Engineering teaching kits
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 57

Engineering Teaching Kits PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 50 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Engineering Teaching Kits. Engineering design in the science classroom Christine Schnittka University of KENTUCKY Larry G. Richards University of Virginia Susan K. Donohue The College of new jersey. Engineering Teaching Kits. Save the Penguins. Physics. Engineering. Protecting the

Download Presentation

Engineering Teaching Kits

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Engineering teaching kits

Engineering Teaching Kits

Engineering design in the science classroom

Christine Schnittka

University of KENTUCKY

Larry G. Richards

University of Virginia

Susan K. Donohue

The College of new jersey


Engineering teaching kits1

Engineering Teaching Kits


Save the penguins

Save the Penguins

Physics

Engineering

Protecting

the

Environment


Save the penguins etk

Save the Penguins ETK


Targeted demonstrations

Targeted Demonstrations

The Cans

The Trays

The Spoons

The House

The Mylar


Alternative conceptions about ht

Alternative Conceptions about HT

  • Cold is a substance that moves

  • Heat is a substance that rises

  • Heat is a substance like a fluid, made of particles

  • Larger ice cubes are colder than small ones

  • Metal is cold, plastic and wood are warm

  • Aluminum foil traps “coldness”; metals hold “cold”

  • Sweaters warm things

    (Albert, 1978; Clough & Driver, 1985; Erickson, 1979; Erickson, 1980)


Videos about penguins

Videos about Penguins

Penguin in a Pickle

Penguin Populations

Penguins are Melting


Penguin in a pickle

Penguin in a Pickle


Penguin populations

Penguin Populations


Penguins are melting

Penguins are Melting


Penguins in south africa

Penguins in South Africa


The engineering design process

The Engineering Design Process

  • Identify the Need

  • Define the Problem

  • Brainstorm Ideas

  • Conduct Research

  • Develop Design

    Revise Design

  • Test Design


As energy demands grow

As Energy Demands Grow…

  • … more electricity or fuel is used.

  • … burned fuels create carbon dioxide.

  • … power plants usually burn coal- which produces carbon dioxide too

  • … carbon dioxide is implicated in global warming

  • … global warming is not our friend.


So how can we save the penguins

So, How Can We Save the Penguins?


Save the penguins etk1

Save the Penguins ETK


Engineering design process

Engineering Design Process


Test materials design and build

Test Materials, Design, and Build!

Test materials if you are not sure which ones to use.

Think about conduction with the floor

Think about convection (hot air entering the house)

Think about radiation from ALL sides (even the bottom)

Your constraints are space and time.

Try to stay under a $200 budget! Extra materials are available for purchase (trade).


Results design iterations

Results: Design Iterations

4.7 g remaining

6.3 g remaining

5.5 g remaining

7.0 g remaining

3.1 g remaining

5.7 g remaining

3.9 g remaining

6.0 g remaining


Heat transfer evaluation pilot study

Heat Transfer Evaluation - Pilot Study


Heat transfer evaluation

Heat Transfer Evaluation

1. You pick up a can of soda off of the countertop. The countertop underneath the can feels colder than the rest of the counter. Which explanation do you think is the best?

a. The cold has been transferred from the soda to the counter.

b. There is no heat energy left in the counter beneath the can.

c. Some heat has been transferred from the counter to the soda.

d. The heat beneath the can moves away into other parts of the countertop.


Heat transfer evaluation1

Heat Transfer Evaluation

1. You pick up a can of soda off of the countertop. The countertop underneath the can feels colder than the rest of the counter. Which explanation do you think is the best?

a. The cold has been transferred from the soda to the counter.

b. There is no heat energy left in the counter beneath the can.

c. Some heat has been transferred from the counter to the soda.

d. The heat beneath the can moves away into other parts of the countertop.


Heat transfer evaluation2

Heat Transfer Evaluation

2. After cooking an egg in boiling water, you cool the egg by putting it into a bowl of cold water. Which of the following explains the egg’s cooling process?

a. Temperature is transferred from the egg to the water.

b. Cold moves from the water into the egg.

c. Energy is transferred from the water to the egg.

d. Energy is transferred from the egg to the water.


Heat transfer evaluation3

Heat Transfer Evaluation

2. After cooking an egg in boiling water, you cool the egg by putting it into a bowl of cold water. Which of the following explains the egg’s cooling process?

a. Temperature is transferred from the egg to the water.

b. Cold moves from the water into the egg.

c. Energy is transferred from the water to the egg.

d. Energy is transferred from the egg to the water.


Heat transfer evaluation4

Heat Transfer Evaluation

3. Why do we wear sweaters in cold weather?

a. To keep cold out.

b. To generate heat.

c. To reduce heat loss.

d. All of the above.


Heat transfer evaluation5

Heat Transfer Evaluation

3. Why do we wear sweaters in cold weather?

a. To keep cold out.

b. To generate heat.

c. To reduce heat loss.

d. All of the above.


