Biomass fundamentals modules 19 higher order functionality in biomass surface active materials
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Biomass Fundamentals Modules 19 : Higher Order Functionality in Biomass: Surface Active Materials. A capstone course for BioSUCCEED : Bio products S ustainability: a U niversity C ooperative C enter of E xcellence in ED ucation.

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Biomass fundamentals modules 19 higher order functionality in biomass surface active materials

Biomass FundamentalsModules 19: Higher Order Functionality in Biomass:Surface Active Materials

A capstone course for

BioSUCCEED:

BioproductsSustainability: a University Cooperative Center of Excellence in EDucation

The USDA Higher Education Challenge Grants program gratefully acknowledged for support


This course would not be possible without support from

This course would not be possible without support from:

USDA

Higher Education Challenge (HEC) Grants Program

www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/rfas/hep_challenge.html


Article of interest for discussion
Article of Interest for Discussion

  • “Comparison of the Leakage of Carboxyfluorescein from Symmetric and Asymmetric-Acyl Chain Phospatidylcholine Vesicles” – Wiedmann, Timothy S.; Salmon, A.; Perkins, Walter R. Pharm. Res.1993, 10, 147-151.

  • http://springer.metapress.com/content/jm857702236gu462/fulltext.pdf


Building blocks for containers amphiphiles
Building blocks for containers: amphiphiles

Surfactant Tail

Surfactant Head

Surfactant Monomers

Micelle


Structure of a vesicle
Structure of a Vesicle

  • Amphiphiles used to make it

  • Grossly – bilayer structure versus micelle

  • Unilamellar sphere (SLV) vs MLV (multilamellar)

  • Hydrophilic core & bulk

  • Sandwich is hydrophobic


Vesicles as containers
Vesicles as containers

  • Modify them by employing amphiphiles that moderate permeability

  • Use symmetric & asymmetric amphiphiles

  • Make mixed chain, partial interdigitated bilayer




Dsc profiles for vesicles multilamellar
DSC profiles for vesicles (multilamellar)

Multilamellar dispersions

  • High sensitivity DSC

  • 20/hr scan rate

  • Gel-to-liquid crystalline transitions different

  • Mean diameters = 22090 nm & 210 85 nm for 16/16 PC & 20/12/ PC, respectively

Extruded dispersions

20/12 PC

16/16 PC


Time dependence of guest release
Time dependence of guest release

  • Leakiness originates from gel-to-liquid transitions

  • Carboxyfluorescein is the guest molecule

  • In the 16/16 PC (circles), there is more release than 20/12 PC (squares)

42C

48C


Release of guest carboxyfluorescein as a function of temperature
Release of guest (carboxyfluorescein) as a function of temperature

  • In 20/12 PC, there is little correlation between % release and temperature (closed circles)

  • In 16/16 PC, there is definite dependency on T


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