Nanotechnology and the developing world
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Nanotechnology and the Developing World. Peter A. Singer McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health Program in the Life Sciences, Ethics, and Policy University Health Network and University of Toronto. Greatest ethical challenge of our time. United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

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Nanotechnology and the developing world

Nanotechnology and the Developing World

Peter A. Singer

McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health

Program in the Life Sciences, Ethics, and Policy

University Health Network and

University of Toronto


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Greatest ethical challenge of our time


United nations millennium development goals

United NationsMillennium Development Goals

  • Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

  • Achieve universal primary education

  • Promote gender equality and empower women

  • Reduce child mortality

  • Improve maternal health

  • Combat HIV / AIDS, malaria, and other diseases

  • Ensure environmental sustainability

  • Develop a global partnership for development


Nanotechnology and the developing world

The Millennium Development Goals

cannot be achieved

without a focused policy for science, technology and innovation


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Which nanotechnologies are most likely to benefit people in developing countries?


Nanotechnology and the developing world

UNITED KINGDOM

IRELAND

GERMANY

CANADA

CHINA

SWITZERLAND

FRANCE

UNITED

STATES

TURKEY

JAPAN

ITALY

SPAIN

ISRAEL

GREECE

SOUTH KOREA

MEXICO

CUBA

INDIA

PHILIPPINES

BRASIL

VIETNAM

THAILAND

SOUTH AFRICA

CHILE

ARGENTINA

NEW ZEALAND

♀13

♂50

63 panelists in 26 countries


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Top 10 nanotechnologies for the developing world

  • Energy storage, production and conversion

  • Agricultural productivity enhancement

  • Water treatment and remediation

  • Disease diagnosis and screening

  • Drug delivery systems

  • Food processing and storage

  • Air pollution remediation

  • Construction

  • Health monitoring

  • Vector and pest detection and control

PLoS Med 2006; 2(5): e97


Nanotechnology and the developing world

IV

V

Improve maternal health

Reduce child mortality

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

VII

VI

Ensure environmental

sustainability

Combat HIV / AIDS, malaria,

and other diseases

I

Eradicate extreme poverty

and hunger

Top 10 nanotechnologies vs.

Millennium Development Goals


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Dendrimers

Quantum dots

Buckyballs

Lab on a chip


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Quantum

dots

for malaria


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Decreasing infrastructure requirement of

malaria diagnostic tests saves most lives

Rafael ME et al. Nature 2006; 444, 39-48


Domestic innovation needed in developing world

Strong and sustained political will

Individual leadership

Close linkages, active knowledge flow

Focused efforts in niche areas

Temporarily permissive IP environment for initial capacity building

Private sector development

Domestic innovation needed in developing world


Nanotechnology and the developing world

Examples of nanotechnology innovation in the developing world

  • Nanodiagnostic systems for HIV, H-B, syphilis, pregnancy (Nano Biotech Ltd.)

  • Nano drug delivery systems for cancer and for local delivery to eye and skin (CISR, U. Delhi, Dabur Research Foundation, Panacea Biotec)

Nano bone (Tsinghua University)

MEXICO

  • Nanomagnets as drug transporters

  • Carbon nanotubes for implants, prostheses, and biosensors

SOUTH KOREA

Polymer nanocomposites for controlled drug release, nanoscaffolds, and dental materials

CHINA

INDIA

PHILIPPINES

THAILAND

  • Front runners

  • Middle ground

  • Up-and-comers

BRASIL

SOUTH AFRICA

ARGENTINA

CHILE

Court E. et al. Nanotechnology 15, 3 (2004)


Thank you

Thank You

Dr. Fabio

Salamanca-

Buentello

Additional funding partners listed at www.geneticsethics.net


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