)

8-10 week research internships based at Rice University

Complete research on fundamental research projects on quantum phenomena in physical, chemical, and biological systems under the advisement of RQI faculty fellows.

Special seminars and group discussions for REU participants

RQI Annual Summer Research Colloquium at the end of the summer.

methods
Methods
  • Georgia Tech International Internship Survey administered as pre and post test for NanoJapan and RQI students
    • Self-assessment of knowledge, skills, abilities on measure of importance and preparation
    • Self-assessment of workplace skills
    • Career plans
  • Mapped GTII items into measures of cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal development, using King and Baxter Magolda’s definitions for each dimension
results cognitive development
Results: Cognitive Development
  • Cognitive development: The ways in which individuals approach and evaluate intercultural knowledge, and how that knowledge is acquired and applied
    • NanoJapanstudentsrated their preparation at the beginning of the summer lower than the RQI students and reported greater positive change in their perceived ability to approach and evaluate intercultural knowledge at the end of the summer than the RQI participants.

NanoJapan: PreM = 2.82, SD = .57, PostM = 3.53, SD = .86 RQI: PreM = 3.35, SD = .81, PostM = 3.53, SD = .86

results intrapersonal development
Results: Intrapersonal Development
  • Intrapersonal development: measures of self-awareness and a tolerance and interest in diversity
    • The difference between pre- and post-program test scores was not significant, nor was there any correlation between the program and the change in scores.

NanoJapan: PreM = 3.20, SD = .53, PostM = 3.37, SD = .49 RQI: PreM = 2.43, SD = .84, PostM = 2.38, SD = .65.

interpersonal development
Interpersonal Development

Characterized by a heightened awareness and capacity to engage in intercultural interactions that are interdependent, respectful, and informed by cultural understanding

NanoJapan: PreM = 3.07 SD = .84, PostM = 4.18, SD = .53 RQI: PreM = 3.58, SD = .37, PostM = 3.81, SD = .57.

interpersonal development cont
Interpersonal Development (cont.)
  • The RQI students scored higher than the NanoJapan students on the pre-program test
  • Both groups reported gains on post-program test scores, but those for the NanoJapan students were greater such that these students reported higher post-test scores than their RQI counterparts
  • Suggests that the NanoJapan students experienced greater gains on interpersonal development as compared with the RQI students
results technical skills
Results: Technical Skills
  • Technical Skills: Ability to successfully design and conduct research within student’s discipline
    • Both groups perceived that they made gains with regard to skills associated with technical aspects of their respective disciplines
    • For both the NanoJapan IREU and RQI REU groups, the post-program test scores were higher than the pre-program test scores.

NanoJapan: PreM= 3.22, SD=.82; PostM = 3.77, SD = .71 RQI: PreM = 3.74, SD = .62; PostM = 3.94, SD = .49

conclusions
Conclusions

Intrapersonal dimension was the least robust

On the cognitive dimension, the rate of perceived gains as expressed by NanoJapan students were greater than the RQI students

A response to personal challenge?

The international dimension of the REU may be a catalyst for development of this dimension of intercultural maturity.

conclusions cont
Conclusions (cont.)

On the interpersonal dimension, NanoJapan students indicated accelerated gains such that they rated themselves as better prepared than the RQI students at the end of the summer.

Increased self-confidence from the challenge of being abroad?

Impact of NanoJapancurriculum and intercultural reflections?

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Implications: The international experience, as distinct from the domestic REU, did impact students’ self-assessment on measures of intercultural maturity

thank you
Thank you

We would like to acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant Nos. OISE-0530220 and OISE-0968405 as well as the contributions of the PIRE team members to the NanoJapan Program, including Keiko Packard, Prof. Mitsuaki Shimojo, Prof. Jonathan Bird, and Prof. Christopher Stanton.

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