Leopardus pardalis by natalie romine
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Leopardus pardalis By: Natalie Romine. Ocelot. Animal Description. Twice the size of average house cat (3-4 ft. in length) Fine fur Nocturnal Eats rabbits, frogs, iguanas, fish, and rodents Biggest predators are Jaguars, Pumas, Harpy Eagles, and the Anaconda Top speed: 38 mph

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Leopardus pardalis by natalie romine

Leoparduspardalis

By: Natalie Romine

Ocelot


Animal description
Animal Description

  • Twice the size of average house cat (3-4 ft. in length)

  • Fine fur

  • Nocturnal

  • Eats rabbits, frogs, iguanas, fish, and rodents

  • Biggest predators are Jaguars, Pumas, Harpy Eagles, and the Anaconda

  • Top speed: 38 mph

  • Life span: 8-12 years


Where is it found
Where is it found?

  • Rain forests of South America

  • Can be found as far north as Texas

Ocelot range is bright yellow


Why are they endangered
Why are they endangered?

  • Hunted for fur

  • Habitat loss

    • Deforestation

    • Nearly became extinct in 1960-1980 because they were hunted for their fur


Population
Population

  • 800,000


Why is the ocelot important
Why is the Ocelot important?

  • The Ocelot balances out the environment by keeping down the numbers of its prey because if they become extinct, its prey will thrive creating less food for them to eat, which means more of their prey will die, become pests, and/or spread diseases.


What is being done
What is being done?

  • Various Charities

    • WildEarth Guardians

      • January 2010 - WildEarth Guardians submits Administrative Procedure Act petition to delegate critical habitat for the ocelot

      • February 2010 - WildEarth Guardians remarks on the Laguna Atascosa Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

      • August 2010 - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service releases a revised recovery plan for the ocelot

      • October 2010 - WildEarth Guardians comments on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife revised ocelot recovery plan

      • May 2011 - U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service rejects petition to designate critical habitat for the ocelot


What else can be done
What else can be done?

  • Donate to WildEarth

  • Education

  • Become a member of a charity/organization


Current efforts
Current Efforts

  • Current efforts have been successful at raising awareness for the Ocelots

    • Dr. Jan Janecka wrote a research paper and collaborated between the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute and the US Fish and Wildlife Service to help raise awareness of the endangered species.


Citations
Citations

  • Ocelot - WildEarth Guardians. (n.d.).WildEarth Guardians. Retrieved January 30, 2014, from http://www.wildearthguardians.org/site/PageServer?pagename=species_mammals_ocelot#.Uu1pcfldW5I

  • Ocelot. (n.d.). National Geographic. Retrieved January 31, 2014, from http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/ocelot/

  • Ocelot. (n.d.). (Leoparduspardalis). Retrieved January 31, 2014, from http://a-z-animals.com/animals/ocelot/

  • Ocelot Pictorial. (n.d.). Ocelot Pictorial. Retrieved February 1, 2014, from http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9836371/1

  • Janecka’s Efforts to Save the Ocelot Population in Texas. (n.d.). Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. Retrieved February 1, 2014, from http://vetmed.tamu.edu/research/highlights/janecka%E2%80%99s-efforts-to-save-the-ocelot-population-in-texas/#.Uu7B4PldW5I