DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ROOFTOP RAINWATER HARVESTING SYSTEM(RRHS)                     FOR D-BLO...
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DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ROOFTOP RAINWATER HARVESTING SYSTEM(RRHS) FOR D-BLOCK OF VNRVJIET CAMPUS. By. G.Sandhya Rani (10071A0174) J.Sai K iran (10071A0176) K.Sravan kumar (10071A0185). B.Rani (11075A0117) M .Mahesh (11075A0124).

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UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF Dr. B. Nagamalleswara Rao Professor & Head

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Under the guidance of dr b nagamalleswara rao professor head

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ROOFTOP RAINWATER HARVESTING SYSTEM(RRHS) FOR D-BLOCK OF VNRVJIET CAMPUS

By

  • G.SandhyaRani (10071A0174)

  • J.SaiKiran (10071A0176)

  • K.Sravankumar (10071A0185)

  • B.Rani (11075A0117)

  • M.Mahesh (11075A0124)

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF

Dr. B. NagamalleswaraRao

Professor & Head

Department of Civil Engineering

VNR Vignana Jyothi Institute of Engineering &Technology,

Bachupally, Nizampet (S.O), Hyderabad-500090, AP


Contents

CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION

2. OBJECTIVES

3. LITERATURE REVIEW

4. METHODOLOGY

5. TIME SCHEDULE

6. APPLICATIONS

7. CONCLUSION

8. REFERENCES


1 introduction

1.INTRODUCTION

  • Water is the most common or major substance on earth, covering more than 70% of the planets surface. The total amount of water on earth remains constant.

  • The rapid growth in population together with industrial development, are putting stress on the natural ecosystems.

  • Water supply mainly depends on the natural water bodies likes lakes and artificial water bodies like reservoirs etc.

  • Due to the Urbanisation and rapid growth in the population many lakes has been lost and the majority of the present were polluted .

  • This results in the imbalance of demand and supply of water.

  • To overcome supply shortages, many households, businesses and industries fall back on groundwater reserves. The number of bore wells increased.


1 introduction1

  • This is leading to the fall in the ground water table.

  • One possible strategy could be the usage of rainwater in order to overcome the shortage of water.

  • Rain water harvesting means to make optimum use of rain water at the place where it falls i.e. conserve it and not allowing it to drain away.

  • The water can be used as drinking water, water for livestock, water for irrigation or to refill aquifers in a process called ground water recharge.

  • The rainwater falling on roof of residential buildings and institutions can be an important contribution to the availability of water.

1.INTRODUCTION


Under the guidance of dr b nagamalleswara rao professor head

Hydrological cycle


Abstract

ABSTRACT

Roof water harvesting is being widely promoted as a panacea for the growing drinking water crisis in India and many underdeveloped and developing countries. This project analyzes the scope, physical feasibility and economic viability of roof water harvesting systems. The economic viability as a supplementary source of domestic water supply seems to be poor in urban areas, when compared to augmenting the supplies from the existing public systems. The incredibly low rates charged for domestic supplies by urban water utilities and government subsidies for RWHS would not only lead to the urban elite increasing their access to water supplies, while the burden on water utilities would remain unchanged. This will lead to greater inequities in access to water supplies. At the same time, in rural areas with dispersed populations and hilly areas, RWHS may be economically viable as a supplementary source to already existing public water supply schemes.


2 objectives

2.OBJECTIVES

Design of rain water harvesting system components.

Implementation of rain water harvesting system in D Block of VNRVJIET campus

Cost benefit analysis


3 literature review

3. LITERATURE REVIEW

ANIL AGARWAL (2013): Manual on Urban Rainwater Harvesting “Catch Water Where it Falls”

KIRAN. A, NIKHIL. T, R HARISH, J KULKARNI (2012): Harvested Rain Water for Drinking- Research Paper.

ROHITASHW KUMAR, THAMAN S, AGRAWAL G. and SHARMA POONAM(2011): Rain Water Harvesting and Ground Water Recharging in North Western Himalayan Region for Sustainable Agricultural Productivity- Research Paper.

M. DINESH KUMAR, ANKIT PATEL(2005) : Rainwater Harvesting in the Water-scarce Regions of India potential and Pitfalls-Research paper

ACHAYRA, B. P. (2004). Managing Water Sector Institution - HMWSSB Experience (Presentation). Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board, Hyderabad.

SIVARAMAN , K.R. & THILLAI GOVINDARAJAN S.. (2003), Manual on Rainwater Harvesting. Chennai, Akash Ganga.

ARIYABANDU R. D. S. (2003). Very-Low-Cost Domestic Roof Water Harvesting in the Humid Tropics: Its Role in Water Policy. Sri Lanka Domestic Roofwater Harvesting Research Programme.


4 methodology

4. METHODOLOGY

Collection of the building data.

Collection of rainfall data of past 10 years.

Design of RWHS components

Implementation


Components of rwhs

COMPONENTS OF RWHS

Drain Pipe

  • Roof Catchment

  • Drain pipes

  • Down pipes

  • First Flush Pipe

  • Storage Tank

  • Recharge Pit

Storage tank

  • Down pipe

  • First Flush Pipe


Design of rwhs components

DESIGN OF RWHS COMPONENTS

1.Roof catchment

2.Calculation of Volume of Runoff

3.Design of Rectangular Storage Tank

4.Design of Conduits

5.Design of Recharge Pit


Design of rwhs

DESIGN OF RWHS

1.Roof catchment:

  • The area of the roof from which the rain water is collected.

