Bus 393 introduction to commercial law resources
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BUS 393 Introduction to Commercial Law Resources. at Simon Fraser University Library Yolanda Koscielski, Liaison Librarian for Criminology, Computing Science and Engineering October 2009. Main Topics: How to. 1. Look up the definitions of legal terms

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BUS 393 Introduction to Commercial Law Resources

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Bus 393 introduction to commercial law resources

BUS 393 Introduction to Commercial Law Resources

at

Simon Fraser University Library

Yolanda Koscielski, Liaison Librarian for Criminology,

Computing Science and Engineering

October 2009


Main topics how to

Main Topics: How to

  • 1. Look up the definitions of legal terms

  • 2. Find textbooks or commentaries (by lawyers and other writers) on your topic

  • 3. Find laws and regulations

  • 4. Find law cases on your topic

  • 5. Track down a legal case using a citation.


First steps sfu library website

First Steps:SFU Library Website

The library’s home page: www.lib.sfu.ca

Click on “Browse research guides”


Bus 393 introduction to commercial law resources

Click on Business Administration,

-then on Bus Admin Area

-then on Commercial Law


Commercial law research guide @ sfu library

Commercial Law Research Guide @ SFU Library


1 how to look up the definitions of legal terms

1. How to: look up the definitions of legal terms?

The Dictionary of Canadian Law

[KE 183 D852 2004]

Canadian Law Dictionary

[KE 183 Y63 1998]


2 how to find textbooks or commentaries by lawyers and other writers on your topic

2. How to: find textbooks or commentaries by lawyers and other writers on your topic?

  • Index to Canadian Legal Literature (Available via LawSource)

  • Canadian Business Law Journal

    (Available via CBCA Complete)

  • SFU Library Catalogue

  • Canada Corporations Law Reporter (Bennett Library Reference: HD 2808 C343)


Index to canadian legal literature available via lawsource

Index to Canadian Legal Literature (Available via LawSource)


Canadian business law journal available via cbca

Canadian Business Law Journal(Available via CBCA)


Sfu library catalogue

SFU Library Catalogue


Canada corporations law reporter corporate brief

Canada Corporations Law Reporter + Corporate Brief


3 how to find the text of laws and regulations

3. How to: find the text of laws and regulations?

  • For BC laws, the most up-to-date source is QP Legalese (or BC Laws)

  • For BC & other jurisdictions in Canada, use LawSource

  • For BC & other jurisdictions in Canada, use LexisNexis

  • Free public websites


Qp legalese

QP Legalese


Lawsource

LawSource


Free public websites

Free public websites

  • Consolidated Acts and regulations

    of Canada http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/

  • BC Laws http://www.bclaws.ca/


Free public websites1

Free public websites

  • Canadian Legal Information Institute

    http://www.canlii.org/


4 how to find law cases on your topic

4. How to: find law cases on your topic?

  • Use the Canadian Encyclopedic Digest (CED)The CED will always point you to major cases which have established the legal points in question. The CED is available electronically through LawSource.

  • Use the Canadian Abridgement. This is yet another resource which we have available online through LawSource.


Ced cad in lawsource

CED/CAD in Lawsource

  • Use the Canadian Encyclopedic Digest (CED)The CED will always point you to major cases which have established the legal points in question. The CED is available electronically through LawSource.

  • Use the Canadian Abridgement. This is yet another resource which we have available online through LawSource.


How to find law cases on your topic

How to: find law cases on your topic?

  • Do a keyword search in a database of Canadian magazine and newspaper articles. This is useful for finding prominent cases which have been covered in the media.

  • Recommended databases:

    CBCA Fulltext Business

    Canadian NewsStand


How to find law cases on your topic1

How to: find law cases on your topic?

  • Look at your course textbook. Frequently your textbook will refer to major cases in discussing the law on your topic.

  • Use the secondary literature. An article on your topic will almost always refer you to specific relevant cases.


5 i ve got the citation to a specific case how can i get the judgment

5. I've got the citation to a specific case. How can I get the judgment?

  • Once you have the citation to a specific case you can try to locate the judgment. However, even just understanding the citation can be a challenge.

    Wells v. Newfoundland (1997), 156 Nfld. & P.E.I.R. 271, 483 A.P.R. 271, 5 Admin. L.R. (3d) 113, 156 Nfld. & P.E.I.R. 271, NLCA


Case citation

Case Citation

  • This report can be found in the 69th volume of the Dominion Law Reports on page 433

  • The "2nd" tells you that the DLR has been published in multiple series; the second series was 1956-68

  • SCBC indicates this was a Supreme Court of British Columbia decision


Case citation1

Case Citation

  • This seems rather complicated, and it is, but fortunately LawSource makes it easy. From the homepage, where it says: Case, you can type in the names of the parties involved.

  • Ex: Wells v. Newfoundland (1997), 156 Nfld. & P.E.I.R. 271, 483 A.P.R. 271, 5 Admin. L.R. (3d) 113, 156 Nfld. & P.E.I.R. 271, NLCA


Interpreting lawsource symbols

Interpreting LawSource symbols

  • A red flagwarns you that the case may not be good law, indicating that the decision has been reversed, or has not been followed within the same jurisdiction or by the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • A yellow flagwarns that the decision has some negative history or treatment, but has not been reversed or overruled.

  • Note: If a decision has a red or yellow flag, any decision lower than it in the direct history chain will also have a status flag at least as severe assigned to it.


Sources for us legal information

Sources for US Legal Information

  • Cases:

    • LexisNexis (US)

  • Secondary Legal Literature:

    • Books in library catalogue—may give your legal topic (e.g., contracts) a comparative treatment

    • LexisNexis: (US and other international)

    • HeinOnline: Law Journal Library: international and non-U.S. law journals


Main topics how to1

Main Topics: How to

  • 1. Look up the definitions of legal terms

  • 2. Find textbooks or commentaries (by lawyers and other writers) on your topic

  • 3. Find laws and regulations

  • 4. Find law cases on your topic

  • 5. Track down a legal case using a citation.


Reference research assistance

Reference & Research Assistance

  • In-person

  • Telephone

  • E-mail

  • Virtual Ask Us Now Reference Service


  • Login