Types of wood joints
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Types of Wood Joints. Dowel Joint. Dowels come in different sizes ¼”, 3/8”, ½” , 5/8” etc. These joints are hidden and add strength to the joint. Dowel holes are drill and glued and clamped together. Dado.

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Dowel Joint

  • Dowels come in different sizes ¼”, 3/8”, ½” , 5/8” etc.

  • These joints are hidden and add strength to the joint.

  • Dowel holes are drill and glued and clamped together.


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Dado

  • Dado's are typically used in making book shelves, they support the shelf without the benefit of any additional fasteners, any glue or hardware simply holds the shelf in place.

  • Dados may be made with a dado blade on a table saw


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Rabbet Joint

  • This type of joint is made by using the dado blade.

  • Each side of wood is cut to a specific length, then glued or brad nailed to make a stronger joint.


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Lap Joint

  • A lap joint is when two piece are cut on a dado and glued or nail together to create a stronger joint.


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Dovetail Joints

Most commonly used to attach drawer sides to drawer fronts, dovetails joints almost always indicate quality furniture.

Typically cut using a manufactured jig to cut these. Can be done by hand.


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Mortise and Tenon

  • The mortise and tenon joint is one of the strongest wood joints.

  • Mortise and tenon joint is normally formed by cutting a square tongue (the tenon) on the end of one piece of wood and an equal size square hole or slot (the mortise) in another.


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Mitre with Wood Spline

Mitered corners make the joint disappear. They have a clean look, and can be strengthened with splines. Splines can be either hidden inside the joint or cut on the outside. I


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Tongue and Groove

  • Tongue and groove or T&G is a method of fitting similar objects together, edge to edge, used mainly with wood: flooring, parquetry, panelling, and similar constructions. Tongue and groove joints allow two flat pieces to be joined strongly together to make a single flat surface.

  • The effect of wood shrinkage is concealed when the joint is beaded or otherwise moulded


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