  • The total roof area of D block = 2351 m2


Under the guidance of dr b nagamalleswara rao professor head

ROOF PLAN

ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN MM


Design of rwhs1

DESIGN OF RWHS

2.Calculation of Volume of Runoff:

Area of catchment = 2351 m2

Annual average rainfall = 887 mm

= 0.887m

Runoff co-efficient = 0.85

Volume of runoff = area of catchment x annual

average rainfall x runoff

co-efficient

= 2351 x 0.887 x 0.85

= 1773 m3/yr


Design of rwhs2

DESIGN OF RWHS

Average value of highest

rainfall in rainy days = 94mm =0.094m

Volume of Runoff = 2351 x 0.094 x 0.85

= 188 m3/day

For economical design considering half of the discharge as volume of tank

Volume of tank = 94 m3


Design of rwhs3

DESIGN OF RWHS

3.Design of Rectangular Storage Tank:

Assume depth of tank = 2m

Area of tank = volume of the tank/depth

= 94/2 = 47m2 = 50m2(approx.)

Taking Length: Breadth ratio as 2:1

L = 2B

2B x B = 50

B = 5m

L = 10m

Storage Tank

ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS


Existing pipe details

EXISTING PIPE DETAILS


Design of rwhs4

DESIGN OF RWHS

4.Design of Conduits:

Taking diameter of pipe = 110mm = 0.11m

Average value of highest

rainfall in rainy days = 94mm =0.094m

Taking number of pipes = 10

Volume of water that can be

discharged through 10 pipes = 2351×0.094×0.85

= 188 m3/day

Volume of water that can be

discharged through each pipe = 188/10 = 18.8m3/day

= 2.17×10-4 m3/sec


Design of rwhs5

DESIGN OF RWHS

5.Design of Recharge Pit:

The recharge pit is designed for one third of discharge

Volume of recharge pit = 62m3

Assuming depth of recharge pit = 3m

Area of the recharge pit = 62/3 = 20 m2

Taking Length: Breadth ratio as 2:1

L = 2B

2B x B = 20

B = 3.2m

L = 6.4m

ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN MM


Estimation costing

ESTIMATION & COSTING


Estimation of materials

ESTIMATION OF MATERIALS


Cost for work and materials

COST FOR WORK AND MATERIALS


Cost of project

COST OF PROJECT

Cost of the Project = Total Cost of work for storage tank + Total Cost of work for Recharge Pit + Cost of Materials

Cost of the Project = Rs. 97882.6 + Rs. 16532.6+ Rs.240098.32

= Rs. 354513.52/-

Cost of Tools and Plants =1.5% of Cost of Project

=0.015 x 354513.52

= Rs.5317/-

Cost of Contingence = 5% of Cost of Project

= 0.05 x 354513.52

= Rs.17,725.68/-

Cost of Work Charge Establishment =2% of Cost of Project

= 0.02 x 354513.52

= Rs.7090.27/-

Total Cost of Project = Cost of the Project + Cost of Tools and Plants + Cost of Contingence + Cost of Work Charge Establishment

= Rs.4,48,459/-


Cost benefit analysis

COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS


Rainfall data

RAINFALL DATA


5 time schedule

5.TIMESCHEDULE


6 applications

6. APPLICATIONS

To overcome the inadequacy of water to meet our demands.

To arrest decline in ground water levels.

To increase availability of ground water at specific place and time and utilize rainwater for sustainable development.

To increase infiltration of rainwater in the subsoil which has decreased drastically in urban areas.

To reduce the expenditure spent on water.


7 conclusion

7. CONCLUSION

  • Since VNR VignanaJyothi Institute of Engineering and Technology has no water supply through pipes, the institute has to buy the water through tankers.

  • Daily 1 tanker supply the water to the institute, each tanker costs Rs1000/-, having a capacity of 20,000 liters. It is taking Rs.4,48,459/- for total construction of tank and recharge pit.

  • The amount of money saved in each year through rain water harvesting is Rs.70,920. The amount spent will be recovered in 6.3 years.

  • In order to save the expenses to some extent on buying water this “Rooftop Rainwater Harvesting System” has been designed.

  • The water which we get from roof of the building during rainy days are collected and stored.

  • The water which is collected is set to re-use for gardening, flushing purposes so that the expenses can be reduced to some extent.


8 references

8. REFERENCES

ANIL AGARWAL (2013): Manual on Urban Rainwater Harvesting “Catch Water Where it Falls”

KIRAN. A, NIKHIL. T, R HARISH, J KULKARNI (2012): Harvested Rain Water for Drinking- Research Paper.

ROHITASHW KUMAR, THAMAN S, AGRAWAL G. and SHARMA POONAM(2011): Rain Water Harvesting and Ground Water Recharging in North Western Himalayan Region for Sustainable Agricultural Productivity- Research Paper.

RAMACHANDRAIAH, C. (2007). Hyderabad’s Water Issues and the Musi River, Need for Integrated Solutions. Draft version of the Paper presented in the International Water Confe-rence, Berlin during 12-14 September 2007.

ACHAYRA, B. P. (2004). Managing Water Sector Institution - HMWSSB Experience (Presen-tation). Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board, Hyderabad.

SIVARAMAN , K.R. & THILLAIGOVINDARAJAN S.. (2003), Manual on Rainwater Har-vesting. Chennai, Akash Ganga.

ARIYABANDU R. D. S. (2003). Very-Low-Cost Domestic Roof Water Harvesting in theHu-mid Tropics: Its Role in Water Policy.Sri Lanka Domestic Roofwater Harvesting Research Pro-gramme.


Under the guidance of dr b nagamalleswara rao professor head

THANK YOU


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