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CS320 Algorithms: Theory and Practice. Representative problems.

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Cs320 algorithms theory and practice

CS320 Algorithms: Theory and Practice

Representative problems

"For me, great algorithms are the poetry of computation. Just like verse, they can be terse, allusive, dense, and even mysterious. But once unlocked, they cast a brilliant new light on some aspect of computing." - Francis Sullivan


T he problem solving paradigm
The problem solving paradigm

  • Formulate it with precision (usually using mathematical concepts, such as sets, relations, and graphs)

  • Design an algorithm

  • Prove its correctness

  • Analyze its running time (complexity)

  • Implement respecting the derived complexity


Interval scheduling

b

e

h

Interval Scheduling

  • Input. Set of jobs with start times and finish times.

  • Goal. Find maximum cardinality subset of compatible jobs.

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Time

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11


Algorithmic a pproach
Algorithmic Approach

  • The interval scheduling problem is amenable to a very simple solution.

  • Now that you know this, can you think of it?

  • Hint: Think how to pick a first interval while preserving the longest possible free time...


Weighted interval scheduling
Weighted Interval Scheduling

  • Input. Set of jobs with start times, finish times, and weights.

  • Goal. Find maximum weight subset of compatible jobs.

23

12

20

26

13

20

11

16

Time

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11


Bipartite matching
Bipartite Matching

  • Input. Bipartite graph.

  • Goal. Find maximumcardinality matching.

A

1

Matching in bipartite graphs can model assignment problems, e.g., assigning jobs to machines, where an edge between a job j and a machine m indicates that m can do job j, or professors and courses.

How is this different from the stable matching problem?

B

2

C

3

D

4

E


Independent set

1

4

5

6

Independent Set

  • Input. Graph.

  • Goal. Find maximum cardinality independent set.

subset of nodes such that no two are joined by an edge

2

1

4

5

3

7

6

Can you formulate interval scheduling as an independent set problem?


Independent set problem
Independent set problem

  • There is no known efficient way to solve the independent set problem.

  • What does that mean?

  • There is no known algorithm that solves the problem in a polynomial number of steps (polynomial in the number of nodes).

  • We can always solve the problem by brute force: check all sub sets and find the largest one that is also an independent set.

  • How many subsets of a set of n nodes are there?


Representative problems complexities
Representative Problems / Complexities

  • Interval scheduling: n log(n) greedy algorithm.

  • Weighted interval scheduling: n log(n) dynamic programming algorithm.

  • Bipartite matching: polynomial max-flow based algorithm.

  • Independent set: NP-complete (no known polynomial algorithm exists).

  • Competitive facility location (see book): PSPACE-complete.


Algorithm
Algorithm

  • Algorithm: A series of well defined instructions for solving a given problem.

    • Turing defined it as: "like a Turing machine”

      Is there an algorithm for every possible problem?


Ulam s problem
Ulam's problem

def f(n) :

if (n==1) return 1

elif (odd(n)) return f(3*n+1)

else return f(n/2)

Does f(n) always stop?

Steps in running f(n) for a few values of n:

1

2, 1,

3, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1

4, 2, 1

5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1

6, 3, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1

7, 22, 11, 34, 17, 52, 26, 13, 40, 20, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1

8, 4, 2, 1

9, 28, 14, 7, 22, 11, 34, 17, 52, 26, 13, 40, 20, 10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1

10, 5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1


Ulam s problem1
Ulam's problem

def f(n) :

if (n==1) return 1

elif (odd(n)) return f(3*n+1)

else return f(n/2)

Nobody has found an n for which f does not stop

Nobody has found a proof(so there can be no algorithm deciding this.)

A generalization of this problem has been proven to be undecidable.

  • A problem P is undecidable, if there is no algorithm that produces P(x) for every possible input x

    Does f(n) always stop?


The halting p roblem is undecidable
The Halting Problem is undecidable

  • Given a program P and input x

    will P stop on x?

    We can prove (cs420):

    the halting problem is undecidable

    i.e. there is no algorithm Halt(P,x) that for any program P and input x decides whether P stops on x.


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