Heat transfer evaluation6

Heat Transfer Evaluation

 4. Amy wraps her dolls in blankets but can’t understand why they don’t warm up. Why don’t they warm up?

a. The blankets she uses are probably poor insulators.

b. The blankets she uses are probably poor conductors.

c. The dolls are made of materials which don’t hold heat well.

d. None of the above.


Heat transfer evaluation7

Heat Transfer Evaluation

 4. Amy wraps her dolls in blankets but can’t understand why they don’t warm up. Why don’t they warm up?

a. The blankets she uses are probably poor insulators.

b. The blankets she uses are probably poor conductors.

c. The dolls are made of materials which don’t hold heat well.

d. None of the above.


Heat transfer evaluation8

Heat Transfer Evaluation

5. As water in a freezer turns into ice,

a. the water absorbs energy from the air in the freezer.

b. the water absorbs the coldness from the air in the freezer.

c. the freezer air absorbs heat from the water.

d. the water neither absorbs nor releases energy


Heat transfer evaluation9

Heat Transfer Evaluation

5. As water in a freezer turns into ice,

a. the water absorbs energy from the air in the freezer.

b. the water absorbs the coldness from the air in the freezer.

c. the freezer air absorbs heat from the water.

d. the water neither absorbs nor releases energy


Heat transfer evaluation10

Heat Transfer Evaluation

6. On a warm sunny day, you will feel cooler wearing light colored clothes because they

a. reflect more radiation.

b. prevent sweating.

c. are not as heavy as dark clothes.

d. let more air in.


Heat transfer evaluation11

Heat Transfer Evaluation

6. On a warm sunny day, you will feel cooler wearing light colored clothes because they

a. reflect more radiation.

b. prevent sweating.

c. are not as heavy as dark clothes.

d. let more air in.


Heat transfer evaluation12

Heat Transfer Evaluation

 7. If you put a metal spoon and a wooden spoon into a pot of boiling water, one will become too hot to touch. Why?

a. Metals conduct heat better than wood.

b. Wood conducts heat better than metals.

c. Metals pull in heat because heat is attracted to metals.

d. Wood isn’t as strong as metals.


Heat transfer evaluation13

Heat Transfer Evaluation

 7. If you put a metal spoon and a wooden spoon into a pot of boiling water, one will become too hot to touch. Why?

a. Metals conduct heat better than wood.

b. Wood conducts heat better than metals.

c. Metals pull in heat because heat is attracted to metals.

d. Wood isn’t as strong as metals.


Heat transfer evaluation14

Heat Transfer Evaluation

8. On a hot day, the upstairs rooms in a house are usually hotter than the downstairs rooms. Why?

a. Cool air is less dense than hot air.

b. Warm air rises and cool air sinks.

c. The upstairs rooms are closer to the sun.

d. Heat rises.


Heat transfer evaluation15

Heat Transfer Evaluation

8. On a hot day, the upstairs rooms in a house are usually hotter than the downstairs rooms. Why?

a. Cool air is less dense than hot air.

b. Warm air rises and cool air sinks.

c. The upstairs rooms are closer to the sun.

d. Heat rises.


Heat transfer evaluation16

Heat Transfer Evaluation

9. You have a can of soda in your lunchbox that you want to keep cold. Which material will work best to keep it cold?

a. Aluminum foil wrapped around the soda because metals transfer heat energy easily.

b. A paper towel wrapped around the soda because paper soaks up the moisture.

c. Wax paper wrapped around the soda because wax paper traps the moisture.

d. Your wool sweater wrapped around the soda because wool traps air.


Heat transfer evaluation17

Heat Transfer Evaluation

9. You have a can of soda in your lunchbox that you want to keep cold. Which material will work best to keep it cold?

a. Aluminum foil wrapped around the soda because metals transfer heat energy easily.

b. A paper towel wrapped around the soda because paper soaks up the moisture.

c. Wax paper wrapped around the soda because wax paper traps the moisture.

d. Your wool sweater wrapped around the soda because wool traps air.


Heat transfer evaluation18

Heat Transfer Evaluation

10. When you hold a metal coat hanger in a camp fire to roast a marshmallow, the coat hanger might get too hot to hold. Why might the coat hanger get too hot?

a. The heat radiates along the coat hanger.

b. The heat builds up near the flame until it can’t hold it anymore and then moves along the coat hanger.

c. Metal atoms vibrate with more energy when they get hot, and they collide with atoms near them, which makes the neighboring atoms vibrate too.

d. Since metals melt in fire, they react very strongly to fire and get hot easily. 


Heat transfer evaluation19

Heat Transfer Evaluation

10. When you hold a metal coat hanger in a camp fire to roast a marshmallow, the coat hanger might get too hot to hold. Why might the coat hanger get too hot?

a. The heat radiates along the coat hanger.

b. The heat builds up near the flame until it can’t hold it anymore and then moves along the coat hanger.

c. Metal atoms vibrate with more energy when they get hot, and they collide with atoms near them, which makes the neighboring atoms vibrate too.

d. Since metals melt in fire, they react very strongly to fire and get hot easily. 


