Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 32

Lecture 2: The Size of the Medical Care Market PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 64 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

ECON 850 Health Economics Gilleskie. Lecture 2: The Size of the Medical Care Market. Sources: http://www.cms.hhs.gov/NationalHealthExpendData/ http://bea.gov/index.htm http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_files/publications http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ http://nces.ed.gov

Download Presentation

Lecture 2: The Size of the Medical Care Market

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

ECON 850 Health Economics Gilleskie

Lecture 2: The Size of the Medical Care Market

Sources:

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/NationalHealthExpendData/

http://bea.gov/index.htm

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_files/publications

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/

http://nces.ed.gov

http://hadm.sph.sc.edu/Courses/Econ/Classes/nhe00/


U s national health expenditure from 1960 to 2006

U.S. National Health Expenditure from 1960 to 2006

2007 data:

NHE: $ 2,241 billion

GDP: $ 13,808 billion

NHE % of GDP: 16.2


Growth rates of national health spending and total economy spending

Growth Rates of National Health Spending and Total Economy Spending


Changes in medical care prices and changes in all prices

Changes in Medical Care Prices and Changes in All Prices


Who spent all the health care money who pays for all these services

Who spent all the health care money?Who pays for all these services?


Finer breakdown of who pays i e the money flow

Finer breakdown of who pays (i.e., the money flow)

Payment financed by philanthropy, hospital fees, and gift shop and food sales

Payment by private health insurance financed by premiums

Uncompensated care: not included unless money is received through indigent care funds or extra charges on other payers.


Amounts spent on each major category of health services and supplies

Amounts spent on each major category of health services and supplies


Relative shares of the health services and supplies dollar

Relative shares of the health services and supplies dollar


Percentage of gdp contributed by personal spending of durable goods non durable goods and services

Percentage of GDP contributed by personal spending of durable goods, non-durable goods and services

Non-durables: food, clothing, gas, tobacco, Rx


Breakdown of the services category

Breakdown of the services category


U s education expenditures

U.S. Education Expenditures


Growing pressure on government spending

Growing Pressure on Government Spending

Federal Outlays

State General Fund Spending

Total = $2.3 Trillion

Total = $499 Billion

SOURCE: CBO, Baseline Budget Outlook, January 2005; National Association of State Budget Officers, 2003 State Expenditure Report, 2004.


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

Lecture 2: The Health of the U.S.


Infant mortality rates 2004

Infant mortality rates, 2004


Percentage of live births and infant deaths by weeks of gestation 2005

Percentage of live births and infant deaths by weeks of gestation, 2005

Live births

Infant deaths


Low birth weight prevalence in other countries

Low birth weight prevalence in other countries?

  • International comparisons of preterm births are even more problematic

    • differences in the completeness of registration of births

    • varying definitions of preterm births

    • inconsistent ascertainment of gestational age

      • high proportion of home births in these countries

      • difficulty of obtaining accurate information on menstrual dates

    • Canada:6.2 (1981) 6.8 (1992)

    • Great Britain: 5.4 (1958) 5.1 (1970)

    • France: 6.8 (1976) 5.6 (1981)

    • Sweden: 5.5 (1973) 6.1 (1981)

  • The high rate of low birth weight births in developing countries is primarily due to intrauterine growth retardation, whereas preterm birth is a more important factor in developed countries.


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

  • Non-medical causes:

  • motor vehicle traffic

  • firearms

  • poisoning

  • fall

  • suffocation

  • drowning


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

Death Rates from Injuries, by Mechanism and Country

[Average annual injury deaths per 100,000 population for time period indicated]

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, Advance Data, No. 303, October 7, 1998.


Age adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death united states 2001 2006

Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for the Five Leading Causes of Death --- United States, 2001--2006

* Per 100,000 standard population


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS,1990, 1998, 2007

(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)

1998

1990

2007

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Lecture 2 the size of the medical care market

Lecture 2: Who consumes this care?


How are us health care expenses distributed

How are US health care expenses distributed?

Half of the population spends little

or nothing on health care, while 5 percent of the population spends almost half of the total amount (2002).

* The 22% and 49% (2002 figures) are down from 28% and 56% in 1996.


Medicaid enrollees and expenditures by enrollment group 2003

Medicaid Enrollees and Expendituresby Enrollment Group, 2003

Elderly

9%

Elderly

26%

Disabled

16%

Adults

27%

Disabled

43%

Children

48%

Adults 12%

Children 19%

Total = 52.4 million

Total = $252 billion

Note: Total expenditures on benefits excludes DSH payments.

SOURCE: KCMU estimates based on CBO and OMB data, 2004.


Medicaid payments per enrollee by acute and long term care 2003

Medicaid Payments Per Enrolleeby Acute and Long-Term Care, 2003

$12,800

$12,300

Long-Term

Care

Acute

Care

$1,900

$1,700

SOURCE: KCMU estimates based on CBO and Urban Institute data, 2004.


How could we measure the health of our medical care system

How could we measure the health of our medical care system?

  • sustained good health

  • continued productivity

  • restored function after illness

  • avoided costs, rather than initial costs

  • waiting times

  • satisfaction with care


  • Login