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Engaging and Educating Tomorrow’s Digital Learners …. University of New Hampshire June 2006 Don Knezek - ISTE CEO - [email protected] 1. Engaging Digital Learners. The Millennials: Who are these guys and what are they thinking? A bit of context A little from the researchers

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Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Engaging and Educating Tomorrow’s DigitalLearners …

University of New Hampshire

June 2006

Don Knezek - ISTE CEO - [email protected]

1


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Engaging Digital Learners

The Millennials: Who are these guys and

what are they thinking?

  • A bit of context

  • A little from the researchers

  • More from the mouths of babes

  • Examples & experiences from preK-12

  • What it means for higher education

2


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent; it is the one that is most adaptable to change.”

Charles Darwin

3


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

• Tools are different ...

• Communication is different ...

• Information is different ...

• Kids are different ...

• Learning is different …

And Teaching must be different!

4


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

5


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

The Florida Virtual School (with 50K students) contracts with a group from Nova Scotia for first-line technical assistance …

6


90 85

Doing Science in the 21st Century

90% 85%

Percentage of worktime in a digital environment.

7


90 851

Doing Science in the 21st Century

90% 85%

Percentage of worktime in a digital environment.

Molecular Chemist

8


90 852

Doing Science in the 21st Century

90% 85%

Percentage of worktime in a digital environment.

Molecular Chemist * Neuroscience Researcher

9


Fifty percent of all computer software developed in the world today is written in india

Fifty percent of all computer software developed in the world today is written in India …

10


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

• Tools are different ...

• Communication is different ...

• Information is different ... *

11


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

• Tools are different ...

• Communication is different ...

• Information is different ... *

• Kids are different ...

15


Students bring different experiences

Students bring different experiences …

16


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting

A Study by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

CONNECTED TO THE FUTURE (U.S. 2003)

√ Internet use exceeds television watching

√ Children’s internet use is up 59% in 2 years

√ Usage among 2-5 year olds is growing fastest

Grunwald Associates

www.cpb.org/ed/resources/connected

17


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting1

Who Are Our Students?

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • Largest generation (36% of total population).

  • 31% are minorities; more diverse than the adult population.

  • Have come of age along with the Internet.

  • Information has been universally available and free to them; community is a digital place of common interest, not just a shared physical space.

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A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting2

Family is Important

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 91% of students felt they have at least one family member they can confide in.

  • If they could, 50% of students would spend more time with their family.

  • 74% get along with their parents extremely or very well.

  • When picking one person as a role model, 44% of students pick a family member.

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A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting3

Education Beliefs

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 91% of students have a teacher/administrator who personally cares about their success.

  • 60% of students report that standardized tests are a good measure of progress.

    •96% say doing well in school is important in their lives.

    •88% of students report that attending college is critical or very important to future success.

20


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting4

Interested in World and Community

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 76% of students would like to learn more about the world.

  • 28% of high school students use a foreign news source to learn about current events.

  • 75% still look toward a future with optimism and hope.

  • 70% of students report volunteering or participating in community service.

21


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting5

Have Substantial Purchasing Power

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • In 2002, teens (ages 12-19) spent $170 billion.

  • 15.6 million college students (ages 18-30) spend almost $200 billion annually.

  • Two out of three students report influencing their parents’ buying decisions.

  • 20% of teens own stock.

22


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting6

Even Young Children

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 72% of all first graders used a home computer during the summer on a weekly basis.

  • Over 85% of young children with home computers used them for educational purposes.

  • By 1999, 97% of kindergartners (now middle-schoolers) had access to a computer at school or home.

  • 35% of children ages 2-5 use the Internet from some location.

23


Students bring different expectations

Students bring different expectations …

24


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting7

Broadband

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 43% of middle class homes in the U.S. have a broadband network in the home

  • Represents a 68% increase in home broadband networks in one year

  • 98% of all PreK-12 schools and 90%+ of all classrooms in the U.S. have fast internet connections.

25


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting8

Online Teens

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • 71% of online teens say they relied mostly on Internet sources for the last big project they did for school.

  • 94% of online teens report using the Internet for school-related research.

  • 74% of online teens use instant messaging.

  • 24% of online teens have created their own Web pages.

