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Lecture Presentation Software to accompany Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management Seventh Edition by Frank K. Reilly & Keith C. Brown. Chapter 19. The Fundamentals of Bond Valuation. The present-value model. Where: P m =the current market price of the bond

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Lecture Presentation Softwareto accompanyInvestment Analysis and Portfolio ManagementSeventh Editionby Frank K. Reilly & Keith C. Brown

Chapter 19

the fundamentals of bond valuation
The Fundamentals of Bond Valuation

The present-value model

Where:

Pm=the current market price of the bond

n = the number of years to maturity

C= the annual coupon payment for bond i

i = the prevailing yield to maturity for this bond issue

Pp=the par value of the bond

the fundamentals of bond valuation1
If yield < coupon rate, bond will be priced at a premium to its par value

If yield > coupon rate, bond will be priced at a discount to its par value

Price-yield relationship is convex (not a straight line)

The Fundamentals of Bond Valuation
the yield model
The Yield Model

The expected yield on the bond may be computed from the market price

Where:

i = the discount rate that will discount the cash flows to equal the current market price of the bond

computing bond yields
Computing Bond Yields

Yield Measure Purpose

Nominal Yield

Measures the coupon rate

Current yield

Measures current income rate

Promised yield to maturity

Measures expected rate of return for bond held to maturity

Promised yield to call

Measures expected rate of return for bond held to first call date

Measures expected rate of return for a bond likely to be sold prior to maturity. It considers specified reinvestment assumptions and an estimated sales price. It can also measure the actual rate of return on a bond during some past period of time.

Realized (horizon) yield

nominal yield
Nominal Yield

Measures the coupon rate that a bond investor receives as a percent of the bond’s par value

current yield
Current Yield

Similar to dividend yield for stocks

Important to income oriented investors

CY = C/Pm

where:

CY = the current yield on a bond

C = the annual coupon payment of bond

Pm = the current market price of the bond

promised yield to maturity
Promised Yield to Maturity
  • Widely used bond yield figure
  • Assumes
    • Investor holds bond to maturity
    • All the bond’s cash flow is reinvested at the computed yield to maturity

Solve for i that will equate the current price to all cash flows from the bond to maturity, similar to IRR

computing the promised yield to maturity
Computing the Promised Yield to Maturity

Two methods

  • Approximate promised yield
    • Easy, less accurate
  • Present-value model
    • More involved, more accurate
approximate promised yield
Approximate Promised Yield

Coupon + Annual Straight-Line Amortization of Capital Gain or Loss

Average Investment

=

promised yield to call approximation
Promised Yield to CallApproximation
  • May be less than yield to maturity
  • Reflects return to investor if bond is called and cannot be held to maturity

Where:

AYC = approximate yield to call (YTC)

Pc= call price of the bond

Pm = market price of the bond

C= annual coupon payment

nc = the number of years to first call date

promised yield to call present value method
Promised Yield to CallPresent-Value Method

Where:

Pm= market price of the bond

C = annual coupon payment

nc = number of years to first call

Pc = call price of the bond

realized yield approximation
Realized Yield Approximation

Where:

ARY = approximate realized yield to call (YTC)

Pf= estimated future selling price of the bond

C= annual coupon payment

hp = the number of years in holding period of the bond

calculating future bond prices
Calculating Future Bond Prices

Where:

Pf= estimated future price of the bond

C = annual coupon payment

n = number of years to maturity

hp = holding period of the bond in years

i = expected semiannual rate at the end of the holding period

what determines interest rates
What Determines Interest Rates
  • Inverse relationship with bond prices
  • Forecasting interest rates
  • Fundamental determinants of interest rates

i = RFR + I + RP

where:

    • RFR = real risk-free rate of interest
    • I = expected rate of inflation
    • RP = risk premium
what determines interest rates1
What Determines Interest Rates
  • Effect of economic factors
    • real growth rate
    • tightness or ease of capital market
    • expected inflation
    • or supply and demand of loanable funds
  • Impact of bond characteristics
    • credit quality
    • term to maturity
    • indenture provisions
    • foreign bond risk including exchange rate risk and country risk
what determines interest rates2
What Determines Interest Rates
  • Term structure of interest rates
  • Expectations hypothesis
  • Liquidity preference hypothesis
  • Segmented market hypothesis
  • Trading implications of the term structure
expectations hypothesis
Any long-term interest rate simply represents the geometric mean of current and future one-year interest rates expected to prevail over the maturity of the issueExpectations Hypothesis
liquidity preference theory
Long-term securities should provide higher returns than short-term obligations because investors are willing to sacrifice some yields to invest in short-maturity obligations to avoid the higher price volatility of long-maturity bondsLiquidity Preference Theory
segmented market hypothesis
Different institutional investors have different maturity needs that lead them to confine their security selections to specific maturity segmentsSegmented-Market Hypothesis
yield spreads
Yield Spreads
  • Segments: government bonds, agency bonds, and corporate bonds
  • Sectors: prime-grade municipal bonds versus good-grade municipal bonds, AA utilities versus BBB utilities
what determines the price volatility for bonds
What Determines the Price Volatility for Bonds