Heat transfer evaluation20

Heat Transfer Evaluation

11. An aluminum plate and a plastic plate have been in the freezer all night long. When you remove them the next morning,

a. The plates have the same temperature.

b. The plastic plate has a higher temperature.

c. The plastic plate has a lower temperature.

d. The aluminum plate has a lower temperature.


Heat transfer evaluation21

Heat Transfer Evaluation

11. An aluminum plate and a plastic plate have been in the freezer all night long. When you remove them the next morning,

a. The plates have the same temperature.

b. The plastic plate has a higher temperature.

c. The plastic plate has a lower temperature.

d. The aluminum plate has a lower temperature.


Heat transfer evaluation22

Heat Transfer Evaluation

12. When placed in direct sunlight, which object will absorb the most radiation?

a. a white sweater

b. a snowball

c. some aluminum foil

d. a black sweater  


Heat transfer evaluation23

Heat Transfer Evaluation

12. When placed in direct sunlight, which object will absorb the most radiation?

a. a white sweater

b. a snowball

c. some aluminum foil

d. a black sweater  


Methods

Methods

ETK+D

Save the Penguins with five targeted demos

n=23( 12M, 11F)

n=11 pre-interviews

HTE and ATES pretest/posttest

n=10 exit interviews

  • ETK

  • Save the Penguins without five targeted demos

  • n=21 (9M, 12F)

  • n=8 pre- interviews

  • HTE and ATES pretest/posttest

  • n=10 exit interviews

  • Control

  • Typical instruction: labs, lectures, demos

  • n=27 (17M, 10F)

  • n=10 pre-interviews

  • HTE and ATES pretest/posttest

  • n=10 exit interviews

Equivalent scores on pretests, and 7th grade math and reading VA SOLs


Results heat transfer pre

Results: Heat Transfer- pre

Pretest scores on Heat Transfer Evaluation

ETK: M=4.33

Control: M=4.63

ETK+D: M=4.09

F(2,68) = .601

p = .551

ETK

CONTROL

ETK+D


Results heat transfer pre1

Results: Heat Transfer- pre

Cold transfers

Metals trap cold

Metals are colder than plastics

Light colors reflect radiation/ dark colors absorb

Metals are conductors

Heat rises

Hot air rises

Insulators generate heat

Sweaters reduce heat loss


Results heat transfer after

Results: Heat Transfer- after

ETK: M=6.43

Control: M=7.19

ETK+D: M=8.22


Results heat transfer after1

Results: Heat Transfer- after

Pre-Posttest Gains on Heat Transfer Evaluation

Repeated measures ANOVA F(2,68) = 6.659 p = .002

ANCOVA F(2,67) = 6.549 p = .003


Results heat transfer after2

Results: Heat Transfer- after

ANOVA comparisons

ETK+D to Control, p = .005

ETK+D to ETK, p = .002

Control to ETK, p = .448


Results eng attitudes pre

Results: Eng Attitudes- pre

  • Pretest scores on Attitudes toward Engineering Survey

  • ETK: M=3.35

  • Control: M=3.52

  • ETK+D: M=3.64

  • F(2,68) = 2.271

  • p = .111

  • Cronbach’sα = .76

ETK

CONTROL

ETK+D


Results eng attitudes pre1

Results: Eng Attitudes- pre

Researcher: Do you have any idea what an engineer’s job would be?

Kate (ETK Class): Like driving a train?

Researcher: What kinds of people do you think grow up to be engineers?

Kate: Ones who like driving trains.

Researcher: Do you have any idea, what an engineer might do for a living? What their job might be?

Woody (Control Class): Fix cars.

Researcher: Any other things engineers might do?

Woody: Fix automobiles. Fix planes. Fix something mechanical.


Results eng attitudes after

Results: Eng Attitudes- after

  • ETK: M=3.57

  • Control: M=3.61

  • ETK+D: M=3.90


Results eng attitudes after1

Results: Eng Attitudes- after

  • Pre- Posttest gains on Attitudes toward Engineering

  • ETK: M=3.57 t(20) = 3.739, p= .001

  • Control: M=3.61 t(26)=1.347, p = .190

  • ETK+D: M=3.90 t(22)=2.659, p = .014


Gender effect eng attitudes

Gender Effect ? - Eng Attitudes

ETK males:

t(8) = 2.290, p=.051

ETK+D males:

t(11) = 1.147, p = .276

ETK females:

t(11) = 2.939, p =.013

ETK+D females:

t(10) = 2.905, p = .016

Control males:

t(16) = 0.296, p = .771

Control females:

t(9) = 1.904, p = .089


Conclusions implications

Conclusions/ Implications

  • Engineering design can promote conceptual change as well as typical instruction

  • ETK+D is better than typical or ETK alone

    • Students’ alternative conceptions should be addressed

  • Middle school teacher can implement engineering design with some basic training

    • Engineering design activities can promote positive attitudes toward engineering


  • Login