  • The number of children ages 4 to 18 who own at least one wireless device (e.g. cell phones, PDAs) grew from 32% in 2002 to 43% in 2003.

  • 13% of those age 7 and under own a wireless device

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Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

http://www.netday.org/speakup_2005.htm

27


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

State, Regional, Individual Differences

Students in New England (Grades 6-12):

• Prefer instant messaging over talking on their cell phones (opposite of national results)

• Expect to check a grade electronically far less (28%) than students across the country (50%)

•Are significantly (25%) less likely to e-mail a teacher than are their colleagues nationally

•Continue to experience a digital divide based on school and individual wealth (as do students across the nation)

•Are likely to attend school in a state with a below average State Educational Technology Rating (Education Week)

28


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting9

Technology Counts - Education Week

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

2006 State Education Technology Report Card:

  • National Average … C+

  • Maine … B-

    •New York … C+

    •Connecticut … C-

    • New Hampshire … C-

    • Massachusetts … D+

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Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Perceptions About School

Among 12th Graders -

• 35%

• 29%

• 23%

• 21%

30


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Perceptions About School

Among 12th Graders -

• 35% - 1983

• 29% - 1990

• 23% - 1995

• 21% - 2000

• Courses are quite or very interesting

31


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Perceptions About School (US)

High School Courses Interesting

(Grade 12 - Age 18)

32


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Perceptions About School (US)

Among 12th Graders in the U.S. -

• 35% - 1983 • 75% - 1982

• 29% - 1990 • 73% - 1988

• 23% - 1995 • 69% - 1995

• 21% - 2000 • 68% - 2002

• Study Interesting • Students Graduating

33


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Expectations for Higher Education

Among 8th Graders in the U.S.

• About 90% expect to continue their schooling after graduating from high school

•Overwhelming indicate importance of education for life success

34


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Expectations for Higher Education

Among Students in the U.S.

• About 1 in 3 fails to graduate on schedule

• Only 27% complete as much as 2 years of College (or 73% “drop out”)

•Over 80% of dropouts could have graduated

35


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

• Tools are different ...

• Communication is different ...

• Information is different ...

• Kids are different ...

• Learning is different …

36


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Online Learning in Higher Education

Growing by Degrees: Online Education in the U.S., 2005 - Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Emerging Trends

• Over 60% of IHEs offer courses online

• Core faculty are teaching online

• 72% of 2-year colleges plan for significant online programs long-term

• Growth in enrollment continues strong; up 400,000 in 2 years

37


South korea has 800 000 students in online learning with scorm compliant learning objects

South Korea has 800,000 students in online learning with SCORM-compliant learning objects …

38


New environments enable more effective strategies

New environments enable more effective strategies …

39


A report on children s internet use from the corporation for public broadcasting10

Hottest Trends Put Kids Online

A Report on Children’s Internet Use FromThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting

  • Wireless access enables anytime, anywhere connectivity

  • One-to-one computing supports ubiquitous access

  • Virtual schools exploit online learning

  • Personal wireless devices facilitate communications and collaborative learning

40


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Establishing New Learning Environments

Traditional -------- Incorporating ------ New Environments New Strategies

Teacher-centered instruction Learner-centered environments

Single sense stimulation Multisensory stimulation

Single path progression Multipath progression

Single media Multimedia; Hypermedia

Isolated work Collaborative work

Information delivery Information exchange, publication, creation

Passive learning Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning

Factual/literal thinking Critical thinking, informed decision-making

Reactive response Proactive/planned action

Isolated, artificial context Authentic, real world context

41


Learning and educational technology

Learning and Educational Technology

Learning and Educational Technology

Technology can be used in many ways to change and improve learning experiences. Student projects (video for example) can motivate engagement in an activity which might otherwise not be particularly motivating.

Project-based learning can also cause reflection and “communications” about learning for much deeper understanding.

(Supported with a video of project-based student work.)

42


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Ready or Not . . .The World is Different

• Work is different ...

• Tools are different ...

• Communication is different ...

• Information is different ...

• Kids are different ...

• Learning is different …

And Teaching must be different!

44


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Capable Technology-Using Teachers?

Teachers report:

• Fewer than one in four are confident with technology in learning

• While 70% receive technology training, almost all is one-day or less per year

• New teachers are prepared to use technology but often only personally

45


A central issue is curriculum

A central issue is curriculum …

46


90 853

Getting Real (World) with Science

90% 85%

Percentage of worktime in a digital environment.