Bond price change is measured as the percentage change in the price of the bond

Where:

EPB = the ending price of the bond

BPB = the beginning price of the bond

what determines the price volatility for bonds1
What Determines the Price Volatility for Bonds

Four Factors

1. Par value

2. Coupon

3. Years to maturity

4. Prevailing market interest rate

what determines the price volatility for bonds2
What Determines the Price Volatility for Bonds

Five observed behaviors

1. Bond prices move inversely to bond yields (interest rates)

2. For a given change in yields, longer maturity bonds post larger price changes, thus bond price volatility is directly related to maturity

3. Price volatility increases at a diminishing rate as term to maturity increases

4. Price movements resulting from equal absolute increases or decreases in yield are not symmetrical

5. Higher coupon issues show smaller percentage price fluctuation for a given change in yield, thus bond price volatility is inversely related to coupon

what determines the price volatility for bonds3
What Determines the Price Volatility for Bonds
  • The maturity effect
  • The coupon effect
  • The yield level effect
  • Some trading strategies
the duration measure
The Duration Measure
  • Since price volatility of a bond varies inversely with its coupon and directly with its term to maturity, it is necessary to determine the best combination of these two variables to achieve your objective
  • A composite measure considering both coupon and maturity would be beneficial
the duration measure1
The Duration Measure

Developed by Frederick R. Macaulay, 1938

Where:

t = time period in which the coupon or principal payment occurs

Ct= interest or principal payment that occurs in period t

i = yield to maturity on the bond

characteristics of duration
Characteristics of Duration
  • Duration of a bond with coupons is always less than its term to maturity because duration gives weight to these interim payments
    • A zero-coupon bond’s duration equals its maturity
  • There is an inverse relation between duration and coupon
  • There is a positive relation between term to maturity and duration, but duration increases at a decreasing rate with maturity
  • There is an inverse relation between YTM and duration
  • Sinking funds and call provisions can have a dramatic effect on a bond’s duration
modified duration and bond price volatility
Modified Duration and Bond Price Volatility

An adjusted measure of duration can be used to approximate the price volatility of a bond

Where:

m = number of payments a year

YTM = nominal YTM

duration and bond price volatility
Duration and Bond Price Volatility
  • Bond price movements will vary proportionally with modified duration for small changes in yields
  • An estimate of the percentage change in bond prices equals the change in yield time modified duration

Where:

P = change in price for the bond

P = beginning price for the bond

Dmod = the modified duration of the bond

i = yield change in basis points divided by 100

trading strategies using duration
Trading Strategies Using Duration
  • Longest-duration security provides the maximum price variation
  • If you expect a decline in interest rates, increase the average duration of your bond portfolio to experience maximum price volatility
  • If you expect an increase in interest rates, reduce the average duration to minimize your price decline
  • Note that the duration of your portfolio is the market-value-weighted average of the duration of the individual bonds in the portfolio
bond convexity
Bond Convexity
  • Equation 19.6 is a linear approximation of bond price change for small changes in market yields
bond convexity1
Bond Convexity
  • Modified duration is a linear approximation of bond price change for small changes in market yields
  • Price changes are not linear, but a curvilinear (convex) function
price yield relationship for bonds
Price-Yield Relationship for Bonds
  • The graph of prices relative to yields is not a straight line, but a curvilinear relationship
  • This can be applied to a single bond, a portfolio of bonds, or any stream of future cash flows
  • The convex price-yield relationship will differ among bonds or other cash flow streams depending on the coupon and maturity
  • The convexity of the price-yield relationship declines slower as the yield increases
  • Modified duration is the percentage change in price for a nominal change in yield
limitations of macaulay and modified duration
Limitations of Macaulay and Modified Duration
  • Percentage change estimates using modified duration only are good for small-yield changes
  • Difficult to determine the interest-rate sensitivity of a portfolio of bonds when there is a change in interest rates and the yield curve experiences a nonparallel shift
  • Initial assumption that cash flows from the bond are not affected by yield changes
effective duration
Effective Duration
  • Measure of the interest rate sensitivity of an asset
  • Use a pricing model to estimate the market prices surrounding a change in interest rates

Effective Duration

P- = the estimated price after a downward shift in interest rates

P+ = the estimated price after a upward shift in interest rates

P = the current price

S = the assumed shift in the term structure

effective duration1
Effective Duration
  • Effective duration greater than maturity
  • Negative effective duration
  • Empirical duration
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