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Adventure Diversion Program. Designated as a Best Practice for the Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders by the Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention. How it all began …October 2005. COMMUNITY COLLABORATION. Collaboration 101 – Finding the Right Partners.

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Adventure diversion program

Adventure Diversion Program

Designated as a Best Practice

for the Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders by the Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention


How it all began october 2005
How it all began…October 2005

COMMUNITY

COLLABORATION


Collaboration 101 finding the right partners
Collaboration101– Finding the Right Partners

  • Carroll County Youth Service Bureau

  • Carroll County Department of Juvenile Services

  • Carroll County Local Management Board


Collaboration 102 finding supportive community stakeholders
Collaboration 102–Finding Supportive Community Stakeholders

  • Boy Scouts of America Venturing Crews - youth working together on a common interest/goal – we operate as Crew #394 which provides access to liability insurance, facilities, etc…

  • Gateway School – provided facility in-kind for the first year of the program.

  • Maryland Cooperative Extension, Carroll County Office (aka “Agricultural Center”) – provided facilityuse, equipment, and resources 2007-09.

  • Hashawha Environmental Center – provide access to nature sanctuary and local hiking trails.


Adventure diversion program an alternative intervention to placement
Adventure Diversion Program:An alternative intervention to placement.

  • A mandatory supervised “evening reporting center” for DJS youth that operates 3 evenings/week and

    1 Saturday/month (with transportation support provided).

  • Serving both male and female youth ages 14-17.

  • Youth referred present with a range of offenses:

    • MDOP

    • Assault

    • 2nd Degree Assault

    • Deadly Weapon in School

    • CDS Possession

    • Felony Theft/Burglary and Theft


Target population
Target Population:

  • Court-ordered youth at risk of being detained or placed out of home.

  • Court-ordered youth returning from out of home facilities (e.g., detention, shelter, RTC, group home).

    Added FY’09:

  • Court-ordered youth at risk of violating probation due to increasing high risk behaviors.

    Added FY’10:

  • Pre-Court Level II status youth with a history of two or more contacts with DJS.


Comparing costs detention placement vs community based adp
Comparing Costs:Detention Placement vs. Community Based ADP

Cost of Detention

Cost of ADP

  • DJS Youth: $112/day

    (Reported by Carroll County DJS)

  • 90 Day Commitment: $10,080 per youth

  • Total Cost for 30 Youth:

    $302,400

  • DJS Youth: $37/day

  • 90 Day Stay: $3,330 per youth

  • Total Cost for 30 Youth:

    $100,000

Annual Savings: $299,070


Innovation

Innovation

Teaching youth to navigate from risk to adventure…


Guiding principle youth will work together to make a positive impact in their world given
Guiding principle – youth will work together to make a positive impact in their world given :

  • Opportunity

  • Guidance

  • Expectation


Setting the tone of expectation the adventure diversion code of conduct
Setting the Tone of Expectation: The "Adventure Diversion Code of Conduct"

Respect:

I agree to respect adult leaders and other participants.

I understand that the following behaviors will not be tolerated: * Fighting * Stealing * Vandalism * Foul Language * Inappropriate Contact

Behavior:

I agree not to possess any drugs; tobacco; alcohol; fireworks; matches; cigarette lighters; knives; items that would endanger people, pets, wildlife, or property; illegal items.

Attendance:

I agree to attend all classes - missing classes may result in further legal action.. I agree to have the Adventure Diversion Coordinator and my probation officer approve a scheduled absence at least one week before the date.


Goals
Goals

  • Grow as individuals

  • Work as a team

  • Develop leadership skills

  • Bonus: Learn an appreciation for the outdoors


Challenges
Challenges…

  • Challenges their comfort level with peer interactions.

  • Challenges their tolerance for frustration and ability to delay gratification.

  • Challenges their “typical” response of being defiant.

  • Challenges limitations they may have placed on themselves (fears, physical abilities, negative self-messages).


It s character building
"It's Character Building…"

  • Self Control

  • Respect

  • Sense of Community

  • Teamwork

  • Leadership

  • Pro-Social Skills

  • New Recreational Habits

  • Communication

  • Problem Solving

  • Conflict Resolution

  • Decision Making

  • Environmental Awareness



Fy 07 fy 09 82 4 did not have violations of the court order while participating in adp n 74
Fy '07- Fy'09: 82.4% did not have violations of the court order while participating in ADPN=74


Fy 07 fy 09 76 were not placed in a juvenile detention facility for 12 months post service n 49
FY '07-FY'09: 76% were not placed in a juvenile detention facility for 12-months post service N=49


FY'07-FY'09: 87% of youth completing the program with participation at 85 days or more were not placed in a juvenile detention facility for 12-months post service N=31


Awards and acknowledgements
Awards and Acknowledgements participation at 85 days or more were

  • The National Association of Counties 2009 Achievement Award for demonstrating outstanding collaborative partnerships in effective programming for the community.

  • November 2009: Acceptance into the OJJDP Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders (DSO) Best Practices Database. Meets the DSO criteria:

    • Based on clear and well-articulated framework

    • Establishes a causal association between the treatment & outcome

    • Evaluation findings show empirical evidence of some impact on DSO trends


Where we are going
Where we are going… participation at 85 days or more were

  • Evidence Based Practice

    • FY’10 implementation of evidence based tool: Child Behavior Checklist, Teacher’s Report Form, & Youth Self-Report (Achenbach, T. & Rescorla, L.).

  • Earlier Intervention

    • Involving youth sooner, in an effort to prevent deeper entry into court system.


Bibliography
Bibliography participation at 85 days or more were

Butler, Steve, and Karl E. Rohnke. Quicksilver. Boston: Kendall/Hunt Company, 2003.

Achenbach, T.M., and Rescorla, L.A. Manual for the ASEBA School-Age Forms & Profiles. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth & Families, 2001.


Joyce Agatone, LCSW-C participation at 85 days or more were

Adventure Diversion Program Director

443.244.8640

[email protected]

Chris Pearce, B.S.

Adventure Diversion Program Coordinator

443.244.8669

[email protected]


The Mentor participation at 85 days or more were

Terms and Eligibility

  • The Mentee

  • Terms and Eligibility

  • Mentees are male or female,

  • ages 13-18 years old

  • Mentees may be in an at-risk situation (poor grades, difficulty with authority figures); be engaging in high risk behaviors (runaway, substance abuse, truancy); and/or in need of a caring and supportive adult figure.

  • Mentees are willing to participate in the program.

  • Referrals can be made by parents, teachers, probations officers, or any caring adult.

  • Mentors are at least 21 years old and motivated to be a positive influence in the life of an at-risk adolescent.

  • Mentors must successfully pass various criminal background checks and drug testing.

  • Mentors commit to meet with their mentee for a minimum of 4 hours per month for 1 year.

  • Mentors will have the opportunity to be oriented, participate in relevant trainings and events, and network with other mentors throughout their experience.

Carroll Mentoring

Carroll County Youth

Service Bureau

In Partnership with

The Local Management Board of Carroll County

www.CCYSB.org


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