Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected
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Chapter 7 – The Mathematics of Networks – The Cost of Being Connected. Notes 1 - Section 7.1. Trees. Notes 1 - Section 7.1. Essential Learnings. Students will understand the basic vocabulary for networks. Students will understand and be able to create trees. Network.

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Chapter 7 – The Mathematics of Networks – The Cost of Being Connected

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Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Chapter 7 – The Mathematics of Networks – The Cost of Being Connected

Notes 1 - Section 7.1


Trees

Trees

Notes 1 - Section 7.1


Essential learnings

Essential Learnings

  • Students will understand the basic vocabulary for networks.

  • Students will understand and be able to create trees.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Network

  • A network is a graph that is connected.

  • In this context the termis most commonly used when the graph models a real-life “network.”


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Network

  • Thevertices of a network are “objects” – transmitting stations, computer servers, places, cell phones, people, and so on.

  • The edgesof a network (oftencalled links) indicate connectionsamong theobjects – wires, cables, roads, Internet connections, social connections, and so on.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Network

The WorldWide Web is a classic example of anevolutionary network – it follows no predetermined master plan and essentially evolveson its own without structure or centralized direction

There are some rules of behaviorbut not many.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Network

At the opposite end of the spectrum fromevolutionary networks are networks that arecentrally planned and carefully designed tomeet certain goals and objectives.

Often thesetypes of networks are very expensive to build, and one of the primary considerations when designing such networks is minimizing their cost. This certainly applies to networks of roads, fiber-optic cable lines, rail lines, power lines, and so on.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Optimal Network

  • The general theme of this chapter is the problem of finding optimal networksconnecting a set of points.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Optimal Network

Optimal meansshortest, cheapest, or fastest, depending on whether the cost variable is distance,money, or time. Thus, the design of an optimal network involves two basic goals:

(1) to make sure that all the vertices (stations, places, people, etc.) end up connectedto the network

(2) to minimize the total cost of the network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Trees

For obviousreasons, problems of this type are known as minimum network problems.

The backbone of a minimum network is a special type of graph called a tree.

This chapter starts with a discussion of the properties of trees.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

The Amazonia Telephone Company is contracted to provide

telephone, cable,and Internet service to the seven small mining towns shown.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

Thesetowns are located deep in the heart of the Amazon jungle, which makes theproject particularly difficult and expensive.

In this environment the most practical and environmentally friendly option is to create a network of undergroundfiber-optic cable lines connecting the towns.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

In addition, it makes sense to burythe underground cable lines along the already existing roads connecting thetowns.

It makes it easier to maintain and repair the lines.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

Here is a weighted graph graph model

describing the situation. The vertices of the graph represent thetowns, the edges of the graph represent the existing roads,


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

and the weight ofeach edge represents the cost (in millions of dollars) of creating a fiber-opticcable connection along that particular road.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – The Amazonian Cable

Network

The problem facing the engineers and planners at the Amazonia TelephoneCompany is to build a cable network that:

(1) utilizes the existing network ofroads,

(2) connects all the towns, and

(3) has the least cost.

The challenge, ofcourse, is in meeting the last requirement.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Language of Graphs

Reformulate the three requirements of Example 7.1 in the languageof graphs:

  • The network must be a subgraph of the original graph (in otherwords, its edges must come from the original graph).

  • The network must span the original graph (in other words, itmust include all the vertices of the original graph)


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Language of Graphs

3.The network must be minimal (in other words, the total weight ofthe network should be as small as possible).


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Minimal Network

The last requirement has an important corollary–a minimal network cannothave any circuits. Why not? Imagine that the solid edges in the figure representalready existing links in a minimal network.

Why would you then build the linkbetween X and Y and close the circuit? The edge XY would be a redundant linkof the network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Definitions

■A network is just another name for a connected graph. This terminology ismost commonly used when the graph models a real-life situation.