Molecular Chemist * Neuroscience Researcher

47


Engaging instructional materials are important

Engaging Instructional Materials are important …

48


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Technology and Change

“Maybe I’m wrong, but I should say that in ten years textbooks as the principle medium of teaching will be as obsolete as the horse and carriage are now.”

  • Diaries of Thomas Edison, 1925

49


Iste international society for technology in education

ISTE

ISTEInternational Society for Technology in Education

Mission

"Providing leadership and service to improve teaching and learning by advancing the effective use of technology in education."

50


International society for technology in education

Mission Statement: ISTE provides leadership and service to improve teaching and learning by advancing the effective use of technology in K–12 and teacher education.

The trusted source in education technology for professional development, knowledge generation, and advocacy.

ISTE represents over 85,000 teachers, teacher educators, administrators, and decision makers.

International Society for Technology in Education

A nonprofit membership organization

51


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Affiliates

76 regional and national Affiliates in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Jamaica, China, U.S. Virgin Islands, and the United States

CUE (California)

TCEA (Texas)

Corporate Program

ISTE 100 Program - 70+ providers of ed tech, services, curriculum, professional development, other resources

Special Interest Groups

SIGAdmin (Administrators)

SIGCS (Computer Science Educators)

HyperSIG (Hypermedia and Multimedia)

SIGMS (Media Specialists)

SETSIG (Special Education Technology)

SIGTE (Teacher Educators)

SIGTC (Technology Coordinators)

SIGTel (Telelearning)

SIGDE (Digital Equity)

SIGHC (Handheld Computing)

SIGILT (Innovative Learning Technologies)

SIGIVC (Interactive Video Conferencing)

Who are Our Members?

52


It is worth it

It is worth it …

54


Research shows

Research shows

“Students whose teachers were high level users of technology in the classroom scored significantly better than did students whose teachers were low level users of technology in the classroom.”

Middleton and Murray,

1999

55


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

ISTE’s Center for

Applied Research in Educational Technology

C.A.R.E.T.

http://caret.iste.org

CARET

Don Knezek

[email protected]

56


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

New Era of School Reform

In the new era of school reform, change is:

  • Based on the realization that reform is a highly contextualized phenomenon.

  • Characterized by a heavy emphasis on data.

  • Approached on an incremental basis.

    … What Works In Schools: Translating Research into Action

    Robert Marzano, 2003 ASCD

57


It is systemic and it is about leadership

It is systemic and it is about leadership …

58


New environments enable more effective strategies1

New environments enable more effective strategies …

59


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Establishing New Learning Environments

Traditional -------- Incorporating ------ New Environments New Strategies

Teacher-centered instruction Learner-centered environments

Single sense stimulation Multisensory stimulation

Single path progression Multipath progression

Single media Multimedia; Hypermedia

Isolated work Collaborative work

Information delivery Information exchange, publication, creation

Passive learning Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning

Factual/literal thinking Critical thinking, informed decision-making

Reactive response Proactive/planned action

Isolated, artificial context Authentic, real world context

60


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Important Resource from Educause

Educating the Net Generation

http://www.educause.edu/educatingthenetgen/5989

NETGEN

Don Knezek

[email protected]

61


Essential conditions are essential

Essential conditions are essential …

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Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Essential Conditionsfor Effective Use of ICT

• Shared Vision

• Equitable Access

• Skilled Personnel

• Professional Learning

• Technical Assistance

• Content Standards and Resources

63


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Essential Conditionsfor Effective Use of ICT

• Student-Centered Teaching

• Assessment and Accountability

• Community Support

• Internal Support Policies

• External Policy

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Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Technology for Transforming Schools

National Boundaries Do Not Matter:

• Expectations for Technology are Global

• A Shared Vision is Critical

• Knowledgeable Leadership is Key

• Essential Conditions are Essential

• Skilled Teachers are Necessary

• Measurement Must Inform Transformation

65


If you want to see a nation that has done ict right check out singapore

If you want to see a nation that has done ICT right, check out Singapore …

66


Engaging and educating tomorrow s digital learners

Contact Information

Thank you

For more information go to www.iste.org or contact me at

Don Knezek, [email protected]

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