When thenetwork has weights associated to the edges, we call it a weighted network.

■A network with no circuits is called a tree.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Definitions

■A spanning tree of a network is a subgraph that connects allthe vertices ofthe network and has no circuits.

■Among all spanning trees of a weighted network, one with least total weightis called a minimum spanning tree (MST) of the network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

The six graphs on the following slides all have the same set of vertices (A through L).

Let’s imagine, for the purposes of illustration, that these vertices represent computer labs at a university, and that the edges are Ethernet connections betweenpairs of labs.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

In this figure, there is no network–the graph is disconnected.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

The graph is now connected and we have a network. However, in thisnetwork there are several circuits (for example, K,H,I,J,K) that create redun-dant connections. In other words, this network is not a tree.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

In this figure, there is a partial tree connecting some of, but not all, the labs. Gand I are left out, so once again, we have no network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

This figure shows a tree that spans (i.e., reaches) all the vertices. We nowhave a network connecting all the labs and without any redundant connections.

Here, the tree is the network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

This figure shows (in red) the same tree as in the previous slide but now highlightedinside of a larger network. In this case wedescribe the red tree as a spanning tree of the larger network, which showsa different spanning tree for the same network.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example – Networks, Trees, and

Spanning Trees

This figure showsa different spanning tree for the same network as in the previous slide.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Properties of Trees

As graphs go, trees occupy an important niche between disconnected graphs and“overconnected” graphs.

A tree is special by virtue of the fact that it is barely connected. This means several things:


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Properties of Trees

■For any two vertices X and Y of a tree, there is one and only one path joiningX to Y. (If there were two differentpaths joining X and Y, then these twopaths would form a circuit, as shown.)


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Properties of Trees

■Every edge of a tree is a bridge. (Suppose that some edge AB is not a bridge.Then without AB the graph is still connected, so there must be an alternativepath from A to B. This would imply that the edge AB is part of a circuit asillustrated.)


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Properties of Trees

■Among all networks with N vertices, a tree is the one with the fewest numberof edges.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

Imagine the following “connect-the-dots” game: Start with eight isolated vertices. Theobject of the game is to create a network connecting the vertices by adding edges, oneat a time. You are free to create any network you want. In this game, bridges are good and circuits are bad.

Imagine, for example, that for each bridge in your network youget a $10 reward, but for each circuit in your network you pay a $10 penalty.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

We will let M denote the number of edgesyou have added at any point in time. In the early stages of the gamethe graph is disconnected.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

For M = 7, the graph becomes connected. Each of these networks is a tree, and thus each of the sevenedges is a bridge. Stop here and you will come out $70 richer.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

Interestingly, this is as good as it will get.

When M = 8,the graph will have acircuit–it just can’t be avoided. In addition, none of the edges in that circuit canbe bridges of the graph.

As a consequence, the larger the circuit that we create, thefewer the bridges left in the graph. See the next slide for some examples.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

A circuit,

5 bridges

A circuit,

2 bridges

A circuit,

1 bridge


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Example - Connect the Dots (and

then Stop)

As the value of M increases, the numberof circuits goes up (very quickly) and the number of bridges goes down.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

3 Key Properties of Trees

PROPERTY 1

■In a tree, there is one and only one path joining any two vertices.

■If there is one and only one path joining any two vertices of a graph, thenthe graph must be a tree.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

3 Key Properties of Trees

PROPERTY 2

■In a tree, every edge is a bridge.

■If every edge of a graph is a bridge, then the graph must be a tree.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

3 Key Properties of Trees

PROPERTY 3

■A tree with N vertices has N – 1edges.

■If a network has N vertices and

N – 1edges, then it must be a tree.


Chapter 7 the mathematics of networks the cost of being connected

Disconnected Graph

Notice that a disconnected graph (i.e., not a network) can have N verticesand N – 1 edges, as shown.


Assignment

Assignment

p. 265: 1, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 37, 41


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